History of the Merchant Navy
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Prince Line

Prince Line was founded by James Knott who was born on 31st January 1855, the eldest son of Matthew Knott, a grocer of Heddon on the north bank on the River Tyne. Matthew Knott owned a corner shop where he manufactured his own brand of biscuit and other relatives included a chemist and a rope manufacturer. By the end of 1855 Matthew Knott had expanded into beer, wine and spirits retailing and had moved to North Shields. When James was ready to leave school at the age of 14 his father’s business was moderately successful and James could have taken an easy path and joined the family firm. However, having become a regular worshipper and helper at the Howard Street Wesleyan Church, the puritanism of the chapel probably influenced James’s choice of career.
Consequently, in 1869, he found a job as an office boy with a shipping company on Newcastle Quayside and six years later, at the age of 20, started his own business as a shipbroker and merchant. He quickly came to the conclusion that shipowning provided more opportunities than broking and in 1878 he purchased his first ship, the Scarborough registered collier brig Pearl, for £186. At the same time he began to manage other sailing ships which were owned by shareholders on the 64ths principle. In the same year James married Margaret Annie, the daughter of the Reverend Thomas Garbutt, who was destined to bear him three sons, Thomas, James and Henry.

James was quick to see the advantages of steam and in March 1881 his fist steam ship, the Saxon Prince, was launched at C.S. Swan & Hunter’s yard at Wallsend and during the following two years eight additional vessels joined his fleet. On 11th July 1884 James formed the Prince Steam Shipping Company to manage some of his ships even though the shipping industry was at the time in a depressed state. The Highland Prince, which had been built by Short brothers at Sunderland in 1883, was the first ship registered under the new company. The company, in which James was the principal shareholder, had a nominal capital of £250,000 of which only £52,060 was initially paid up. The Prince of Wales feathers were adopted as the company crest.


James Knott (1855-1934)

During the following two years six more six new ships joined the fleet and a close relationship developed between James Knott and the Short Brothers at Sunderland, a relationship which provided financial stability for the shipyard. When John Young Short took control of the yard upon the death of his father George in 1870 he was keen on ship design development and advocated the construction of cargo vessels with greater beams to improve stability. This new trend won the company awards for ship design and established the shipyard as a builder of quality ships.
In 1886 James Knott sold his remaining sailing ships to W. Milburn of South Shields and by 1888 his fleet of steam ships consisted of twenty one vessels. The company was, by now, reasonably well established and James called upon his shareholders to contribute further paid up capital to finance the building of four additional ships, each of around 3,200 tons. One of the new buildings, the Asiatic Prince, had the distinction of being one of the first ships to enter the new port at Buenos Aires in 1889.

Still very aware of new opportunities within the shipping industry James Knott ordered a bulk 4,380 dwt bulk oil-tanker from the yard of Armstrong, Mitchell & Co. Ltd at Tyne only three years after the first purpose built oil-tanker, the Gluckauf, entered service in 1886. Named Russian Prince she was quickly joined by the Circassian Prince and the Oranje Prince, the former being the first bulk oil-tanker built by C.S. Swan & Hunter. The ships were deployed on the company’s routes which, by now extended from North to South America, the UK to the Continent and South America and a service from the Mediterranean to West Indies and Gulf ports.

In building a major shipping company James Knott was a hard task master. All his ships carried the notice ‘All accidents are the result of carelessness’ pasted on the forepart of the bridge and the wise master took every precaution to avoid a confrontation with the owner. In addition to building a shipping empire James Knott also studied law and was called to the Bar in 1889 but had to abandon his legal practice after only four years to concentrate on his marine business. In 1906 he unsuccessfully contested the Parliamentary seat at Tyneside but in 1910 was elected to the House of Commons as the Conservative member for Sunderland. Since most of his ships were built in Sunderland this may have contributed to his election and certainly to the Presidency of the Institute of Marine Engineers in 1907. James Knott was a man of many talents, shipowner, barrister, Member of Parliament, farmer, colliery owner, churchman, sportsman, deep sea fisherman, yachtsman, philanthropist, student and gardener, attributes which were recognised when he became a Knight of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem.

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By 1890 the fleet consisted of 29 steam ships and three years later the size had increased to 47 ships with new ships arriving at regular intervals. Up until 1896 most of the ships had clipper bows and were affectionately referred to as ‘Jimmy Knott’s yachts’.
The company commenced a regular service to the Mediterranean in 1894 just prior to the opening of the Manchester Ship Canal. This came about primarily because Moss Line, who had a virtual monopoly of the Egyptian cotton trade, refused to use the canal in line with other Liverpool shipowners who had opposed the maritime link to Manchester. James Knott, who up until the canal’s opening used Saltport for a service to Tunis, Malta, Egypt, Palestine, Syria, Greece and Cyprus, accepted an invitation to use the canal and was represented at the Opening Ceremony on 1st January 1884 by the Belgian Prince which had recently arrived from Alexandria with a cargo of raw cotton.

Prince Line (1895) Ltd was incorporated on the 28th February 1895 with fourteen ships so as to make the company more attractive to shippers using the regular liner trades to the River Plate, West Indies, Levant, Greece, Egypt and Syria. The company, whose registered office was at the Prudential Assurance Buildings in Dean Street, Newcastle was formed with a nominal capital of £500,000 divided into 50,000 shares of £10 each. The first six directors were C.H. Scott, J. Donald, W.R. Kay, J.D. Harrison, J.Unwin with James Knott as Managing Director. G.H. Elder was the company’s first managing clerk. James Knott, however, had the powers of the full Board and permanency of office as long as his shareholding remained above 100, he remained solvent and healthy and did not undertake any action which was deemed to be wilful misconduct. He had full power to make all seagoing and shore based managerial appointments and to effect all contracts relating to insurances, charters, repairs etc. James’s remuneration was based on gross registered tonnage and a percentage of the voyage profits.

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In 1900 Prince Line Ltd had 38 steam ships registered in its name and by this time a regular service from Genoa, Marseilles, Barcelona and Cadiz to the West Indies, Central America, Mexico and New Orleans was well established. However, the service from the Tyne to Central American ports, Mexico and New Orleans was the most popular with the Geordie crews as it allowed them to sign on and sign off at their home port. The company’s vessels carried a limited number of passengers with the fare to Gibraltar costing £6, to Tunis or Malta £9, to Alexandria £13 and to Beyrouth (Beirut) or Jaffa £16. At the same time the company was very much instrumental in developing the Jaffa orange trade by providing suitable tonnage to carry citrus fruits from the Holy Land and Palestine.
A service from New York to South Africa, India and the Far East was inaugurated in 1902 and with the opening of the Panama Canal in 1909 and expansion of the fleet in 1917 this was extended into a Round the World service to compete with companies such as Silver Line and Dollar Line.

The late Edwardian and pre-war era saw the company at its zenith. Larger vessels were built and added to a fleet which expanded to a size that was never matched in subsequent years. The prestige of the company was also at its peak during the years which led up to the First World War. In the year prior to the war four new ships built by Shorts joined the fleet and they were the last ships ordered by Sir James Knott. Also, immediately before the outbreak of the war the company was carrying one third of the Brazilian coffee crop from Brazil to New York and New Orleans.

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When the First World War broke out the fleet was comprised of 45 steam ships and during the hostilities 21 were lost through enemy action or other maritime actions and 86 crew members lost their lives.
On 15th September, 1915 Sir James’ third son Capt. Henry Basil Knott was killed in action at the Battle of Ypres while serving with the Northumberland Fusiliers. He was 24 years old. Major James Leadbitter Knott, Sir James’ second son, was killed at the Battle of the Somme on 1st July, 1916 while serving with the West Yorkshire Regiment. The two brothers were buried side by side in Ypres cemetery an event which, in its self was unique for relatives killed during those dreadful battles. The third brother, Thomas Garbutt Knott, also served in the army in Gallipoli, Palestine and South Africa and was captured and interned in Germany until Armistice Day.

Sir James Knott was devastated by the deaths of his sons and these tragic events were the main reason why he decided to sell the entire company to Furness, Withy & Co. for £3,000,000 at the end of 1916. Furness, Withy & Co. had been founded in West Hartlepool in September 1891 by Christopher Furness, later Lord Furness of Grantley, and Henry Withy. In 1884 Christopher Furness purchased the shipyard of Edward Withy, the brother of Henry Withy, when Edward decide to make a new life for himself in New Zealand. The company was incorporated to consolidate the various business interests of Furness which were spread between West Hartlepool and London. When Christopher Furness died in 1912 he was succeeded by his nephew Sir Stephen Furness MP who sadly died two years later while on holiday. Christopher Furness’s only son, the second Lord Furness, then became chairman of the company.

Under the Furness, Withy umbrella the livery of the Prince Line ships was altered to reflect the change of ownership and Sir James remained a director until the company’s operations were moved to 12, Leadenhall Street, London when the Furness family sold their shipping interests in 1919.

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Over the following years Sir James soon began to direct his activities to those of a more philanthropic nature. The loss of his sons had a profound effect on him and in memory of them he established and endowed the Knott Memorial Fund to assist the widows of men who fell in battle. His most conspicuous gift was the funding of the building of the Church of St. James and St. Basil in Fenham Hall Drive, Newcastle which incorporated a sunken garden of rest for the weary, old and infirm. His philanthropic works were recognised when he was created a baronet in July 1917.
Also in July 1917 the convoy system was introduced which undoubtedly prevented excessive further losses for the company. From that date until the end of the war only two further vessels were lost and one of those as the result of a grounding.

In 1919 the Furness family sold their interests in Furness, Withy & Company to a London based syndicate headed by Frederick Lewis who had previously been a director and manager of the London Office. The first task of the new management was to rebuild the fleet and they embarked upon a renewal programme which consisted primarily of purchased from the War Shipping Controller. Four new 8600,grt steam ships were ordered, two from Shorts and two from Palmers yard on the Tyne and William Pickerskill & Sons Ltd of Sunderland completed the first new building programme when they handed over the Persian Prince in July 1918 and the Arabian Prince in January 1919.

During 1917 the management of Furness, Withy incorporated Rio-Cape Line Ltd as a subsidiary of Prince Line Ltd. to operate the twelve steamers acquired when J. Gardiner & Co. of Glasgow was purchased. The ships, which were all prefixed ‘Glen’, were given the Prince Line slate grey hull and funnel livery. Due to war time restrictions the names of the ships could not be changed and initially the ex-Gardiner ships were managed by Prince Line, a situation which continued until the regulations were eased in January 1919 when the ships were renamed.

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J. Gardiner & Co. was formed in 1882 when Glasgow businessman James Gardiner decided to become a shipowner to augment his broking and insurance businesses. His first ship was the Arisaig and operated by James Gardiner & Co. on the 64th’s system. In 1888 he formed the Western Steam Ship Co. Ltd, with James Gardiner & Co. as managers, and embarked on a programme of new buildings at the yard of Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow.
The company initially began tramping operations because, at the time, half the world cargoes were carried by any available ship at the lowest freight rates. The company’s first service was between Rio de Janeiro and Cape Town carrying coffee. By 1912 the Gardiner fleet consisted of twelve ships operated by four companies, Western Steam Ship Co. Ltd with 4 ships, Indian Steam Ship Co. Ltd. with 4 ships, S.S. Gairloch Co. Ltd with two ships and S.S. Kincraig Co. Ltd. with two ships. At a later date one ship was owned by the Caledonia Steam Ship Co.

The new acquisitions traded between the USA to South America, South Africa and the Mediterranean and because of the increased size of the fleet the Round the World service was operated on a regular basis. In the early twenties new services were introduced from the USA to France, the Eastern Mediterranean and Black Sea ports. A service was also introduced from New Orleans to London and North German ports. At the same time Furness, Withy & Co.Ltd embarked upon an extensive new building programme for all their subsidiaries at their Haverton Hill shipyard on Teesside.

In 1925 Prince Line acquired their first motorships when Johnstone Line’s, another Furness, Withy subsidiary, Sycamore and Tramore were transferred and renamed Castillian Prince and Brazilian Prince. By 1927 the company owned 33 vessels and new twin screwed diesel engined ships were introduced when the Siamese Prince and four magnificent sisters, Northern Prince, Southern Prince, Western Prince and Eastern Prince joined the fleet. The four sisters were known as the ‘Compass Point’ ships and being at 10926grt were the largest dry-cargo ships ever owned by the company. They also carried 101 first-class passengers in luxury accommodation. Although competing with heavily subsidised American ships they were deployed on the New York to South America and continued on that run until the outbreak of the Second World War. In modernising the fleet the company made full use of available government support in the form of the Trade Facility Act guarantees and shipping loans.

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The downturn in shipbuilding in the mid ’20’s when Furness, Withy had to resort to German ship yards when no British yard could match the construction cost for five new motorships. Chairman, Sir Frederick Lewis, even offered £10,000 per vessel over the price bid by any foreign yard but no British yard that could match the German price. It later transpired that the German yard had undercosted and lost money on the deal although that could have been made good with a subsidy, a common practice in Germany.
On 8th June 1934 Sir James Knott died in his eightieth year. He had moved to the better climate of Jersey in 1928 and continued to pursue his philanthropic activities jus as eagerly as he had done in Newcastle. He had celebrated his Golden Wedding in 1928 but his wife died in the following year. However, four years later, in 1932, he married Miss Elizabeth Gauntlett the 25 year old daughter of Colonel V.C. Gauntlett at Monte Carlo where James had kept a yacht for years. When he died Sir James left over £5,000,000 which escaped death duties as he was resident in Jersey.

By 1936 the fleet had been reduced to only 19 ships but in October of that year four new 2090grt sisters were completed for the Mediterranean service by W. Hamilton & Co. of Port Glasgow. The company was given a 100% loan of £130,000 for the construction of the Arabian Prince and the Syrian Prince on the condition that two ships were scrapped under the Scrap and Build Bill. Consequently, the Sailor Prince and the Stuart Prince were sent to the scrapyard.

In January 1939 four more ships were ordered from Smiths Dock Co. Ltd of Middlesbrough for trading to the Mediterranean and were delivered during 1940-41. They were the first ships built for the company to be partially welded as opposed to riveting. A loan of £280,000 was granted by the Government under the British Shipping (Assistance) Bill against the total cost of £332,000 for the four Mediterranean traders. An unconditional loan of £104,000, representing 85% of the construction cost, was granted in respect of the building of the Welsh Prince.

At the outbreak of the Second World War the company was operating 20 vessels on four services; from the UK to the Mediterranean, between the USA and South Africa, from New York to South America and the Far East Round the World service on which six specialised 6,500grt vessels were deployed capable of 14.5 knots and with accommodation for twelve passengers.

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During the war the company maintained a reasonably consistent fleet level by replacing ships lost with new acquisitions. The convoy system was introduced at the onset of the war and this helped to minimise the company’s losses.
Frederick Lewis , who by this time was Lord Essendon and who had been chairman of Prince Line the 25 years since he acquired the company in 1919, died in 1944. He had worked for the Furness, Withy Group of Companies for 61years starting his career as an office boy in 1883. Under his guidance the company took a great interest in resolving the problems of providing fresh water for lifeboats and rafts. Prince Line was the first company to equip lifeboats with portable sea water distillers before the Ministry of War Transport made them compulsory. The company also compiled a comprehensive booklet which detailed war-time equipment that should be carried, a booklet that was later adopted by the MOWT and issued to all merchant vessels.

Sir Ernest Murrant MBE succeeded Lord Essendon as Chairman and, as the former Middle East representative of the Ministry of War Transport, had acquired a first hand knowledge on trade in that area.

Twelve new ships were acquired during the hostilities but, during the same period, Prince Line lost eight ships and the Rio-Cape Line lost six ships including three of the new acquisitions. 237 men lost their lives and an additional 33 perished on ships managed by the company on behalf of the Ministry of War Transport. On a more positive note 35 men were awarded decorations or received commendations for acts of heroism and selfless duty.

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Towards the end of 1950 Shaw Savill & Albion Ltd, a company acquired by the Furness Withy Group in 1933, inaugurated a new service from Mombasa, Durban and Cape Town to Australian ports. To operate the service Shaw Savill initially chartered the newly built Scottish Prince which was renamed Afric for the duration of the charter which eventually lasted for five years. Over the subsequent years Shaw Savill & Albion chartered several Prince Line ships.

In 1954 the Rio-Cape Line was wound up and the company’s fleet transferred to Prince Line. Six years later the Round the World service was discontinued and the company’s long haul routes were reduced to those operating from the UK and USA to the River Plate and the service from New York to South and East Africa.

During the late fifties early sixties flag discrimination and subsidised foreign tonnage forced a contraction of services and the company stopped operating the long haul services in favour of concentrating on the Mediterranean routes. Furthermore, in order to rationalise, joint operations were negotiated and the Mediterranean routes were operated in conjunction with Westcott Laurance Line as the Prince-Westcott service. The joint operation used the loading berths on the north quay at the West India Export Dock.

Prince Line withdrew from Manchester in 1968 and their agents Gough & Crossthwaite were taken over by Manchester Liners, another subsidiary of Furness Withy.

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In the late sixties the company was forced to charter ships either on a voyage by voyage basis or time charters while it awaited the completion of purpose built vessels for the Mediterranean service. Over a period of some fifteen years the company chartered a number of vessels from a variety of shipowners. However, in 1970 the need to charter was reduced when four purpose built ships were delivered.
The seventies saw the beginning of change within the worldwide shipping industry and in July 1972 the management of the company was transferred to Shaw Savill & Albion Ltd. Prince Line, together with the majority of conventional liner companies, could not escape the massive contraction caused by containerisation and redundancies and the switching of staff between companies became common place.

The company, however, continued to operate to the Mediterranean throughout the seventies and in 1979 ventured into containerisation when two cellular container ships were delivered by Swan Hunter Shipbuilders Ltd on the Tyne. The Crown Prince and the Royal Prince were capable of carrying 288 TEU containers, of which 50 were refrigerated, in stacks of three high. The Furness Withy management then amalgamated Prince Line with Manchester Liners in order to combine sailings from Ellesmere Port and Felixtowe.

In 1980 Furness Withy & Co. Ltd was taken over by C. Y. Tung who owned the Orient Overseas Container Line of Hong Kong and was also instrumental in the ill-fated floating university, Seawise University, which foundered when the Queen Elizabeth caught fire and sank in Hong Kong harbour. The acquisition by C. Y. Tung signalled the start of a dramatic rationlisation programme. Although he was educated at Liverpool University many of the group’s ships were transferred to flag of convenience registries and very few retained the Red Ensign.

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On 11th July 1984 the company celebrated its centenary. However, by this time the company only had the two container ships, the Crown Prince which had been renamed Manchester Crown on the Manchester Prince service and the Royal Prince which was on charter to Ellerman Lines as the City of Oporto. In 1985 the Crown Prince recovered her name before being sold to Far East owners together with the Manchester Crown. Prince Line no longer had any vessels.
Prince Line still exists, albeit, in name only. In 1990 the bulk of the Furness Withy Group was sold to to the German based company Hamburg-Sud for $130,000,000. The name chosen for the UK Holding company was Shaw Savill Holdings Ltd. Consequently, the bulk of the paid-up share capital of Prince Line is currently held by Shaw Savill Holdings Ltd.

The Sir James Knott Trust still flourishes and in 1984 granted an endowment to enable the building of an extension to the Hatton Gallery in the department of Fine art at Newcastle University.

Prince Line

SAILING SHIPS OWNED OR PART OWNED BY JAMES KNOTT

PEARL was a brig built around 1842 at Sunderland with a tonnage of 181grt, a length of 83ft 7in and a beam of 22ft 4in. She was initially registered as being owned by J. Miller of Scarborough and by 1861 was owned by Collinson & Wheatley of North Shields with Wheatley as the master. Purchased by James Knott for £185 in 1878 she undertook two voyages each year to South America until 1883 when she was broken up.

AMI was a brig built in 1844 at Sunderland with a tonnage of 182grt, a length of 81ft 5in and a beam of 24ft 5in. Her first owner is not recorded but in 1878 she was owned by M. Bedlington of Whitby. She was registered as being owned by James Knott in 1880 but out of the register in 1883.

CHARITY was a brig built around 1857 at Arbroath with a tonnage of 219grt, a length of 97ft 2in and a beam of 23ft 6in. She was built for G. Bambra and by 1861 was owned by Leslie & Co. of Arbroath. By 1871 she was owned by W Alexander of Arbroath and in 1882 James Knott was listed as the registree. In 1888 she was handed over to Wm. Milburn of North Shields who eventually took over the management of James Knott’s sailing ships when he started to acquire steam ships. She was sold to J. Boyes of Arbroath in 1890 and was no longer listed in Lloyds Register in 1893.

LANCET was a brig built in 1855 by J. Taylor at Sunderland with a tonnage of 228grt, a length of 97ft 6in and a beam of 24ft 8in. She was initially owned by G.S. Willis of Whitby and in 1861 was sold to Horsley & Co. of Hartlepool. James Knott was listed as the owner in 1882 and she was passed to Wm. Milburn in 1886. By 1893 she was no longer listed in Lloyds Register.

LEVANT was a brig built around 1853 at Dundee with a tonnage of 227grt, a length of 96ft 2in and a beam of 21ft 6in. She was initially owned by J. Hoggarth and in 1861 was sold to MacKenzie of Dundee. James Knott was listed as the owner and Mediterranean trader in 1882. She was transferred to Wm. Milburn in 1886 and by 1892 all trace of her was lost.

AMANDA was a brig built in 1865 by Ross at Prince Edward Island with a tonnage of 199grt, a length of 99ft 10in and a beam of 25ft 5in. Built in Canada it was customary to sail the ships across the Atlantic with a full load of timber and then to sell them by sealed tender on arrival, a price indication being published in the local newspaper. When the Amanda arrived at Liverpool in October 1865 she was purchased by J. Jones of Beaumaris. As Beaumaris was a shore loading port using horse and cart at low tide her home port was moved to Amlwch, where there was a stone quay, in 1871. Since 1865 Canadian built ships were constructed with a circular stern (counter stern) as they were stronger than the square stern. In 1882 James Knott was registered as the owner and she was passed to Wm. Milburn in 1888. Sold to W.B. Cooper of Lowestoft for use as a fishing vessel in 1890 all trace of her was thereafter lost.

BREMNER was a brig built in 1865 by Macmillan at Prince Edward Island with a tonnage of 194grt, a length of 103ft 6in and a beam of 24ft 5in. She was initially owned by B.Hanrahan of Ardrossan and in 1871 by J. Hooks also of Ardrosan. James Knott became the manager in 1882. In 1886 she was owned by J. Watson of North Shields with Wm. Milburn as manager. J. Watson to over the management of the vessel in 1890 and thereafter all trace of her was lost.

DANIEL was a brig built in 1871 by Macmillan at Prince Edward Island with a tonnage of 198grt, a length of 105ft and a beam of 24ft 7in. She was initially purchased by D.Paton of Llanelli and was taken over by James Knott in 1882. In 1885 she was wrecked during a voyage to the Baltic.

TRYPHENA was a brig built in 1865 by Cousins at Prince Edward Island with a tonnage of 193grt, a length of 100ft 4in and a beam of 24ft 6in. She was initially purchased by T. Baker of Cardiff in October 1865 and was sold to Harris & Co. of Cardigan in 1871. In 1882 she was registered by James Knott who was also her manager. Wm. Milburn took over the management in 1886 and by 1890 was no longer registered, no doubt having been dismantled after 25 years of service.

REMEMBRANCE was a brig built around 1847 at South Shields with a tonnage of 252grt, a length of 93ft 7in and a beam of 26ft 7in. She was initially owned by B. Tindall of Whitby for trading to the Baltic. In 1878 she was owned by J.Storrow of Middlesbrough and in 1883 James Knott became a part owner and manager. Wm. Milburn took over the management in 1888 and by 1890 she was no longer listed in Lloyds Register.

EUGENIE was a brig built around 1855 at Blyth with a tonnage of 239grt, a length of 105ft 4in and a beam of 25ft 6in. She was initially owned by G. D. Dawson of Hull who, in 1861, restyled himself as G. R. Dawson SS Co. James Knott was listed as the owner in 1883 and by 1887 she was no longer listed in Lloyds Register.

ISMYR was a brig built in 1850 by Thomas Royden at Prince Liverpool with a tonnage of 213grt, a length of 98ft 10in and a beam of 20ft 8in. Thomas Royden was one of the first British shipbuilders to incorporate the counter stern and the Ismyr was felted and coppered for the West Indies and South American trades. She was acquired by J.M.Cork of Liverpool in 1850 and by Thomas Royden in 1860 for the South American trade with Cork as manager. In 1871 she was purchased by Evans & Co. of Bideford as a slate carrier and after twelve years service in that trade passed to James Knott in 1883 and based at Newcastle. She passed to William Milburn in 1886 with the rest of the fleet and was broken up in 1890.

JOSEPH & MARGARET was a brig built in 1862 by Gray at Sunderland with a tonnage of 212grt, a length of 95ft 6in and a beam of 24ft 8in. She was built for J. Foster & Co. of Whitby and James Knott became the manager in 1883. Wm. Milburn took her over with the rest of the fleet in 1886 and in the following year she was sold to T. Robinson & C0. of Whitby. She was wrecked in 1888.

BREEZE was a snow rigged sailing ship built in 1859 by J. Short at Sunderland with a tonnage of 216grt, a length of 94ft and a beam of 24ft 6in. She was completed for T. Walker & Co. of South Shields and, in 1861, was sold to J. Reed of Sunderland. In 1882 James Knott was listed as the owner in Lloyds Register and in 1887 Wm. Milburn became her manager. All trace of her was lost in 1892.

CLARINDA was a brig built in 1850 by Hodgson & Gardner at Sunderland with a tonnage of 269grt, a length of 95ft 10in and a beam of 28ft. She was initially acquired by J. Douglas and in 1860 was owned by J. Allen of Great Yarmouth. Sold to S. Stracey of South Shields in 1878 James Knott became her manager in 1882. She passed to Wm. Milburn in 1884 and was no longer listed in 1886.

DOROTHY was a snow rigged sailing ship built around 1856 at Prince Sunderland with a tonnage of 235grt, a length of 91ft and a beam of 25ft 4in. She was initially owned by W. Stephenson of South Shields and by J. Walker of Sunderland in 1860. Registered as with James Knott in 1882 she passed to the management of Wm. Milburn 1887 and all trace of her was lost in 1889.

GEORGE FOX was a snow rigged sailing ship built in 1856 by Wilkinson & Andrews at Sunderland with a tonnage of 208grt, a length of 93ft and a beam of 25ft. She was built for W. S. Pallister & Co. of Sunderland. The company was taken over by Charles Pallister, the son, in 1882 and James Knott took over the management of his fleet. Wm. Milburn became the managers of the Pallister fleet in 1888 and she was deleted from the Lloyds Register in 1892.

THANKFUL was a snow rigged sailing ship built in 1857 by R. Thompson & Son at Sunderland with a tonnage of 214grt, a length of 93ft and a beam of 24ft 6in. Her initial owner is not known but in 1871 ownership was shown as W. Winship of Blyth who traded to the Baltic. James Knott became the ‘owner’ in 1882 and she was no longer registered in 1884.

HANNAH was a snow rigged sailing ship built in 1862 by J Robson at Sunderland with a tonnage of 243grt, a length of 99ft and a beam of 15ft 10in. She was initially registered as being owned by E. Humphries of Aberystwych. James Knott was registered as the owner in 1883 and Wm. Milburn took over the management in 1886. She was still registered as being with Wm. Milburn in 1889 but was deleted from the register in 1890.

CHOLMLEY was a snow rigged sailing ship built in 1853 by Turnbull at Whitby with a tonnage of 218grt, a length of 88ft and a beam of 21ft 1in. She was originally owned by Smales, Junior & Co. of Hartlepool who operated as a Cadiz wine trader. In 1871 her owner was recorded as G. Brambles of Hartlepool and by 1883 she was owned by Charles Pattinson of Newcastle with James Knott as manager. By 1886 Wm. Milburn was registered as her manager with Pattinson as her owner. She was scrapped in 1887.

MACEDONIAN was a snow rigged sailing ship built around 1854 by Lynn with a tonnage of 217grt, a length of 95ft 6in and a beam of 25ft. Her initial owner is not recorded but by 1861 she was owned by J. Crisp of Sunderland. By 1879 she was being used as a collier by E. Wilkinson of Blyth and in 1883 she was owned by Charles Pattinson of Newcastle with James Knott as her manager .In 1887 management was transferred to Wm. Milburn and after 1891all trace of her was lost.

BANFF was a snow rigged sailing ship built in 1867 by Stewart at Banff with a tonnage of 234grt, a length of 106ft 6in and a beam of 24ft 4in. She was initially owned by A. Leslie and was sold to J. Simpson of Banff in 1871. In 1879 ownership was recorded as T. Adams & Co. of Banff and in 1883 J. S. Simpson of Banff. James Knott was registered as the owner in 1884 and by 1886 Wm. Milburn was the manager. She was no longer registered by 1898.

WILLIAM & ANNIE was a brig built in 1868 by Macmillan at Prince Edward Island with a tonnage of 199grt, a length of 105ft and a beam of 23ft 11in. She was purchased by T.R.W. Mason of Swansea in October 1868 and by 1871 was owned by Mills & Co. In 1881 she was owned by Charles Pattinson of Newcastle with James Knott as manager and in 1886 was sold to A. Fellowes but still under the management of James Knott. She was transferred to the management of Wm. Milburn in 1887 and was sold to J. Boyes of Llanelli in 1890. After 1899 there was no further trace of her.

AERIEL was a brig built around 1839 at Sunderland with a tonnage of 252grt, a length of 90ft 7in and a beam of 25ft. Her original owners are not recorded but by 1878 she was registered as being owned by W. Baxter of Whitby. In 1884 James Knott was register as the owner and she was broken up in 1886 when Wm. Milburn was shown as the manager.

SARAH was a brig built around 1854 by at Southampton with a tonnage of 212grt, a length of 104ft 8in and a beam of 22ft 6in. Her original owners are not recorded but by 1869 she was registered as being owned by Robinson of Southampton. In 1879 she was sold to Hoad Bros. of Rye and in 1883 she was purchased by Charles Pattinson of Newcastle with James Knott as manager. She was broken in 1886.

Prince Line

STEAM SHIPS

SAXON PRINCE (1) was built in 1882 by C. S. Swan & Hunter at Newcastle with a tonnage of 832grt, a length of 215ft, a beam of 30ft 8in and a service speed of 9 knots. Registered at North Shields she was James Knott’s first steamship. On 11th July 1884 she was transferred to Prince Steam Shipping Co. Ltd. After eleven years service she was sold to Christian Salvesen of Leith and renamed Glitra in 1895. On 20th October 1914 she was stopped and scuttled by U-17 when 14 miles off Skudesnaes in Norway. She was supposedly the first merchant ship sunk by a submarine in World War 1.

SAILOR PRINCE (1) was built in 1882 by Hodgson & Soulsby at Blyth with a tonnage of 1303grt, a length of 242ft, a beam of 33ft 1in and a service speed of 9 knots. Delivered in July 1882 she was initially commanded by James Knott. She was transferred to Prince Line Shipping Co. Ltd on 11th July 1884 and in 1895 was sold to A & A Mackay of Grangemouth who renamed her Aberfoyle. In 1914 she was sold to G.N. Pittas Bros. & Co. of Pireaus, managed by D.N. Pittas and renamed Nicolaos. On 1st March 1917 she was torpedoed in the Mediterranean.

NORMAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1882 by Hodgson & Soulsby at Blyth with a tonnage of 1310grt, a length of 242ft, a beam of 33ft 1in and a service speed of 9 knots. Sister of the Sailor Prince she was completed for James Knott in October 1882 and transferred to Prince Steam Shipping Co. Ltd on 11th July 1884. In 1895 she was transferred to Prince Line (1895) Ltd and in December 1896 was sold to Christian Salvesen of Leith and renamed Logna. On 11th December 1898 she grounded on Haelfringe Reef at Axelsund in Sweden and was abandoned two days later.

SOLDIER PRINCE (1) was built in 1883 by Swan & Hunter at Newcastle with a tonnage of 1300grt, a length of 245ft 2in, a beam of 34ft 1in and a service speed of 9 knots. She was the first steel hulled ship built for James Knott and was transferred to Prince Steam Shipping Co. on 11th July 1884. In December 1896 she was sold to Christian Salvesen and renamed Folda. In June 1901 she ran aground near Wasa but was successfully salvaged. She was sold to Franco – British Steam Ship Co. of London, who retained her name, in May 1919. By 1920 she was trading as the City of Montdidier under the ownership of the Anglo – Celtic Shipping Co. of London. In 1922 she was purchased by the Hydra Steamship Co. of London who then sold her to Rederi A/B Majviken of Gothenburg who renamed her Maja. In 1929 she was sold to A/B John Millars Eftr of Gothenburg and placed under the management of E. Rundberg. On 4th July 1936 she was wrecked at Trysunda during a voyage from Hartlepool to Kopmanholmen.

CROWN PRINCE (1) was built in 1883 by Palmer & Co. at Jarrow with a tonnage of 1655grt, a length of 258ft 4in, a beam of 36ft 2in and a service speed of 9 knots. Similar in profile to the Soldier Prince she was completed for James Knott and transferred to Prince Steam Shipping Co. on 11th July 1884. In the following year she was transferred to Prince Line (1895) Ltd. She was sold to Dietrich Heydemann of Riga in 1903 and renamed Natalia. In the following year the name was amended to Natalie with Wiedau as her port of registry. By 1912 her managers were recorded as Harfe & Heydemann of Riga and on 13th February 1914 she was wrecked on Faludd, Gotland.

DANISH PRINCE was built in 1884 by J Readhead & Co. at South Shields with a tonnage of 1571grt, a length of 259ft, a beam of 36ft 1in and a service speed of 9 knots. Similar in profile to the Soldier Prince she was completed for James Knott, transferred to Prince Steam Shipping Co. on 11th July 1884 and to Prince Line (1895) Ltd on 28th February 1895. On 29th January 1897 she was lost on Cani Rocks in Tunisia.

THROPTON/SWEDISH PRINCE (1) was built in 1883 by C.S. Swan & Hunter at Newcastle with a tonnage of 1636grt, a length of 260ft, a beam of 35ft 2in and a service speed of 9 knots. Similar in profile to the Soldier Prince she was completed as the Thropton for R. B. Avery & Co. of Newcastle. She was acquired by James Knott in 1886 and continued to trade as the Thropton until 1890 when she was renamed Swedish Prince. In 1895 she was absorbed by Prince Line (1895) Ltd. She was sold to T.S. Blues & Co. of South Shields in 1902 and reverted to her former name. In 1904 she was sold to Akties Fjord with O. M. Milberg & Co. of Christiana as managers and renamed Fjord. On 28th February 1915 she was wrecked in Ardour Bay during a voyage to Bayonne with a cargo of coal.

OCEAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1885 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 1737grt, a length of 260ft, a beam of 37ft 1in and a service speed of 9 knots. Similar in profile to the Soldier Prince she was completed in July 1885 and transferred to Prince Line (1895) Ltd in 1898. She was sold to the Pernau Shipping Co. of Pernau, Russia in 1907 and renamed Pernau. On 1st March 1911 she was wrecked at Molle during a voyage from Sarpsberg to Riga..

IRON PRINCE was built in 1883 by C.S. Swan & Hunter at Newcastle with a tonnage of 1408grt, a length of 245ft, a beam of 34ft 1in and a service speed of 9 knots. She was completed for James Knott in September 1883 and transferred to Prince Line (1895) Ltd in 1895. She was sold to Dampschiff Ges. August Leonhardt GmbH of Hamburg with August Leonhardt as manager and renamed August Leonhardt. In the following year her managers were Leonhardt & Heecht of Hamburg and in 1904 she was sold to Emil R. Retzlaff of Stettin who renamed her Rudolf Retzlaff. In 1907she was sold to O. A. T. Skelbred of Kristiansand and renamed Egero by Akties Egero. She was sold again in September 1915 to Olsen & Ugelstad of Oslo who retained her name. On 4th March 1916 she sank after being in collision in the Downs off Kent. (Photo: World Ship Society)

BLACK PRINCE (1) was built in 1883 by Palmer & Co. at Jarrow with a tonnage of 1514grt, a length of 250ft 8in, a beam of 35ft 4in and a service speed of 9 knots. Similar to the Iron Prince she was built as the York Minster for Thomson & Pattinson of Newcastle and acquired by James Knott who renamed her Black Prince. On 11th July 1884 she was transferred to Prince Steam Shipping Co. In 1895 she was sold to D/S Heimdal of Copenhagen, with Martin Carl as manager, and renamed Kamma. Two years later she was acquired by N. P. Swensson of Helsingborg who retained her name and placed her under the management of Rederiakt Henckel. On 21st January 1917 she sank after striking a mine in the North Sea.

HIGHLAND PRINCE (1) was built in 1883 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 1466grt, a length of 240ft, a beam of 36ft 1in and a service speed of 9 knots. She was launched on 12th December 1883 for the Prince Steam Shipping Co. with James Knott as manager. Six years later she was sold to Bailey & Leetham of Hull and renamed Bona with Walter S. Bailey as manager. In 1896 her owners were recorded as being Bailey & Leetham Ltd. On 29th July 1903 she was transferred to Thos. Wilson, Sons & Co. of Hull who retained her name. She became the Teutonia on 7th January 1905 when she was sold to W. Kuntsman of Stettin. She was laid up at Stettin and decommissioned on 17th October 1930 and broken up in June 1934 by Stettiner Oderwerke of Stettin.

FALLODEN/STUART PRINCE (1) was built in 1883 by T & W Smith at North Shields with a tonnage of 1685grt, a length of 260ft, a beam of 29ft 10in and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was laid down for McNabb, Eeles & Co. of Newcastle but completed as the Falloden for James Knott. Renamed Stuart Prince in 1886 she was transferred to Prince Line (1895) Ltd on 28th February 1895. In 1897 she was sold to Societe Navale de L’Ouest of Le Havre and renamed St. Thomas. She was sold again in 1908 to Hudviksvalls Rederi AB of Hudviksvall and renamed Ariel. On 31st October 1912 she was lost after being in collision with Tammerfors owned by the Finnish company, Angfartygs AB Transito (H Wilsen, Managers), about 12 miles south of Olands Sodra Udde in the Baltic. (Photo: World Ship Society)

TUDOR PRINCE (1) was built in 1884 by J. L. Thompson & Son at Sunderland with a tonnage of 1480grt, a length of 245ft 2in, a beam of 35ft and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was completed for the Prince Steam Shipping Co. and transferred to Prince Line (1895) Ltd on 28th February 1895. In 1902 she was sold to Angfartygs Aktied Probus and renamed Probus with G. L. Ahlstrom as manager. She acquired by Red. Roslagen of Stockholm in 1909 who renamed her Roslagen with C. G. Thulin as manager. Ownership was subsequently recorded as J. Oberg of Stockholm in 1915 and A. Nilsson in 1920. In 1935 she was purchased by G. Roosvee and others of Tallin who renamed her Tonu. By 1944 she was being operated by Russian owners and subsequently broken up.

ROYAL PRINCE (1) was built in 1885 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 1803grt, a length of 260ft, a beam of 36ft 1in and a service speed of 9.5 knots. Sister of the Tudor Prince she was built for the Prince Steam Shipping Co. and entered service in April 1885. After 22 years service she was sold to G. Reid & Co’s Roman Steam Ship Co. of Newcastle and renamed Hadrian. In the following year ownership was recorded as being T. Pallister & Co. of Newcastle. On 11th January 1910 she sank in the River Humber after being in collision with H. Podeus’s Mecklenberg.

MERCHANT PRINCE (1) was built in 1883 by H. S. Edwards, Sons & Craig at Howden with a tonnage of 1622grt, a length of 260ft, a beam of 36ft 2in and a service speed of 9.5 knots. Completed in October 1883 she remained with the company until 1900 when she was sold to Red. Neptunus of Halsingborg with W. Wingardh as managers and renamed Najarden. In 1918 she was operating as the Sylvia for Red. A/B Sylvia with A. Billner as manager. In 1920 she was sold to Red. Svenska Lloyd of Gothenburg with H. Metcalf as manager retaining her name. Ten years later she was sold to Rederi A/B “Sylvia” of Gothenburg and managed by P. Nyman. On 9th January 1940 she set sail from Hull bound for Gothenburg and was last seen off Aberdeen. One body was later recovered from a life raft.

WELSH PRINCE (1) was built in 1883 by Swan & Hunter at Newcastle with a tonnage of 897grt, a length of 215ft 2in, a beam of 30ft 10in and a service speed of 9 knots. She was completed as the Tyneside for Gustav Reich of Newcastle and acquired by James Knott during the same year and renamed Welsh Prince. In 1892 she was sold to C. Gerolimich of Trieste and renamed Quarnero. Five years later she was purchased by Akties. Damp. ‘Rebekka’ of Drontheim, with A. W. Selmer as manager, and renamed Rebekka. She was acquired by T. Halversen of Bergen in 1913 and renamed Jern. In 1936 she was sold to O. Ostenjo of Bergen who retained her name and on 28th September 1939 she was torpedoed by U-7 in the North Sea. This was an unfortunate accident as the ship had a grey painted hull and compensation was later paid.

INDIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1886 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 1912grt, a length of 275ft, a beam of 38ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Built for Prince Steam Shipping Company she was transferred to Prince Line Ltd in 1898. In 1907 she was sold to Ross, Allen & Johnston of Glasgow and renamed Burndyke. Eight years later she was sold to H. Harrison of London for use as a collier. Renamed Caterham in line with the company’s policy to name their ships after London suburbs she was operated by the Caterham Steam Ship Co. and usually chartered to the Gas Light & Coke Company. On 13th November 1915 she was stopped by UB-38 and sunk by bombs when 15 miles off Beachy Head.

WENSLEYDALE was built in 1872 by Robert Thompson Jr. at Southwick with a tonnage of 1160grt, a length of 231ft 4in, a beam of 31ft 5in and a service speed of 9 knots. She was built for Milburn Bros. of South Shields and acquired by James Knott in 1886 for personal use. In 1895 she was sold to C. A. Banck & Co. of Helsingborg and renamed Capella. On 15th July 1898 during a voyage from Hull to Malmo she foundered in the North Sea.

PERSIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1888 by Craig, Taylor & Co. at Stockton with a tonnage of 2284grt, a length of 273ft, a beam of 40ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Laid down as the Iviecliffe she was acquired in November 1888 and renamed Persian Prince. In 1911 she was sold to Red. Trelleborg of Trelleborg with G. Osterberg as manager and renamed Svecia. During a voyage from Liverpool to Aarhus in February 1915 she was posted as missing after having been seen passing Cape Wrath on 2nd February.

LOCKTON/AFRICAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1882 by Kish, Boolds & Co. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 1219grt, a length of 240ft, a beam of 34ft 1in and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was completed as the Lockton for J. B. Hick & Co. of Scarborough and acquired by James Knott in 1887. Trading with her original name for a further three years she was renamed African Prince in 1890. In 1895 she was sold to R. Mackie & Co. of Leith for operation by the New Line Steam Ship Co. as the Newport. Nineteen years later she was purchased by Red. Svenoke of Stockholm and renamed Brynhild for management by K. Aucher. On 2nd December 1915 she was wrecked off Grisselhamn during a voyage from Stockholm to Raumo.

ROMAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1887 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 1934grt, a length of 290ft, a beam of 38ft 10in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed in August 1887 and remained with the company until 1910 when she was sold to Cia Commercio e Navegacao of Rio de Janeiro and renamed Gurupy. In 1923 the company was known as Pereira, Carneiro & Cia Ltda. but in 1935 it had reverted to the former name. She was taken out of service in 1945 and broken up.

SCOTTISH PRINCE (1) was built in 1888 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 1958grt, a length of 260ft, a beam of 36ft 1in and a service speed of 9.5 knots. Sister of the Scottish Prince she remained with the company until 1908 when she was sold to Gebrudder Seeburg of Riga who renamed her General Suworow. On 5th August 1919 she was wrecked at Flakstal, Vest Fjorden, Lofoten Islands during a voyage from Archangel to the Tyne in ballast. All nineteen crew and a dog were saved. At the time she was transiting the safer inland passage.

EASTERN PRINCE (1) was built in 1887 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2147grt, a length of 292ft 7in, a beam of 39ft and a service speed of 10 knots. Completed in November 1887 she remained with the company for 20 years until 1907 when she was sold to Wilson & Watson of Newcastle who were, in fact, shipbrokers and not shipowners. In the following year she was sold to George Reid & Co. of Newcastle who renamed her Vespasian and quickly resold her to the Parsons Marine Steam Turbine Co. They installed two experimental steam turbines with twin single reduction reducing from 1450 rpm down to 53 rpm but the severe reduction ratio created serious technical problems. It wasn’t until 1917 that the double reduction geared engine opened up unlimited reduction possibilities and higher speeds. However, slower speed single reduction ships began to be built. The Vespasian was sold to Cairns, Noble & Co. of Newcastle who already had the Cairncross which was powered by Doxford turbines, and was broken up in 1914. (Photo: World Ship Society)

ASIATIC PRINCE (1) was built in 1888 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2183grt, a length of 292ft 7in, a beam of 39ft and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Eastern Prince she was completed in July 1888 and remained with the company until 1908 when she was sold to G. Coulouras of Syra and renamed Massalia. Coulouras went into receivership during the same year and she was sold, together with his other ship Miaoulas, to E. Petritzis Fils of Syra. On 29th October 1916 she was torpedoed by U-63 west of Gibraltar. (Photo: World Ship Society)

BRITISH PRINCE (1) was built in 1888 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2217grt, a length of 292ft 7in, a beam of 39ft and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Eastern Prince she traded with the company until 1910 when she was sold to Cia. Commercio e Navagacao of Rio de Janeiro who renamed her Mucury. She was broken up in 1936.

RUSSIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1888 by Sir W. G. Armstrong, Mitchell & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 2716grt, a length of 310ft, a beam of 40ft 5in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was the first oil tanker built for James Knott and the largest vessel to date. In 1912 she was sold to S. A. d’Armament, d’Industrie & de Commerce of Antwerp and renamed Kasbek. On 4th August 1918 she rescued the survivors of the Clan Macnab which had been torpedoed by U-133 14 miles off the Pendeen Light. As a mark of thanks the Government presented the master with a silver goblet and Cayzer Irvine the ship’s owners donated a cash sum to be divided among the crew. In 1921 she was sold to Petroleos Porto-Pi S. A. of Barcelona who renamed her Eduardo. She was withdrawn from service in 1936 and broken up in the following year. (Photo: World Ship Society)

CIRCASSIAN PRINCE was built in 1889 by C.S. Swan, Hunter & Co. at Wallsend with a tonnage of 2243grt, a length of 272ft 7in, a beam of 38ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. A slightly smaller version of the Russian Prince she was James Knott’s second oil tanker. She undertook her maiden voyage in ballast from Newcastle to New York where she arrived on 2nd June 1889 having completed James Knott’s first UK – USA sailing. In 1902 she was sold to W. Keswick & Co. of London but maintained her port of registry as Newcastle. By 1910 she was owned by the London & Pacific Petroleum Co. of London with W. Keswick as manager. In 1916 she was sold to the International Petroleum Co. of Toronto and in November 1922 she was towed out of Talara, Peru and scuttled.

ORANJE PRINCE was built in 1889 by Sir W.G. Armstrong, Mitchell & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 1868grt, a length of 260ft, a beam of 36ft and a service speed of 10 knots. She was the third tanker built for James Knott and remained in service until 1907 when she was sold to Akties. ‘Helios’ of Tonsberg with H. Hauan as manager and renamed Helios. On 5th April 1908 she was abandoned when she foundered in the North Atlantic during a voyage from Philadelphia to Bordeaux.

MOORISH PRINCE (1) was built in 1889 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2261grt, a length of 299ft, a beam of 39ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was delivered in June 1889 to Prince Steam Shipping Co. with James Knott as manager. In 1910 she was sold to Cia. Commercio e Navegacao of Rio de Janeiro and renamed Ypiranga. On 25th September 1911 she sank in heavy weather off Imbituba in Brazil.

ARABIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1889 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2265grt, a length of 300ft 6in, a beam of 39ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Moorish Prince she entered service in October 1889 and on 19th November 1890 inaugurated the company’s Mediterranean to New York service from Livorno via Catania, Messina and Palermo. In 1900 she was renamed Nentwater when sold to Nentwater Shipping Co. of South Shields and managed by T. Gentles & Sons. In the following year she was sold to J.A. Parker of Cardiff’s The Fairwater Shipping Co. and in 1906 to Otto Banck of Helsingborg retaining her name throughout. Otto Banck renamed her Nora in 1910 and on 26th November 1913 she was wrecked in fog on Finngrund near Gelfe.

GRECIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1890 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2204grt, a length of 292ft, a beam of 39ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Moorish Prince she entered service in January 1890 and was transferred to Prince Line (1895) Ltd on 28th February 1895. She was sold to Cia. San Paulista de Nav. e Commercia of San Paulo in 1910 and renamed Piratininga. She was taken over by the Brazilian Governement in 1915 and renamed Sargento Albuquerque for use as a supply ship and was broken up in 1930.

HIGHLAND PRINCE (2) was built in 1890 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2510grt, a length of 290ft, a beam of 40ft and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Moorish Prince she entered service in September 1890 and was transferred to Prince Line (1895) Ltd on 28th February 1895. She was sold to T. Pangalos of Piraeus in1912 who renamed her Evangelos and in 1915 to O.M. Milberg & Co. of Oslo who changed her name to Lyngfjord. In the following year she was acquired by Akties Vestland of Oslo with J. Leborg as manager and renamed Stortind. On 2nd September 1918 she was torpedoed off the Azores in the Atlantic. (Photo: World Ship Society)

Prince Line

BELGIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1888 by Ailsa Shipbuilding Co. at Troon with a tonnage of 1266grt, a length of 231ft 2in, a beam of 33ft 2in and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was completed as the Lady Ailsa for J & A Wylie of London and acquired by James Knott in 1890. In 1897 she was sold to F.H. Powell & Co. of London who renamed her Hopeful. On 13th February 1902 she was lost off the Longships Light following a collision during a voyage from Liverpool to Plymouth.

KAFFIR PRINCE was built in 1891 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2228grt, a length of 292ft 6in, a beam of 38ft 7in and a service speed of 10 knots. She entered service in December 1891 and started a trend whereby ships were built with a clipper bow. In 1919 she was sold to Pandelis Bros. of Piraeus and renamed Propontis. Five years later she was transferred to Pandelis Bros. Ltd. of London and the British flag without a change of name. In 1926 she was sold to Mrs Zeinabbent Khalil Mourad el Geretly of Alexandria and in 1928 was renamed Nafe by Mohamed Effendi Nafe, also of Alexandria. She was broken up in 1933 at Thomas Cook’s old works at Boulac, Alexandria. (Photo: Laurence Dunn Collection)

CREOLE PRINCE was built in 1893 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2047grt, a length of 282ft, a beam of 37ft 8in and a service speed of 10 knots. Completed in May 1893 she was transferred to Prince Line (1895) Ltd in 1895. On 21st October 1916 she sank six miles west of Cape Spartel, Morocco after being in collision with HMS Narcissus in fog. (Photo: York)

CARIB PRINCE was built in 1893 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2048grt, a length of 282ft, a beam of 37ft 8in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Creole Prince she was, on completion, deployed on the Mediterranean to New York service. Transferred to Prince Line Ltd in 1898 she remained with the company until 1922 when she was sold to J.S. Coulis of Pireaus and renamed Fani. In the following year she was acquired by A.D. Tchirkovitch of Istanbul who renamed her Mikhail Archangel. She was sold again in 1926 to Barzilay & Benjamin of Istanbul who initially renamed her Choule and then corrected it to Sule. Two years later she was sold to T.C. Munakalat Vekeleti Denizollari ve Liman I.U.M. of Istanbul and by 1950 she was no longer listed in Lloyds Register.

EGYPTIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1879 by M. Pearse & Co. at Stockton with a tonnage of 1910grt, a length of 275ft, a beam of 35ft 6in and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was built as the Argosy for the United Steam Shipping Co. of London and managed by J. Temperley & Co. which was the remnants of the Temperley Line (British Colonial Steamship Co.) She was one of three United ships acquired by James Knott in 1893 and renamed Egyptian Prince. Transferred to Prince Line Ltd in 1898 she was sold in 1900 to E. Bozzo of Genoa who renamed her Luigino. In 1908 she was sold to F. Suarez of Heulva for use as an iron ore carrier and renamed San Fernando. On 14th April 1911 she foundered in the Bay of Biscay during a voyage to Garston.

SARDINIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1882 by C.S. Swan & Hunter at Newcastle with a tonnage of 2453grt, a length of 317ft, a beam of 38ft and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was built as the Brookfield for the United Steam Shipping Co. of London and managed by J. Temperley & Co. which was the remnants of the Temperley Line (British Colonial Steamship Co.) She was one of three United ships acquired by James Knott in 1893 and renamed Sardintian Prince. In 1901 she was sold to Akties. ‘Carl’. with George T. Monsen as manager and renamed Carl. Three years later, in 1904, she was acquired by K. Kishimoto of Hamadera and renamed Shinko Maru. On 17th June 1912 she was wrecked on Rebun Island, Hokkaido.

TURKISH PRINCE was built in 1879 by Charles Mitchell & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 1986grt, a length of 286ft, a beam of 35ft 1in and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was built as the Inchmornish for Hamilton, Fraser & Co. of Liverpool and purchased by the United Steam Shipping Co. in 1890, renamed Briggella and managed by J. Temperley & Co. which was the remnants of the Temperley Line (British Colonial Steamship Co.) She was one of three United ships acquired by James Knott in 1893 and renamed Turkish Prince. On 16th September 1897 she was wrecked on the Yucatan Peninsular during a voyage from Genoa to Vera Cruz.

IMPERIAL PRINCE (1) was built in 1890 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2525grt, a length of 293ft 6in, a beam of 40ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Completed in July 1890 she was transferred to Prince Line (1895) Ltd on 28th February 1895. In 1913 she was sold to Hine Bros. of Maryport for operation by the The Holme Line Steamship Co. as the Myrtle Holme. She was acquired by Goshi Kaisha Kishimoto Shokai of Kishimoto in February 1915 and renamed Yeirako Maru. On 11th April 1915 she was wrecked on Amherst Rocks in the China Sea.

SPANISH PRINCE (1) was built in 1882 by Hodgson & Soulsby at Blyth with a tonnage of 1783grt, a length of 265ft, a beam of 36ft 1in and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was built as the Castlehill for Tomlinson, Thomson & Co. of Liverpool and by 1886 was owned by the Castlehill Steamship Co. of Liverpool with James Little & Co. as managers. In 1888 the company was sold to R.H. Wesencraft & Co. of Newcastle who retained her name. Acquired by James Knott in 1892 and renamed Spanish Prince she was sold three years later to A Bianchi fu M of Spezia who changed her name to Buenos Aires. In 1902 she was acquired by P. Lagomaggiore fu L of Genoa and managed by O. Macera as the Tigullio. Four years later she was owned by D & E Fratelli Bozzo of Genoa and operating as the Espero. Without any change of name she was sold to Conti, Giorgi & Co. in 1912 and to Luigi Ghirardi of Genoa in 1914. After a further ten years service she was broken up in 1924.

CASTILIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1893 by C.S. Swan & Hunter at Newcastle with a tonnage of 2316grt, a length of 290ft 7in, a beam of 38ft 8in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was built for the Prince Steam Shipping Co. On 27th December 1899 she was damaged after being in collision with the Amphitrite in the Rio Parana. She was sold to Booker Bros. of Liverpool in 1912 and renamed Amakura. On 12th June 1917, during a voyage from Liverpool to Demerara, she was torpedoed by U-94 west of Tory Island with the loss of 2 lives.

BEA BELLIDO/SYRIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1893 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 1914grt, a length of 277ft, a beam of 37ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed as the Bea Bellido for Prince Steam Shipping Co. and renamed Syrian Prince in 1896. In 1910 she was sold to Cia. Marittima Siciliana of Messina who renamed her Suez and two years later to Charilaos, Goudis of Piraeus who changed her name to Epaminondas and placed her under the management of N. Goudis. By 1916 she was trading as the Marie Carossi and on 20th November of that year she capsized and sank. (Photo: York)

MEXICAN PRINCE was built in 1893 by C.S. Swan & Hunter at Newcastle with a tonnage of 3028grt, a length of 328ft 4in, a beam of 41ft and a service speed of 10 knots. She was an oil tanker delivered in September 1893 and which remained with the company until 1919 when she was sold to the Southern Whaling & Sealing Co. of Liverpool who renamed her Southern Isles. In 1930 she was sold to Cia de Combustivels de Lobito of Lobitos for use as an oil depot ship at that port and later at Lisbon with the name Silva Porto. She was sold to Thos. W. Ward in 1937 and in January of the following year was towed to Pembroke Dock where she was broken up.

GEORGIAN PRINCE was built in 1893 by Sir W.G. Armstrong, Whitworth & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 3245grt, a length of 328ft 4in, a beam of 41ft and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Mexican Prince she was delivered in November 1893 and stayed with the company until May 1918 when she was sold to Anglo-Iranian Oil Co’s British Tanker Co. and renamed British General. In 1922 she was sold to Cia Vasco Valenciana de Nav. of Bilboa, renamed Ebros and later used as a depot ship. She was broken up in Spain during 1940.

CHINESE PRINCE (1) was built in 1883 by Edward Withy & Co. at West Hartlepool with a tonnage of 2111grt, a length of 285ft 4in, a beam of 36ft and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed in September 1883 as the China for the City of Liverpool Steam Navigation Co. and was the sister of Furness Withy’s Newcastle City. In 1889 she was transferred to Belfast Shipowners Co. and purchased by James Knott in 1893 and renamed Chinese Prince. Two years later she was acquired by Bertollo & Vaccaro of Genoa and renamed Concordia. In 1906 she was sold to T. Gazzolo fu A. of Genoa and renamed Concezione. On 19th November 1916 she foundered 12 miles off Puerta Ventura.

TUSCAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1881 by M Pearse & Co. at Stockton with a tonnage of 1653grt, a length of 260ft 4in, a beam of 33ft 8in and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was completed in June 1881as the Miranda for Herskind & Woods of West Hartlepool and acquired by James Knott in 1893 who renamed her Tuscan Prince. In 1906 she was sold to P. Schiaffino fu G.B. of Genoa and renamed Provvidenza. On 11th November 1908 she developed a leak and was abandoned off Cape Villano during a voyage from Cardiff to Tunis with a cargo of coal.

TARTAR PRINCE (1) was built in 1895 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 3272grt, a length of 342ft 8in, a beam of 43ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Delivered in January 1895 she was advertised as having a ‘saloon amidship, bathrooms, electric light’ and commenced her maiden voyage on 26th September from London to Buenos Aires via Montevideo and Rosario. On 27th February 1897 she made her final voyage on that route before sailing from Newcastle to New York to commence the New York – Naples – Genoa – Livorno service. In July 1902 she was transferred to the New York – South Africa service. On 25th November 1902, on only her second voyage on that route, she caught fire and was lost during a voyage from New York to East London.

TROJAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1896 by J. Readhead & Sons at South Shields with a tonnage of 3273grt, a length of 351ft 4in, a beam of 44ft 7in and a service speed of 10 knots. Launched on the 14th May 1896 she commenced her maiden voyage from London to Buenos Aires via Montevideo and Rosario on 30th July. She made her final sailing on that route on 16th February 1897 before commencing the New York – Naples – Genoa – Livorno service, completing 6 round voyages annually. On 25th May 1903 she made her final sailing from Genoa to New York during which she had to put into Gibraltar with a damaged propeller. With the need for a replacement her steerage passengers were transferred to the Sicilian Prince and she was towed to Marseilles. On 23rd February 1917 she was torpedoed by U-395 off Cape Shershel with the loss of two lives whilst bound for Alexandria.

SPARTAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1899 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 3299grt, a length of 351ft, a beam of 44ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. Completed for Prince Steam Shipping Company she was incorporated into the Prince Line Ltd and deployed on the New York to Italy service. On 29th August 1908 she was lost after colliding with a barque during a voyage from New York to the River Plate.

LANCASTRIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1881 by Palmers Co.. at Jarrow with a tonnage of 1747grt, a length of 262ft, a beam of 35ft 2in and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was completed in July 1881 as the Lancaster for Steam Ship Lancaster Co. of Liverpool with G.M. Steeves as manager. Acquired in 1893 she was renamed Lancastrian Prince. On 22nd September 1895 during a voyage to Kingston she was lost on Morant Cays.

ITALIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1893 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 3083grt, a length of 338ft 11in, a beam of 42ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed in September 1893 and remained with the company until 10th November 1920 when she was destroyed by fire at Limassol. Although beached she was declared a total loss.

PORTUGUESE PRINCE (1) was built in 1881 by Andrew Leslie & Co. at Hebburn with a tonnage of 2179grt, a length of 320ft, a beam of 35ft 10in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed in January 1881 as the Saint Dunstan for the British & Foreign Steamship Co. with Rankin & Gilmour & Co.as managers. Bought by James Knott and renamed Portuguese Prince in 1893 she remained with Prince Line until 1900 when she was sold to E. Morteo fu A of Genoa who changed her named to Monte Rosa. In the following year she was acquired by C. Marchesa of Genoa who renamed her Luigia. On 21st March 1904 she was wrecked on Penal Point in Corsica during a voyage from Novorossisk to Marseilles.

ASTURIAN PRINCE was built in 1893 by John Readhead & Sons. at South Shields with a tonnage of 3301grt, a length of 336ft, a beam of 42ft and a service speed of 10 knots. In June 1895 she was damaged following a grounding near Curacao and after being salvaged was sold cheaply to Thomas Hogan’s Miami Steamship Co. of New York. and renamed Matteawan. During 1898 she was chartered to the US Government for deployment during the war with Spain. In 1899 she was placed on the New York to Galveston to competed with the more powerful Mallory Steamship Co. but the venture was not a success. She was sold to the Saginaw Steel Co. in 1900 for management by J. H. Starin. On 2nd December 1901 she sailed from Nanaimo with a cargo of coal and was never seen again.

AFGHAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1894 by Robert Stephenson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 3261grt, a length of 344ft 7in, a beam of 43ft 1in and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was completed in 1894 for the Prince Line Steam Shipping Insurance Association and transferred to Prince Line Ltd in 1898. In the following year she was sold to R.P. Houston & Co and renamed Hilarius. In 1919 she was acquired by N.G. Livanos of Piraeus who renamed her Livanos. On 27th August 1923 she was wrecked on Perduto Island in the Strait of Bonifacio during a voyage from Follonica in Italy to Hamburg.

SPANISH PRINCE (2) was built in 1886 by R & W Hawthorn, Leslie & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 3109grt, a length of 353ft, a beam of 39ft 5in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was launched on 20th April 1886 as the Port Pirie for Wm. Milburn’s Anglo-Australasian Steam Navigation Co. and chartered to Allport & Hughes. Acquired by Prince Steam Shipping Company and renamed Spanish Prince in 1897 she was transferred to Prince Line Ltd in 1898 and placed on the Black Sea and Levant trade. In 1900 she was sold to Cia. Cantabrica de Nav. of Bilbao with Orbe & Gorbeo as managers and renamed Guernica. On 10th February 1902 she foundered in the Bay of Biscay during a voyage from Cardiff to Genoa.

CYPRIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1878 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 1888grt, a length of 274ft 6in, a beam of 36ft and a service speed of 9.5 knots. Completed as the Cyprus for Taylor & Sanderson Ltd. of Sunderland she was sold to Thos. Ronaldson & Co. of London for operation by their Sunniside Steam Ship Co. Thos. Ronaldson & Co. was formerly known as Adamson & Ronaldson until J. W. Adamson retired and traded as the Puritan Line. The Cyprus traded between Antwerp and Boston until replaced by the English King in 1899. She was acquired by Prince Line in 1899 and renamed Cyprian Prince. On 31st July 1908 she was wrecked at Farilhoes in Portugal whilst in fog.

DUTCH PRINCE was built in 1894 by Russell & Co. at Port Glasgow with a tonnage of 4992grt, a length of 396ft, a beam of 48ft 8in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed as the Strathgarry for Burrell & Son of Glasgow and acquired by Prince Line Ltd in 1899. The company’s largest ship at the time she was renamed Dutch Prince. In 1900 she was sold to Andrew Weir & Co. for operation by the Steam Ship Wyneric Co. Ltd as the Wyneric. On 15th April 1913 she sailed from Baltimore bound for Guayaquil with a cargo of coal and dynamite. She passed the Triton Bank in the Straits of Magellan on 10th May and was never seen again.

SAXON PRINCE (2) was built in 1899 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 3471grt, a length of 352ft 7in, a beam of 45ft 7in and a service speed of 10 knots. Built for Prince Line Ltd she entered service in July 1899. On 25th February 1916 she was captured by the German auxiliary cruiser Mowe 620 miles west of Fastnet and sunk with explosives. The Mowe was on her first operation and had already laid 252 mines off the Pentland Firth, one of which sank the battleship HMS Edward VII. The Saxon Prince was the 15th and last victim of that first operation.

NORMAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1900 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 3464grt, a length of 274ft 6in, a beam of 36ft and a service speed of 9.5 knots. Sister of the Saxon Prince she was delivered to Prince Line Ltd in May 1900. In 1920 she was sold to G. Coulouras of Hydra, renamed Hydra and broken up In Italy during April 1933.

SAILOR PRINCE (2) was built in 1901 by Wm. Dobson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 3119grt, a length of 331ft 6in, a beam of 44ft 3in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed for Prince Line Ltd with James Knott as manager in September 1901. On 2nd October 1915, during a voyage from Cyprus to Leith, she was sunk by gunfire from U-39 when 36 miles from Cape Sidero in Crete with the loss of 2 lives. (Photo: World Ship Society)

SOLDIER PRINCE (2) was built in 1901 by Wm. Dobson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 3118grt, a length of 331ft 6in, a beam of 44ft 3in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Sailor Prince she entered service in December 1901 and remained with the company until June 1932 when she was broken up by Smith & Houston at Port Glasgow. (Photo: FW Hawks)

MERCHANT PRINCE (2) was built in 1902 by Wm. Dobson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 3092grt, a length of 331ft 6in, a beam of 44ft 3in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Sailor Prince she was delivered in January 1902. In 1922 she was sold to F. Lyras of Chios, renamed Lyras and was broken up in February 1936 by Van Heyghen Freres at Ghent.

EGYPTIAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1902 by Blyth Shipbuilding Co. at Blyth with a tonnage of 3096grt, a length of 330ft 6in, a beam of 44ft 3in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Sailor Prince she was completed for Prince Line Ltd. On 12th May 1917, during a voyage from Alexandria to Manchester, she was captured and sunk with Explosives by U-38 when 250 miles southeast of Malta.

NAPOLITAN PRINCE was built in 1889 by Scott & Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 3198grt, a length of 363ft 6in, a beam of 42ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was launched in August 1889 as the Rei de Portugal for the Mala Real Portugueza’s mail service to Portugal’s African colonies. When she entered service in February 1890 the route was not a success as she was competing against Cia Nacional. In 1902 she was acquired by Prince Line for the Livorno-Genoa-Naples- Palermo-New York service and renamed Napolitan Prince. After nine years service she was sold to Cie. de Navigation Mixte of Marseilles in November 1911 and renamed Manouba. She was subsequently modernised and continued with Mixte until 14th February 1929 when she was sold for demolition in Italy.

SICILIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1889 by Scott & Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 3199grt, a length of 363ft 6in, a beam of 42ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Napolitan Prince she was launched in November 1889 as the Mocambique for Mala Real Portugeza. Like her sister, when she entered service in March 1900 she failed to compete with the Cia. Nacional and in 1902 was sold to W. MacAndrew of Lisbon who renamed her Alvarez Cabral. MacAndrew’s sold her immediately to Prince Line for their Livorno-Genoa-Naples-Palermo-New York service and on 30th September 1902 commenced her first sailing as the Sicilian Prince. She began her final sailing on 18th March 1908 before being chartered to Northwest Transport on 12th December for whom she made four round voyages from Rotterdam to New York with a call at Halifax. In June 1910 she was sold to Khedivial Steam Ship & Graving Dock Co. of London and was renamed Abbassieh for management by Lord Edward Hamilton. After a further twenty one years service she was broken up in Italy during 1931.

TUDOR PRINCE (2) was built in 1903 by Sunderland Shipbuilding Co. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4208grt, a length of 360ft, a beam of 48ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Entering service in January 1903 she remained with the company until 1923 when she was sold to N. Th. Bulgaris & Partners of Andros who renamed her Theodoros Bulgaris. On 31st December she was on a voyage from Constanza to Hamburg with a cargo of grain when she developed a list in the Bay of Biscay and was abandoned before she capsized and sank.

AFRICAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1903 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4916grt, a length of 410ft 1in, a beam of 52ft 1in and a service speed of 11 knots. Launched on 12th February 1903 she entered service in the following May. On 21st July 1917 during a voyage from Liverpool to Newport News she was torpedoed by U-66 60 miles northwest of Tory Island.

AFGHAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1903 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4923grt, a length of 410ft 2in, a beam of 52ft 1in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the African Prince she was launched on 26th June 1903 and entered service in the following August. On 30th July 1918 she was wrecked near Cape Gabarius on the coast of Nova Scotia.

WELSH PRINCE (2) was built in 1903 by R. Craggs & Sons at Middlesbrough with a tonnage of 4934grt, a length of 410ft 2in, a beam of 52ft 1in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the African Prince she entered service in October 1903. On 13th October 1916 she was torpedoed by U-43 when 33 miles southwest of Cape Matapan in Greece. (Photo: E Johnson)

CROWN PRINCE (2) was built in 1904 by Wm. Dobson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 2539grt, a length of 325ft, a beam of 45ft 4in and a service speed of 10 knots. Delivered in April 1904 her career lasted only 6 years. On 16th October 1910 during a voyage from Santos to New Orleans with a cargo of coffee she was wrecked at Hatandes Point in Cuba.

BLACK PRINCE (2) was built in 1903 by Russell & Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 3925grt, a length of 345ft 2in, a beam of 49ft 11in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed as the Provan for J. Lockie & Co. of Newcastle in January 1903 and purchased by Prince Line Ltd and renamed Black Prince in 1904. In 1922 she was sold to Naviera Guadalquivir S. A. of Seville with J. Orelana as manager and renamed Guardiaro. Fourteen years later she was acquired by Perez & Echevarrieta of Bilboa who renamed her Udondo and two years later, in 1938, she was purchased by Pedro Perez Gante of Bilbao for use during the Spanish Civil War as the Gante. In the following year she was sold to Jose de Navas Escuder of Bilbao and renamed Albareda. She was sold to Transportes Aduanas y Consignaciones S.A. of Barcelona, renamed Sac Coruna, and after a further fifteen years service was broken up at Barcelona during February 1965.

BELGIAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1885 by Sir W.G. Armstrong, Mitchell at Newcastle with a tonnage of 2831grt, a length of 310ft 6in, a beam of 39ft and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was completed in November 1885 as the Hajeen for the Bedouin Steam Navigation Co. of Liverpool, with W & R Thomson as manager, and in 1900 was acquired by Aznar y Cia of Bilbao who renamed her Berriz. In 1907, when in need of engine repairs, she was purchased by the Wallsend Slipway & Engine Co., renamed Belgian Prince and placed under the management of James Knott. In 1910 she was sold to Haldor Virik and renamed Normanna for operation by Hvalfangerakties Normanna of Sandfjord. On 22nd February 1917 she was torpedoed off the Scilly Isles.

PIEDMONTESE PRINCE/RE D’ITALIA was built in 1907 by Sir James Laing & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 6149grt, a length of 430ft, a beam of 52ft 8in and a service speed of 14 knots. She was laid down as the Piedmontese Prince but acquired on the stocks by Lloyd Sabaudo Soc. Anon de Nav. of Genoa when Prince Line withdrew from the Italy-New York service. Launched on the 22nd December 1906 as the Re d’Italia she commenced her maiden voyage on 6th April 1907 from Genoa to New York with calls at Naples and Palermo. During December 1908 she was used as a hospital ship at Messina following the earthquake. On 26th September 1911 she began a fourteen month spell as a hospital ship during the Italo-Turkish war. With 13 medical staff and accommodation for 116 patients she served between Italy and Libya and evacuated 36,983 sick and wounded. In 1912 she made a solitary voyage to Constantinople. In 1920 her accommodation was reduced to first and third class only and in the following year she was transferred to the South American service. After a further eight years service she was broken up in 1929 at Genoa.

SARDINIAN PRINCE (2)/REGINA D’ITALIA was built in 1907 by Sir James Laing & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 6149grt, a length of 430ft, a beam of 52ft 8in and a service speed of 14 knots. Sister of the Piedmontese Prince she was laid down as the Sardinian Prince but acquired on the stocks by Lloyd Sabaudo Soc. Anon de Nav. of Genoa when Prince Line withdrew from the Italy-New York service. Launched on the 20th January 1907 as the Regina d’Italia she commenced her maiden voyage on 15th May 1907 from Genoa to New York and on the following 6th October inaugurated the company’s Genoa to South America service as the Tomaso di Savoia was not ready in time.. During December 1908, together with her sister, she was used as a hospital ship at Messina following the earthquake. During 1911 she served as a hospital ship during the Italo-Turkish war between Benghazi and Derna. In 1920 her accommodation was reduced to first and third class only and in 1922 she was transferred to the South American service. After a further six years service she was broken up in October 1928 at Genoa.

SPANISH PRINCE (2) was built in 1894 by Chas. Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 6505grt, a length of 450ft, a beam of 52ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. She was launched on 6th June 1894 and completed in the following August as the Knight Batchelor for Greenshields, Cowie & Co. of Liverpool, a company whose history goes back to 1795. On 26th April 1897, during a voyage from Cardiff to Norfolk, she hit an iceberg and limped into Halifax four days later with 30 feet of her bow missing. Repairs cost $30,000. She was acquired by Prince Line in 1907 for £35,000 and, as the Spanish Prince, was the company’s largest ship and remained so until 1918. On 5th October 1914, whilst in St. Nazaire Roads, she sustained damage to her hull when her anchor chain broke and she grounded. She was subsequently acquired by the Admiralty and on 15th February 1915 was sunk as a block ship in the western entrance to Dover Harbour. A permanent wreck buoy marks the spot.

SWEDISH PRINCE (2) was built in 1896 by J. L. Thompson & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 3712grt, a length of 356ft, a beam of 48ft 6in and a service speed of 10.5 knots. She was completed in July 1896 as the Howick Hall for Charles D. Dunn & Co. of Liverpool’s Globe Shipping Co. Purchased by Prince Line in 1907 she was renamed Swedish Prince. On 17th August 1916 she was sunk by gunfire from U-35 near to Pantellaria during a voyage from Salonika to Bizerta. One crew member lost his life and the Master, Chief Engineer and a gunner were taken prisoner.

CORSICAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1900 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2776grt, a length of 316ft, a beam of 42ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed in April 1900 as the Briardale for G. H. Elder & Co. of Newcastle and purchased by James Knott, who renamed her Corsican Prince, for Prince Line in 1907 when Elder’s went out of business. On 7th February 1917 she was torpedoed by UB-34 three miles off Whitby during a voyage from Dundee to Dunkirk.

OCEAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1907 by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson at Newcastle with a tonnage of 5101grt, a length of 401ft, a beam of 50ft 2in and a service speed of 10.5 knots. Completed in May 1907 she was taken over as an ammunition carrier in 1914 and given Pennant No. 193. On 15th December 1916 she was wrecked in fog near Quenada Light, Cap la Hoque whilst approaching Cherbourg. Attempts by tug to move her failed but the crew were safely evacuated.

NORSE PRINCE was built in 1907 by Palmer’s Co. at Jarrow with a tonnage of 5611grt, a length of 420ft 1in, a beam of 54ft 4in and a service speed of 12 knots. Prince Line’s first quadruple expansion steamship she entered service in November 1907 on the New York to South and East Africa service. On 3rd January 1910 she caught fire and was abandoned off Ascension Island during a voyage from New York to Cape Town.

ROYAL PRINCE (2) was built in 1907 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 5547grt, a length of 417ft 10in, a beam of 54ft 6in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Norse Prince she was delivered in December 1907. In 1924 she was sold to Soc. Anon. de Nav. ‘La Serenissima’ of Genoa who renamed her Sic Vos non Nobis. (Literal translation of the Latin is ‘Thus for you not us’ meaning ‘Service First’) By 1927 her owners realised that the name was cumbersome and changed it to Battinin Accame. In 1931 she was sold to Industrie Navali S. A. (I.N.S.A) of Genoa who renamed her Fortunato and in June of the following year she was broken up in Italy. (Photo: E Johnson)

SCOTTISH PRINCE (2) was built in 1910 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2897grt, a length of 340ft 7in, a beam of 46ft 5in and a service speed of 10 knots. First of a class of four ships she entered service in March 1910. On 7th September 1917 she was damaged when hit by a torpedo in the English Channel. In 1920 she served with Furness, Withy and was given a black hull with a white band and Furness’s funnel livery. She was sold to the Hellenic Lines Ltd, with P. G. Callimanopoulos as manager, in 1937 and renamed Athenai. In July 1940 she was seized by the Italians off Messina and renamed Palermo by unknown managers. On 9th September 1943 she was seized by the Germans off Valonia in Albania when Italy capitulated and was operated by Mittelmeer Reederi GmbH with the same name. In May 1944 she was badly damaged when she hit a mine off Tagliamento and taken into Fiume (Rijeka). Whilst there she was sunk by Allied bombers in the following July.

EASTERN PRINCE (2) as built in 1910 by J. Priestman & Co. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2881grt, a length of 340ft 7in, a beam of 46ft 5in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Scottish Prince she was delivered in March 1910. On 30th August 1917 she was torpedoed by U-62 thirty miles off the Eddystone lighthouse.

ASIATIC PRINCE (2) as built in 1910 by J. Priestman & Co. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2877grt, a length of 340ft 7in, a beam of 46ft 5in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Scottish Prince she was completed for Prince Line in June 1910. On 30th May 1918 she became Prince Line’s last WW1 casualty when she was torpedoed by U-63 190 miles east of Malta during a voyage from Bone to Salonika.

INDIAN PRINCE (2) as built in 1910 by J. Readhead & Sons at South Shields with a tonnage of 2845grt, a length of 340ft 7in, a beam of 46ft 5in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Scottish Prince she entered service in July 1910. On 4th September 1914 she was captured by the German auxiliary cruiser Kronprinz Wilhelm 210 miles north east of Pernambuco and sunk by bombs on 9th September. She was the former Nordddeutscher Lloyd ship’s first capture.

BURMESE PRINCE was built in 1911 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4825grt, a length of 396ft, a beam of 54ft 4in and a service speed of 11 knots. The first of four similar ships she was delivered in April 1911. In 1927 she was sold to the Miguel Larrinaga Steamship Co. of Liverpool and renamed Lucille de Larrinaga for operation by the Larrinaga Steamship Co. After a further seven years service she was broken up at Blyth by Hughes, Bolckow in June 1934.

SIAMESE PRINCE (1) was built in 1911 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4834grt, a length of 396ft, a beam of 54ft 4in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Burmese Prince she entered service in September 1911. On 16th August 1914 she was stopped by the German light cruiser Dresden but allowed to continue on her voyage when it was determined that she was not carrying a cargo that could be used in the war. She was attacked by a U-boat on 4th November 1916 when 210 miles west of the Scilly Isles but she managed to outpace her surfaced attacker. On 6th July 1917 she was again attacked by a surfaced U-boat but accurate gunfire from her stern gun caused the submarine to submerge. Two months later, on 4th September, she was missed by a torpedo in the Bay of Biscay. In March 1925 she was sold to Christian Salvesen’s South Georgia Co. for conversion into s whale processing ship and renamed Saragossa. On 16th March 1932 she had to be scuttled off the South Shetland Islands when a fire broke out in her whale oil. The crew were rescued by the accompanying whale catchers. (Photo: World Ship Society)

JAPANESE PRINCE (1) was built in 1911 by Wm. Doxford & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4876grt, a length of 396ft, a beam of 54ft 4in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Burmese Prince she entered service in September 1911. On 3rd November 1915 she was chased by and outpaced a U-boat in the Mediterranean. On 10th February 1917, during a voyage from Newport News to Southampton, she was torpedoed by UC-47 when she was 24 miles southwest of Bishops Rock.

CHINESE PRINCE (2) was built in 1911 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4834grt, a length of 396ft, a beam of 54ft 4in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Burmese Prince she entered service in July 1911. In 1925 she was sold to Soc. Anon. Navigazione Alta Italia of Genoa, renamed Monviso and broken up in Italy during 1933. (Photo: E Johnson)

ORANGE PRINCE was built in 1894 by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 3578grt, a length of 350ft, a beam of 43ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Completed as the Strathmore for Burrell & Son of Glasgow in June 1894 she was sold to McLaren & MacLaren of Glasgow in 1900 who retained her name. When MacLaren & MacLaren went out of business in 1903 she was acquired by W. R. Corfield & Co. of Cardiff and renamed Wye. She was purchased by Prince Line Ltd and renamed Orange Prince in 1912. On 15th November 1915 she was torpedoed by U-39 85 miles from Gavdo Island in the Mediterranean with the loss of three lives.

AUSTRIAN PRINCE/SERVIAN PRINCE was built in 1901 by J. L. Thompson & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4831grt, a length of 390ft, a beam of 51ft and a service speed of 11 knots. She was one of three ships built built for Timothy Hogan’s Menantic Steam Ship Co. of New York to carry bulk grain of livestock on the main deck and entered service as the Monomoy, registered under the North Atlantic Steam Ship Co. of Bristol. Acquired by Prince Line in February 1912 she was renamed Austrian Prince but in 1914 this was changed to Servian Prince as Austria were the enemy and Serbia one of the Allies. In 1923 she was sold to C. Devoto fu GB of Genoa who renamed her Sorriso and in 1926 she was broken up at Genoa. (Photo: E Johnson)

HUNGARIAN PRINCE/BELGIAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1901 by Sir James Laing & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4765grt, a length of 391ft 6in, a beam of 51ft and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Austrian Prince she was built as the Mohawk for Hogan’s Menantic Steamship Company of New York but registered under the North Atlantic Steam Ship Co. of Bristol. She was acquired by Prince Line in February 1912 when her name was changed to Hungarian Prince. On the outbreak of the First World War her name was changed to Belgian Prince as Hungary became an enemy nation. On 24th February 1915 she was chased by a U-boat in the English Channel but managed to outpace her. However, on 31st July 1917, during a voyage from Liverpool to Newport News, she was torpedoed by U-55 when she was 175 miles northwest of Tory island. The master was taken prisoner and 19 crew members were lined up on the submarine’s casing. With the unfounded belief that a British warship was in the vicinity the U-boat commander then submerged washing the crew members off the casing. In all 39 crew members lost their lives.

BULGARIAN PRINCE/FRENCH PRINCE was built in 1901 by Sir James Laing & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4766grt, a length of 390ft, a beam of 51ft and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Austrian Prince she was built as the Mineola for Hogan’s Menantic Steamship Company of New York but registered under the North Atlantic Steam Ship Co. of Bristol. She was the last of the three sisters acquired by Prince Line in 1912 when her name was changed to Bulgarian Prince and entered service in 1913. Her named was altered to French Prince in late 1914 when Bulgaria entered the was against the Allies. On 15th February 1917, during a voyage from La Plata to France, she was captured and sunk by the German auxiliary cruiser Mowe when 490 miles off the coast of Cape Frio in Brazil. The Mowe was on her second operation and on the previous day had been forced to sink the German supply ship Geier (formerly Rankin Gilmour’s Theodore which had been captured on 12th December 1916) as her machinery had broken down.

HIGHLAND PRINCE (3) was built in 1901 by J. L. Thompson & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 3390grt, a length of 335ft 10ins, a beam of 48ft and a service speed of 10 knots. Completed as the Matteawan for Timothy Hogan & Sons of New York and registered to the North Atlantic Steamship Co. of Bristol she was acquired by Prince Line Ltd and renamed Highland Prince in 1912. On 11th April 1917 she was torpedoed by UB-50 during a voyage from Alexandria to London when she was 36 miles off Cape Bon with the loss of 3 lives.

PORTUGUESE PRINCE (2) was built in 1912 by J. Priestman & Co. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4981grt, a length of 410ft, a beam of 53ft 4ins and a service speed of 11 knots. She was delivered to Prince Line Ltd in April 1912 and in December 1914 carried 1,200 horses to La Pallice in France from Galveston. The holds were partially loaded with coal which was decked over and on which stalls were erected. On of the holds was loaded with hay and her tanks filled with water. Fifty drovers were carried to care for the horses and the venture was so successful that she continued to carry horses for the duration of the war. She continued to operate until May 1934 when she was broken up by W. Arnott, Young & Co. at Troon. (Photo: E Johnson)

RUSSIAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1912 by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 4158grt, a length of 357ft 2ins, a beam of 48ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was one of two oil tankers built for Prince Line Ltd. and was given a black hull, entering service in September 1912. On 8th June 1917 she was hit by a torpedo when she was off southeast Ireland but managed to reach Queenstown safely. She was sold to British Tankers on 6th March 1918 and renamed British Marshal. In November 1929 she was sold to Soc. Italiana Transporti Petroloferi of Genoa who renamed her Tritone. On 7th March 1933 she was condemned and broken up in Italy after grounding on the Island of Tenedos. (Photo: World Ship Society)

ROUMANIAN PRINCE was built in 1913 by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 4147grt, a length of 357ft 2ins, a beam of 48ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Russian Prince she entered service in February 1913 and remained with the company until she was sold to British Tankers in 1918 and renamed British Major. On 19th November 1929 she was sold to Cia. Generale Armamento S. A. of Genoa who renamed her Riva Sicula. She was scrapped where she lay after grounding on 20th April 1933 during a voyage from Constanta to Genoa.

STUART PRINCE (2) was built in 1899 by Turnbull & Sons at Whitby with a tonnage of 3597grt, a length of 351ft 4ins, a beam of 43ft and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was built as the Hutton for Pyman Bros’ London & Northern Steam Ship Co. of London and acquired by Prince Line Ltd. who renamed her Stuart Prince in September 1912. On 22nd March 1917 she was torpedoed by U-66 85 miles off the Pembroke coast in the St. George’s Channel during a voyage from Manchester to Alexandria. (Photo: As Pyman Bros ‘Hutton’)

TUSCAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1913 by William Doxford & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 5275grt, a length of 420ft, a beam of 54ft 1in and a service speed of 12 knots. Built for Prince Line Ltd she entered service in December 1913. On 5th August 1918 she was torpedoed and holed when in the English Channel but managed to reach port. Four and a half years later, on 14th February 1923, while proceeding to Vancouver in a blinding snow storm, she was wrecked on Village Island in Barkley Sound, British Columbia. The Pacific Salvage Co. managed to recover most of her cargo but as the upperworks were being removed she slipped into deep water.(Photo: E Johnson)

ROMAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1914 by William Doxford & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 5284grt, a length of 420ft, a beam of 54ft 1in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Tuscan Prince she entered service in March 1914. In January 1927 she was sold to Thomas Law & Co’s Law Shipping Co. of Glasgow and renamed Berwick Law. Six years later she became the Benlomond when she was acquired by Wm. Thomson & Co’s Ben Line. In August 1935 she was sold to Kassos Steam Navigation Co. of Piraeus and renamed Chrysopolis. On 18th June 1936, during a voyage from Emden to Cape Town, she was wrecked off Cape Barbas in Senegal.

MOORISH PRINCE was built in 1914 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 5943grt, a length of 425ft 6in, a beam of 56ft 5in and a service speed of 11 knots. One of a pair of ships she entered service in May 1914. In 1927 she was sold to Miguel de Larrinaga Steam Ship Co. of Liverpool and renamed Anselma de Larrinaga. Four years later the Larrinaga Steam Ship Co. was formed to take over the ownership of the Larinnaga fleet and in May 1934 the Moorish Prince/Anselma de Larrinaga was broken up on the Clyde.

BRITISH PRINCE (2) was built in 1914 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 5936grt, a length of 425ft, a beam of 56ft 5in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Moorish Prince she was delivered in August 1914. On 1st November 1915 during a voyage from Cape Town to Luderitz Bay she grounded on Possession Island, broke her back and was declared a total loss. (Photo: Short Bros)

POLAR PRINCE was built in 1895 by Wigham, Richardson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 3547grt, a length of 340ft, a beam of 44ft and a service speed of 10 knots. She was built as the Goldenfels for Deutsche Dampschiff Ges. ‘Hansa’ of Bremen and in 1911 became the Ingeborg owned by Spielmann & Co. before being resold to the Hamburg Amerika Line who renamed her Persia. According to HAPAG she then reverted to Spielmann & Co. In 1912 she was sold to Deutsche Levante Linie of Hamburg who renamed her Oberon and then was renamed Kawak by Bremer Dampfer ‘Atlas’ under the management of Deutsche Levante Linie. On 8th August 1914 she was captured in the Mediterranean by HMS Chatham and taken into Bizerta. She arrived at Malta on 21st September, was condemned as a prize and renamed Polar Prince for management by J. Knott & Sons, a separate company located with Prince Line Ltd in Milburn House. In 1917 she was transferred to the Admiralty under the management of Farrar, Groves & Co of Liverpool and on 18th September 1917 was torpedoed by UB-50 when 8 miles southwest of Cape Spartel in Tangiers.

POLISH PRINCE was built in 1894 by Sir Raylton Dixon & Co. at Middlesbrough with a tonnage of 2969grt, a length of 315ft, a beam of 41ft 11in and a service speed of 10 knots. She completed as the Lindenfels for Deutsche Dampschiff Ges. ‘Hansa’ of Bremen and was renamed Ghazipur by her owners in 1903. In 1906 she was sold to Dampschiff Ge. ‘Argo’ of Bremen who renamed her Arcturus. Six years later she was sold to Deutsche Levante Linie who renamed her Kalymnos. On 6th August 1914 she was captured by HMS Savage, taken into Bizerta and on 29th November in Malta was condemned as a prize and renamed Polish Prince for management by James Knott & Sons Ltd. On 17th July 1915 she sank after being in collision with Furness Withy’s Lowther Range 230 miles west of Ireland whilst in a convoy sailing between Havana and the UK.

MONGOLIAN PRINCE was built in 1913 by Russell & Co. at Port Glasgow with a tonnage of 5880grt, a length of 423ft 6in, a beam of 56ft and a service speed of 10.5 knots. She was built as the Verdala for the Verdala Steam Ship Co. with Gow, Harrison & Co. as managers and in 1917 was acquired by Prince Line Ltd who renamed her Mongolian Prince. She was sold to Jugoslavenska Lloyd of Dubrovik in 1929 and renamed Istok. When Jugoslavia fell in 1940 she was taken over by the Jugoslav controlled Crest Shipping who renamed her Maycrest. On 29th July 1944 she was towed from Cardiff to the Normandy beachhead (Gooseberry 2 – Omaha Beach, Mulberry A) and on 1st August was scuttled as a blockship in the artificial harbour. She replaced ships which had been displaced by the June/July gales and her accommodation, which was above the waterline, housed anti-aircraft gunner.

SIBERIAN PRINCE was built in 1915 by Russell & Co. at Port Glasgow with a tonnage of 5604grt, a length of 423ft 6in, a beam of 56ft and a service speed of 10.5 knots. Sister of the Mongolian Prince she was built as the Baron Lovat for Hugh Hogarth & Co. of Ardrossan and acquired by the Peareth Shipping Co. of Newcastle in July 1917 who renamed her Siberian Prince. In 1924 she was transferred to Prince Line Ltd who retained her name. In December 1933 she was sold to L. A. Embericos of London, renamed Dunavi and in 1939 her name was changed to Arlsiana when she was acquired by Industrie Navali Soc. Anon (INSA) of Genoa. When Tunis fell to the Allies in April 1943 she was found there sunk and abandoned. On 29th May 1946 the hulk was purchased by Societe Tunisienne de Sauvetage and refloated on 30th October. In 1948, on 21st October, she left Tunis and was towed to the Tyne where she was broken up by Clayton & Davie Ltd.

HUNTSLAND was built in 1911 by Bremer Vulkan at Port Vegesak with a tonnage of 2871grt, a length of 338ft 8in, a beam of 48ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was built as the Eurymanthos for the Deutsche Levante Linie of Hamburg. On 6th August 1914 she was captured by HMS Hussar and taken into Valetta where she was condemned as a prize and renamed Huntsland. Requisitioned by the Admiralty she was placed under the management of J. Knott & Sons but in 1917 she was considered to be a mis-match with other Prince Line ships and was transferred to Wm. Robertson of Glasgow. On 6th June 1918, during a voyage from Le Havre to Portsmouth, she was torpedoed by UC-77 23 miles from Le Havre in the English Channel.

GAELIC PRINCE (1) was built in 1917 by Short Bros. at Port Sunderland with a tonnage of 6506grt, a length of 449ft 6in, a beam of 57ft 4in and a service speed of 12 knots. The first of four sister ships she was completed in April 1918 and remained with the company until 1929 when she was sold to Deutsche Dampschiff Ges. ‘Hansa’ of Bremen and renamed Rheinfels. In 1939 she was sold to the Hamburg Sud Amerika Linie who changed her name to Bahia Castillo. On 29th August she sailed from Santa Cruz on a blockade breaking voyage to Murmansk where she arrived on 16th October. Shortly after she moved to Hamburg where she became a naval troop transport. On 21st May 1940 she was returned to the Hamburg Sud Amerika Linie and on the 1st August was torpedoed by the British submarine HMS Narwhal of the Skaw. Towed into Kiel she was broken up for her steel. (Photo: E Johnson)

Prince Line

CELTIC PRINCE (1) was built in 1917 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 8558grt, a length of 449ft 6in, a beam of 57ft 4in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Gaelic Prince she was completed in June 1918. After eight years service she was sold to Deutsche Dampshiff Ges. ‘Hansa’ of Bremen in 1926 and renamed Schonfels. In May 1938 she was acquired by Hamburg Sud Amerika Linie who changed her name to Bahia Blanca. On 9th December 1939 she sailed from Buenos Aires for Germany and on 10th January 1940, when she was in the Denmark Strait, she hit an iceberg and sank on the following day.

GOTHIC PRINCE (1) was built in 1917 by Palmers Co. at Jarrow with a tonnage of 8552grt, a length of 451ft 8in, a beam of 57ft 4in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Gaelic Prince she remained with the company until 15th March 1927 when she was sold to Deutsche Dampshiff Ges. ‘Hansa’ of Bremen who renamed her Sonnenfels. In September 1938 she was acquired by the Hamburg Sud Amerika Linie and renamed Bahia Camerones. She was briefly requisitioned by the German Navy in October 1939 as the Sperrbrecker 1 before being returned to her owners on 30th July 1940. On 5th June 1941 she began conversion into a troopship and was commissioned on the 9th July. On 12th January 1945 she was in a convoy that was attacked by the British cruisers HMS Norfolk and HMS Bellona and the destroyers HMS Onslow, HMS Onslaught and HMS Orwell south of Eggersund in Norway. The Bahia Camerones was wrecked and beached.

SLAVIC PRINCE (1) was built in 1917 by Palmers Co. at Jarrow with a tonnage of 8561grt, a length of 451ft 8in, a beam of 57ft 4in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Gaelic Prince she was completed in October 1918 and remained with the company until 1926 when she was sold to Deutsche Dampschiff Ges. ‘Hansa’ of Bremen and renamed Rabenfels. In May 1938 she was sold to Hamburg Sud Amerika Linie who renamed her Bahia Laura. On 14th October 1939 she undertook a blockade breaking run from Buenos Aires to Hamburg where she arrived on 5th December disguised as the Soviet ship Minsk. She was requisitioned as a troop transport for Operation Sealion, the invasion of Southern England, on 22nd August 1940 but stood down on the following 4th December. On 25th April 1941 she began trooping to Norway and on 30th August, when bound for Solven in the Lofoten Islands, she was torpedoed by the British submarine HMS Trident with the loss of 450 lives.(Photo: Hildebrand)

PERSIAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1918 by Wm. Pickersgill & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 5685grt, a length of 405ft, a beam of 52ft 4in and a service speed of 11 knots. Completed in July 1918 she began service for the Shipping Controller with Prince Line Ltd as managers. In 1933 she was sold to D. D. Stathatos of Ithaca and renamed Ann Stathatos By 1946 she was owned by A. D. Stathatos and in 1951 she was sold to Pala & Franceschesini of Genoa who renamed her Cadore. She was broken up at Yokohama in April 1959.

ARABIAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1919 by Wm. Pickersgill & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 5764grt, a length of 405ft, a beam of 52ft 4in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Persian Prince she was delivered in January 1919. She was sold to Turner, Brightman & Co. of London for operation as the Zenada by the ‘Z’ Steam Ship Co. in 1927. In 1933 she was acquired by Theofanos Maritime of Chios, with N. G. Livanos as managers, and renamed Nestos. On 2nd April 1941, during a voyage from New Orleans to Garston, she was wrecked in fog on the Hoyle Bank at the entrance of the River Mersey after being half a mile off course. (Photo: World Ship Society)

MANCHURIAN PRINCE was built in 1913 by Robert Duncan & Co. at Port Glasgow with a tonnage of 5119grt, a length of 405ft, a beam of 53ft and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed as the Ardgair in May 1913 for Lang & Fulton’s Ardgair Steamship Co. of Glasgow and acquired by Prince Line in 1918 and renamed Manchurian Prince. In 1933 she was sold to the Continental Indies Shipping Co. of Bridgetown, Barbados and renamed Naana for management by William A. Shaw of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Two years later she was acquired by Atlantska Plovidba of Susak who changed her name to Senga. In 1946 her owners were restyled Jugoslavenska and the ship’s name was changed to Korcula. In April of the same year she was broken up at Hong Kong.

GRECIAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1918 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 5263grt, a length of 400ft, a beam of 52ft 5in and a service speed of 10.5 knots. One of five vessels she was launched on 28th August 1918 as the War Hind for the Shipping Controller and when completed on 10th October was placed under the management of the Ropner Shipping Co. Taken over by Prince Line and renamed Grecian Prince in 1919 she was transferred to Warren Line in 1924 when her name was changed to Savannah. In 1927 she was sold to Ivo Racic’s Atlanska Plovidba of Dubrovnik and became the Nevesinje. When the Jugoslavenska Lloyd was formed in 1928 she was one of the original 28 ships which made up the fleet. On 8th September 1928 she grounded at Parda Point in the Straits of Magellan during a voyage from Buenos Aires to Coronel. Pulled free and beached on 5th November by Braun & Blanchard of Valparaiso she was repaired during 1929 by Braun & Blanchard and renamed Coquimbo for operation by their S. A. Commercial. In 1932 she was sold to Cia de Nav. Interoceanica of Valparaiso who renamed her Valparaiso. Three years later she was acquired by A. Barbarevic of Rijeka who renamed her Prince Pavel and in 1942 was taken over by Petrinovic & Co. as the Franka. In 1946, when the fleets were nationalised, she was renamed Kordun by Dubrovacka Plovidba of Dubrovnik and in 1955 her owners became Jugoslavenska Oceanska Plovidba. On 30th October 1959 she arrived in Hong Kong where she was broken up.

KOREAN PRINCE was built in 1918 by Bartram & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4980grt, a length of 400ft, a beam of 52ft 5in and a service speed of 10.5 knots. Sister of the Grecian Prince she was built as the Hindustan for Common Bros. of Newcastle and acquired by Prince Line in 1918 and renamed Korean Prince. She was sold to D. J. Pateras & Sons of Chios in 1934 and renamed Diamantis. On 3rd October 1939 she was torpedoed by U-35 off Land’s Ends.

SPARTAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1919 by Earl’s Co. at Hull with a tonnage of 5247grt, a length of 400ft 5in, a beam of 52ft 2in and a service speed of 10.5 knots. Sister of the Grecian Prince she was completed on 11th January 1919 as the War Shark for the Shipping Controller and taken over by Furness Withy and renamed Spartan Prince for Prince Line Ltd. In 1923 she was transferred to Warren Line (Liverpool) Ltd and renamed Bay State. She was sold to D. D. Strathatos of Piraeus in 1928 and renamed Eleni Strathatos. On 28th October 1929 she was wrecked on Fernando Noronha during a voyage from Swansea to Ibicuy.

TROJAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1918 by Bartram & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 5226grt, a length of 400ft, a beam of 52ft 5in and a service speed of 10.5 knots. The first of ten standard ships built by Bartram’s she was launched on 27th May 1918 as the War Perch for the Shipping Controller. Sister of the Grecian Prince she completed her trials on 6th June and was delivered to Prince Line as the Trojan Prince. In 1923 she was transferred to Warren Line (Liverpool) Ltd and renamed Hoosac. She was sold to Petrinovic & Co’s Jugoslavenska Lloyd AD of Dubrovnik and renamed Nemanja in 1930. On 8th April 1942 she was torpedoed by U-84 when 195 west of Cape Sable.

TARTAR PRINCE (2) was built in 1918 by Wm. Gray & Co. at West Hartlepool with a tonnage of 5214grt, a length of 400ft, a beam of 52ft 5in and a service speed of 10.5 knots. Sister of the Grecian Prince she was completed in May 1918 as the War Jackdaw for the Shipping Controller with Furness,Withy & Co. as managers. In 1919 she was acquired by the Furness, Withy subsidiary Peareth Steamship Co. of Newcastle and renamed Tartar Prince. Five years later she was transferred to Prince Line Ltd, retaining her name. She was sold to Societe Misr de Nav. Maritime of Alexandria in 1933 and renamed Fostat. In 1939 she was renamed Star of Luxor when she was acquired by the Alexandria Steam Navigation Co. of Alexandria, the Red Rose Line, with Watts Watts & Co. as managers. On 10th December 1941 she was torpedoed by U-130 off Rockall. (Photo: FW Hawks)

ALGERIAN PRINCE was built in 1919 by J. Priestman & Co. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 3089grt, a length of 331ft 4in, a beam of 46ft 10in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was laid down as the War Isthmus for the Shipping Controller. Launched on 14th August 1919 she was delivered to Prince Line Ltd in the following October as the Algerian Prince. In 1936 she was sold for £17,500 to Societe Algerienne de Navigation pour L’Afrique du Nord of Algiers, owned by Charles Schiaffino & Cie, and renamed Louis Charles Schiaffino. She came under Vichy control in July 1940 and on 26th February 1941 she was mistakenly sunk by a German aircraft off the Algerian coast.

CYPRIAN PRINCE (2)/MOORISH PRINCE (3) was built in 1919 by J. Blumer & Co. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 3071grt, a length of 331ft 4in, a beam of 46ft 10in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Algerian Prince she was laid down as the War Planet for the Shipping Controller, launched on 29th July and completed in the September as the Cyprian Prince. In August 1936 she was renamed Moorish Prince to release the name for a new building and then sold to Chas. Hill & Sons’ Bristol City Line who renamed her Gloucester City. She became the Namaqualand when she was acquired by the South African Lines of Cape Town in 1949 and, two years later, the Kaderbaksh when sold to the United Oriental Steam Ship Co. of Karachi. In December 1961 she arrived at Gadani Beach, Karachi where she was broken up. (Photo: R Sherlock)

SYRIAN PRINCE (2)/WELSH PRINCE (4) was built in 1919 by J. L. Thompson & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 3072grt, a length of 331ft 4in, a beam of 46ft 10in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Algerian Prince she was laid down as the War Rock for the Shipping Controller and completed on 11th November 1919 as the Syrian Prince for Prince Line Ltd. In 1936 she was renamed Welsh Prince to release the name for a new building and then sold to Pasqual Mazella of Naples who changed her name to Deo Mazella. On 8th September 1943 she was seized by the Germans at Venice and used to transport supplies to troops in Jugoslavia and on 30th September was sunk by Partizan forces near Sebenico. (Photo: John Clarkson Collection)

EGYPTIAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1903 by W. Dobson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 507grt, a length of 164ft, a beam of 25ft and a service speed of 9 knots. She was built as the Waterland for Furness, Withy’s Shipping & Coal Co. of London but transferred to their Sheepvaart en Steenkolen Maas of Rotterdam. In 1921 she was renamed Egyptian Prince for Prince Line Ltd and in the following year was sold to Khedivial Mail Steam Ship & Graving Dock Co. of London who changed her name to Ramleh for management by Lord Earnest Hamilton. She was sold on to Ahmed Ibrahim El Kouedi of Alexandra in 1931 who renamed her Lateef. By 1933 she was owned by Ovadia Israil Ovadia of Alexandria with the same name and in 1946 reverted to Ramleh when she was acquired by Trans Mediterranean Nav. Co. of Alexandria with A. Tanielan as manager. She became the Shadwan in 1947 when under the ownership of N. Kyriacou of Alexandria before reverting to Trans Mediterranean and being removed from the register in 1980.

EGYPTIAN PRINCE (4) was built in 1921 by Furness Shipbuilding Co. at Haverton Hill with a tonnage of 4898grt, a length of 363ft 5in, a beam of 52ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. She was launched as the Egyptian Prince but delivered to Wilhelm Wilmhelmsen’s A/S Norge Mexoco Gulf Linien of Tonsberg as the Louisiana to replace a ship requisitioned by the Shipping Controller. On 7th March 1927 she was sold to Ozean-Dampfer A. G. of Flensburg and renamed Nord-Friesland. In 1930 she was transferred to Norddeutscher Lloyd of Bremen and renamed Munster. She was chartered to Hamburg-Sud Amerika Linen of Hamburg in 1935 and taken over by them in 1938 when she was renamed Corrientes. When World War 2 broke out in September 1939 she was interned at Las Palmas and taken over by the Spanish Government in September 1942 and renamed Monte Moncayo. In 1944 she was transferred to Naviera Aznar of Bilboa without a change of name. She was renamed Tajuna when she was acquired by Maritima Madrilena S. A. of Bilboa in January 1957. On 10th December 1957 she went aground at Mazarron during a storm and was broken up at Cartagena in the following year.

LANCASTRIAN PRINCE (2)/ITALIAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1921 by Furness Shipbuilding Co. at Haverton Hill with a tonnage of 3478grt, a length of 363ft 5in, a beam of 52ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Egyptian Prince she entered service in May 1921 as the Lancastrian Prince but was renamed Italian Prince in 1922. On 7th September 1938 all 43 crew were saved by other ships when she caught fire and was abandoned off Cape Finesterre. (Photo: A Duncan)

EGYPTIAN PRINCE (5) was built in 1922 by Furness Shipbuilding Co. at Haverton Hill with a tonnage of 3490grt, a length of 363ft 5in, a beam of 52ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. She was launched as Braziliana for Furness Withy but delivered in May 1922 as the Egyptian Prince to replace the Egyptian Prince (4) which never saw service with Prince Line. In 1946, after surviving the war, she was sold to Cie des Bateaux du Nord of Dunkirk and renamed Lorrain. Seven years later, in 1953, she was acquired by Soc. Monegasque de Transports Maritimes of Monte Carlo and renamed Herculis. She was broken up in Toulon during February 1960. (Photo: B Fielden)

LANCASTRIAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1921 by Furness Shipbuilding Co. at Haverton Hill with a tonnage of 3482grt, a length of 363ft 5in, a beam of 52ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Egyptian Prince she was completed in June 1921 as the Tunisiana for Furness, Withy & Co. and transferred to Prince Line Ltd as the Lancastrian Prince in 1922. In 1938 she was sold to Cie des Bateaux du Nord of Dunkirk who renamed her Champenois and on 19th April 1941 became a total loss when she ran aground near Casablanca.

CASTILIAN PRINCE (4) was built in 1923 by Furness Shipbuilding Co. at Haverton Hill with a tonnage of 3908grt, a length of 364ft, a beam of 52ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was completed as the Sycamore for the Johnston Line Ltd in November 1923 and transferred to Prince Line Ltd as the Castilian Prince in 1926. She was sold to Sovtorgflot of Odessa in 1932 and renamed Enukidze. Thereafter she was renamed G. Yagoda in 1935, Michurin in 1937and Voroshilov in 1946 before reverting to Michurin in the same year. She was withdrawn from service in 1965 and subsequently deleted from Lloyds Register.

BRAZILIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1924 by Furness Shipbuilding Co. at Haverton Hill with a tonnage of 3907grt, a length of 364ft, a beam of 52ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Castilian Prince she was completed as the Tramore for the Johnston Line Ltd. in August 1924 before being transferred to Prince Line Ltd as the Brazilian Prince. In 1933 she was sold to Sovtorgflot of Odessa, together with her sister, and renamed Voroshilov. On 14th February 1943 she was damaged by a mine off Tuapse. In 1950 she was re-engined with two M. A. N. diesels which had been built at Augsburg in 1944 but never used. She was renamed Ilichevsk, also spelt Ilyichovsk, in 1962 and was last recorded in Lloyds Register in 1975.(Photo: World Ship Society)

EASTERN PRINCE (3) was built in 1915 by J.C. Tecklenborg A. G. at Geestemunde with a tonnage of 7596grt, a length of 468ft 6in, a beam of 58ft 6in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was launched as the Altenfels for Deutsch Dampschiff Ges. ‘Hansa’ of Bremen but when completed in 1917 was immediately laid up. In 1920 she ceded to the British Shipping Controller and was placed under the management of Henderson Bros. She was acquired by Prince Line Ltd in 1921 and renamed Eastern Prince. After five years she was bought back by ‘Hansa’ who changed her name to Stolzenfels. In September 1939 she was requisitioned by the German Navy, renamed Sperrbrecker XII and on 5th May 1941 sank after hitting a mine off Schiermonnikoog in the Frisian Islands.

IMPERIAL PRINCE (2) was built in 1922 by Furness Shipbuilding Co. at Haverton-on-Tees with a tonnage of 7896grt, a length of 450ft 6in, a beam of 58ft and a service speed of 14.5 knots. One of three ships built for Furness, Withy & Co she was completed as the Feliciana in May 1922. Ahead of their time and creating much interest in maritime circles they were built for the London – New York route but diminishing demand and US subsidies made the service unprofitable. In 1922 she was transferred to Gulf Line Ltd as the London Mariner and in 1928 to Prince Line Ltd. who renamed her Imperial Prince. When the shipping industry slumped in 1930 she was laid up in the River Blackwater off Tollesbury where she remained for 4 years. In May 1935 she was sold to Thos. & Jas. Harrison of Liverpool for a joint service to South Africa with Clan Line and Ellerman’s and renamed Craftsman. On 9th April 1941 she was captured by the German auxiliary cruiser Kormoran and sunk 300 miles east of St. Pauls Rocks in the South Atlantic with loss of 5 lives by gunfire and 41 crewmembers were taken prisoner. She was one of 11 ships taken by Raider G, Schiff 42, ex HAPAG’s Steiermark. (Photo: RJ Scott)

ROYAL PRINCE (3) was built in 1923 by Furness Shipbuilding Co. at Haverton-on-Tees with a tonnage of 7886grt, a length of 450ft 6in, a beam of 58ft and a service speed of 14.5 knots. Sister of the Imperial Prince she was completed as the London Commerce for Furness, Withy & Co. In 1928 she was overhauled at Cobh, transferred to Prince Line and renamed Royal Prince. She was laid up in the River Blackwater at Tollesbury in 1931 and remained there until May 1935 when she was sold with her sisters to T & J Harrison who renamed her Collegian. In September 1940 she was attacked by gunfire from U-32 when 320 miles west of Malin Head but managed to escape. After 12 years service with Harrison’s she was broken up by BISCO at Milford Haven in 1947.

BRITISH PRINCE (3) was built in 1923 by Furness Shipbuilding Co. at Haverton-on-Tees with a tonnage of 7939grt, a length of 450ft 6in, a beam of 58ft and a service speed of 14.5 knots. Sister of the Imperial Prince she was completed in August 1923 as the London Shipper for Furness, Withy & Co. but transferred to the Norfolk & North American Steamship Co. She was transferred to Prince Line as the British Prince in 1928 and in 1930 was laid up in the River Blackwater alongside her sisters. In May 1935 she was sold to T & J Harrison’s and renamed Statesman. On 17th May 1941 she was sunk by a aerial torpedo dropped by a Focke-Wulf Condor 200 miles west of Inishtrahull in Ireland with the loss on one life.

NORTHERN PRINCE was built in 1929 by Lithgows Ltd. at Port Glasgow with a tonnage of 10917grt, a length of 514ft, a beam of 64ft 11in and a service speed of 16.5 knots. Launched on 27th November 1928 she was the first of four sisters and commenced her maiden voyage from the UK to New York with calls at Buenos Aires and Rosario in the following April. On 15th May she began operating on the New York – River Plate service. In 1938 the company’s competitor on that route, the Munson Line, went into liquidation leaving Prince Line as the sole operator but the service was discontinued when the Second World War broke out. On 3rd April 1941 she was bombed and sunk by German aircraft in the Kithera Strait, off Crete whilst sailing in convoy to bring re-enforcements to the island during the Greek campaign.

EASTERN PRINCE (4) was built in 1929 by Napier & Miller Ltd. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 10926grt, a length of 514ft, a beam of 64ft 11in and a service speed of 16.5 knots. Sister of the Northern Prince she was launched on 29th January 1929 and delivered in the following June. In 1932 she rescued the crew of D. Falangas’s Artemis which had run aground off Bahia. During 1940 she made seven round trips between the UK and Canada with children and civilian personnel before being converted into a troopship at Liverpool on 20th-21st December. During conversion she was damaged by German bombers but was commissioned for 1200 men in the following June. In 1943 she was refitted at Baltimore when US standee bunks were installed and her capacity increased to 2150 men. She was used as an accommodation ship during the Yalta Conference in 1945 and on 30th March 1946 was acquired by the Ministry of Transport for use as a troopship. Renamed Empire Medway in 1950, with Prince Line as managers she was given a white hull with blue band and yellow funnel and deployed between Southampton – Gibraltar – Trieste or Cyprus – Port Said and Lebanon. In November 1952 she arrived at Faslane where she was broken up during 1953. (Photo: A Duncan)

SOUTHERN PRINCE (1) was built in 1929 by Lithgows Ltd. at Port Glasgow with a tonnage of 10917grt, a length of 514ft, a beam of 64ft 11in and a service speed of 16.5 knots. Sister of the Northern Prince she was launched on 12th March 1929, underwent trial during the following June and entered service in the August. In 1940 she was converted into a minesweeper and joined the 1st Minelaying Squadron together with Blue Funnel’s Agamemnon and Prometheus, and Port Line’s Port Napier and Port Quebec. Between them they laid a mine barrage across the Northern Approaches. During the Normandt D-Day landings she was the headquarters ship of Rear-Admiral Rivett-Carnet as part of Operation Neptune, the Naval part of the overall operation. She left the Solent in convoy EWP 1 on 7th June 1944 and anchored off Juno beach on the following day. The final days of the war saw her in the Pacific as a fleet training ship. In 1947 she was sold to G. Costa fu Andrea of Genoa who refitted and modernised her as the Anna C for their Genoa – South America service. Re-engined with a Fiat diesel in 1952 to increase her speed to 20.5 knots she was refitted again in 1960 in order to accommodate 202 1st Class and 864 Tourist Class passengers on the Central America service. After a further 12 years and a total of 42 years service she was broken up at La Spezia in 1972. (Photo: E Johnson)

WESTERN PRINCE (1) was built in 1929 by Napier & Miller Ltd. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 10926grt, a length of 514ft, a beam of 64ft 11in and a service speed of 16.5 knots. Sister of the Northern Prince she was launched on 20th June 1929 and delivered in the following October. On 12th December 1940 she sailed from New York bound for Liverpool and on 16th was torpedoed by U-96 400 miles west of the Orkney Islands with the loss of 16 lives. 154 persons were rescued. (Photo: A Duncan)

SIAMESE PRINCE (2) was built in 1929 by Blythswood Shipbuilding Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 6607grt, a length of 441ft 6in, a beam of 60ft 4in and a service speed of 14.5 knots. Completed in September 1929 she was one of seven ships, six of which were built for the Rio Cape Line. On 17th February 1941, during a voyage from Halifax to Liverpool, she was torpedoed by U-69 in the North Atlantic. (Photo: A Duncan)

RHODESIAN PRINCE was built in 1935 by Blythswood Shipbuilding Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4684grt, a length of 407ft, a beam of 55ft and a service speed of 10.5 knots. She was completed in August 1935 as the Argentine Transport for the Empire Transport Co. but transferred to Prince Line Ltd with the Renfrew Navigation Co. as managers and renamed Rhodesian Prince. In 1937 she was transferred to Furness Withy’s Houlder Line for their South American trade as the Owestry Grange, carrying general cargo outward and grain on the return. On 12th February 1941 whilst in convoy SLS 64 sailing from Rosario to Liverpool via Freetown she was caught and sunk by the German cruiser Admiral Hipper in the North Atlantic (37. 10N 21. 20W) with the loss of 5 lives. The Admiral Hipper had left Brest on 1st February and returned on 14th to refuel after sinking seven ships. (Photo: A Duncan)

ARABIAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1936 by William Hamilton & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1999grt, a length of 296ft 4in, a beam of 44ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was the first of four ships built to trade to the Mediterranean. After an uneventful career and surviving World War Two she was broken up by Hollands Scheeps Veersdijk, Hendrik ido Ambacht during April 1959.

PALESTINIAN PRINCE was built in 1936 by William Hamilton & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1965grt, a length of 296ft 4in, a beam of 44ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Arabian Prince she entered service in December 1936. In December 1959 she was sold to Cia Maritima Med. of Beirut and renamed Happy Med. Six years later she was renamed Mimi by the Emmameth Corp of Panama and in July 1970 she was broken up at Split. (Photo: RJ Scott)

SYRIAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1936 by William Hamilton & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1988grt, a length of 296ft 4in, a beam of 44ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Arabian Prince and built for the Mediterranean trade she was delivered in December 1936. After twenty three years service with Prince Line and surviving WW2 she was, on 9th May 1959, sold to P. Th. Petropoulos, Cia. Maritima Med. of Beirut and renamed Sunny Med. In 1964 she was acquired by Glyfada Seafaring Corp. S. A. of Piraeus and renamed Dinos. On 25th October 1969 she arrived at Savona where she was broken up.

CYPRIAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1936 by Furness Shipbuilding Co. at Haverton Hill with a tonnage of 1988grt, a length of 296ft 4in, a beam of 44ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Arabian Prince she entered the Mediterranean service in January 1937. In early 1940 she was being escorted by HMS Exmouth when, on 21st January, the latter was torpedoed and sunk by U-22 with heavy loss of life. On 6th April 1941 she was one of four ships sunk by parachute mines dropped by German aircraft at Piraeus during the Allied campaign in Greece.
An Archaeological Expedition has been set up to locate and identify the present site of HMS Exmouth. For more details about the sinking and for information about the expedition visit www.HMSExmouth.com

AFRICAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1939 by Furness Shipbuilding Co. at Haverton Hill with a tonnage of 4653grt, a length of 437ft 5in, a beam of 42ft 10in and a service speed of 12 knots. Completed in September 1939 she briefly served with Prince Line before being requisitioned for duties with the Ministry of War Transport. In 1961 she was sold to Mullion & Co. of Hong Kong who changed her name to Ardmore. Four years later she was sold for £200,000 to the Craft Shipping Co. of Gibraltar, a subsidiary of Mullion & Co., and renamed Kali Elpis. The Mullion fleet was transferred to Gibraltar when the Viet Nam conflict broke out. She was broken up by the Steel Corporation of India at Bombay in May 1969. (Photo: A Duncan)

NORMAN PRINCE (4) was built in 1940 by Smith’s Dockyard Co. at Middlesbrough with a tonnage of 1913grt, a length of 315ft, a beam of 44ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. One of four ships she was completed in April 1940 but had a short lived career which ended on 29th May 1942 when she was torpedoed by U-156 west of Martinique during a voyage from Barranquia to St. Lucia in ballast.

LANCASTRIAN PRINCE (4) was built in 1940 by Smith’s Dockyard Co. at Middlesbrough with a tonnage of 1914grt, a length of 315ft, a beam of 44ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Norman Prince she was delivered in May 1940. On 12th April 1943 she was torpedoed by U-404 off Newfoundland during a voyage from Manchester to Boston.

TUDOR PRINCE (3) was built in 1940 by Smith’s Dockyard Co. at Middlesbrough with a tonnage of 1914grt, a length of 315ft, a beam of 44ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Norman Prince she was completed in August 1940. On 22nd July 1946 she suffered an engine failure off the Skerries in the Irish Sea and had to be towed 70 miles back to Liverpool by Alexandra’s tugs Alfred and Wapping. She was sold to F. Italo Croce in 1957 and renamed Croce Italo. In 1961 she was acquired by Maritime Enterprise Co. of Beirut, renamed Ornello and was broken up at La Spezia in May 1964. (Photo: RJ Scott)

STUART PRINCE (4) was built in 1940 by Smith’s Dockyard Co. at Middlesbrough with a tonnage of 1948grt, a length of 315ft, a beam of 44ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Norman Prince she was completed for Prince Line, with Furness Withy & Co. as managers, in October 1940. In 1951 she was chartered to the Bermuda & West Indies Steamship Co. and renamed Fort Hamilton for operation with the Fort Avalon out of New York. When she came off charter in 1958 she reverted to Stuart Prince but was surplus to requirements and in the following year was sold, with the Fort Avalon, to Cia. Maritima Med Ltda of Beirut and renamed Halcyon Med. On 28th August 1960, during a voyage from Azrew to Granton she was run down by the Esso Switzerland 120 miles east of Gibraltar and sank in two parts.

WELSH PRINCE (5) was built in 1940 by Blythswood Shipbuilding Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 5148grt, a length of 432ft 6in, a beam of 56ft and a service speed of 12.5 knots. Sister of Rio Cape’s Scottish Prince she was launched on 23rd April 1940. On 7th December 1941 she struck a mine off Spurn Head and sank in shallow water near Cromer with her superstructure still showing. Subsequent inspection revealed that she had broken in two and was a total loss.

HIGHLAND PRINCE (5) was built in 1942 by Burntisland Shipbuilding Co. at Burntisland with a tonnage of 7043grt, a length of 441ft, a beam of 57ft and a service speed of 12 knots. Launched on 25th September 1942 she was handed over to Prince Line, with Furness & Co. as managers, in the following December. She was sold to Williamson & Co. of Hong Kong for £360,000 in April 1955 who renamed her Inchstuart. In December 1959 she was transferred to the Douglas Steam Ship Co. and placed under the management of Douglas Lapraik & Co. On 6th June 1969 she arrived at Hong Kong where she was broken up by Leung Yau & Co.

ENGLISH PRINCE (1) was built in 1943 by Wm. Doxford & Sons. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 7275grt, a length of 442ft 11ins, a beam of 56ft 6in and a service speed of 11 knots. Launched on 22nd December 1942 she was completed for Prince Line in the following April. In 1953 she was chartered to Shaw, Saville & Albion keeping her name and livery. Reverting to Prince Line in 1957 she remained with the company until 1961 when she was sold to Amanda Shipping Ltd of Monrovia and renamed Simos. In 1963 her owners transferred her port of registry to Piraeus and placed her under the management of S. Sikiardis. On 22nd July 1972 she ran aground in fog near Cape St. Vincent, Portugal. Refloated on 22nd August she was condemned and proceeded to unload her cargo at Setubal where she remained until 1973 when she was towed to Bilboa and broken up September of that year. (Photo: G Scott)

CHINESE PRINCE (4)/NORDIC was built in 1943 by J. L. Thompson & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 9485grt, a length of 490ft 4in, a beam of 63ft 6in and a service speed of 13 knots. Launched on 23rd March 1943 she was handed over to Prince Line in the following October. In 1950 she was transferred to Shaw, Saville & Albion on a bareboat charter and renamed Nordic. After 14 years she reverted back to Prince Line and was put up for sale in 1963. On 1st November 1964 she arrived at Hirao where she was broken up.

SCOTTISH PRINCE (4) was built in 1944 by Burntisland Shipbuilding Co. at Burntisland with a tonnage of 7138grt, a length of 443ft 1in, a beam of 57ft and a service speed of 12 knots. Similar to the Highland Prince she was completed in June 1944. She only remained with the company until 1952 when she was sold to Rio Bello Cia. Naviera S. A. of Panama who renamed her Vitali. In the same year she was transferred to Crest Shipping Co. of Nassau for £640,000, placed under the control of Ivanovic & Co. and renamed Hillcrest. She was sold to Fidelitas Shipping Co. of Monrovia in 1959 and had her name changed to Sophia. On 14th April 1966 she caught fire and was beached at Ambelaki, Salamis. Subsequently abandoned to the underwriters she was sold to the Janice Shipping Co. of Famagusta who repaired her and continued trading with her as the Yannis until November 1969 when she was broken up at Shanghai. (Photo: A Duncan)

BRAZILIAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1944 by United Shipyards Ltd at Montreal with a tonnage of 7158grt, a length of 441ft 6in, a beam of 57ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. On 28th September 1944 she was delivered as the Outremont Park to the Canadian Government’s Park Steam Ship Co. and bareboat chartered to the Ministry of War Transport with whom she remained until the following year when she reverted to her original owner. She was immediately put up for for sale but to Canadian flag owners only and was subsequently purchased by Furness (Canada ) Ltd who renamed her Brazilian Prince for management by Prince Line. In 1954 she was transferred to Furness (Montreal) Ltd and in 1958 became the Federal Pioneer of the Federal Terminal Lines Ltd of Montreal. After a further 13 years service she was broken up in China during 1971. (Photo: A Duncan)

ROYAL PRINCE (4) was built in 1944 by United Shipyards Ltd at Montreal with a tonnage of 7160grt, a length of 441ft 6in, a beam of 57ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Brazilian Prince she was launched as the Fort Simcoe and delivered to the Park Steam Ship Co. as the Elgin Park. Chartered to the Ministry of War Transport she reverted to her original owner at the end of the war and was immediately put up for sale to Canadian flag owners only. She was purchased by Furness (Canada) Ltd in 1946 and renamed Royal Prince for management by Prince Line. In 1949 she was sold to Atlantic Freighters Ltd of Panama and renamed Atlantic Star. Acquired by Faik Zeren of Istanbul and renamed Nadir in 1961 she continued to trade until 1971 when she was broken up at Eregli.

EMPIRE ALLENBY was built in 1945 by J. L. Thompson & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 9904grt, a length of 503ft 4in, a beam of 64ft 5in and a service speed of 15 knots. One of three fast standard ships from Thompson’s yard she was launched on 18th October 1944 for the Ministry of War Transport with Prince Line as managers. With this type of ship no crew members were berthed in the forecastle because of the risk of hitting a mine. The officers were accommodated amidships and the crew in the poop. She was acquired by the Union-Castle Mail Steamship Co. Ltd in March 1946 and renamed Drakensburg Castle and re-registered in Cape Town in the June. Because their speed was in excess of normal peacetime requirements for a cargo ship the working life of the fast standard ship was considerably less than other classes and, consequently, she arrived at Hong Kong on 5th August 1915 where she was broken up by the Hong Kong Salvage & Towage Co.

SAMTREDY was built in 1943 by California Shipbuilding Co. at Los Angeles with a tonnage of 7219grt, a length of 422ft 10in, a beam of 57ft and a service speed of 11 knots. A Liberty ship launched in September 1943 as the John Tipton for the US War Administration she was bareboat chartered to the Ministry of War Transport who renamed her Samtredy for management by Prince Line. She was acquired by Furness, Withy & Co. in 1947 for their North Pacific routes and renamed Pacific Importer. In 1953 she was sold to Ditta Luigi Pittaluga of Genoa who changed her name to Aquitania. Twelve years later she became the Aya Marina when she was sold to Akrotiri Steam Ship Co. of Monrovia in 1965. In February 1969 she was arrested in Rio de Janeiro for unpaid port dues and was broken up in the following December.

SAMAVON was built in 1943 by New England Shipbuilding Corp at Portland, Maine with a tonnage of 7219grt, a length of 422ft 10in, a beam of 57ft and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Samtredy she was launched as the Bronson Alcott for the US War Administration but completed as the Samavon for the Ministry of War Transport with Prince Line as managers. She was acquired by Furness, Withy in 1947 and renamed Pacific Nomad. In 1954 she was sold to the Panama Steam Ship Co. of Monrovia who changed her name to Nikolos. She was purchased by the Diana Maritime Corp. of Monrovia in 1960 and renamed Stamatis. On 3rd November 1966 during a voyage from Madras to Calcutta she was lost in a typhoon when her anchors failed to hold her in the Madras Roads. She was blown ashore some 3 miles from the port and a second typhoon on the 10th November rendered salvage impossible and she was subsequently demolished where she lay.

SAMDARING was built in 1944 by New England Shipbuilding Corp at Portland, Maine with a tonnage of 7219grt, a length of 422ft 10in, a beam of 57ft and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Samtredy she was completed as the Samdaring and chartered to the Ministry of War Transport with Prince Line as managers. In 1974 she was acquired by Furness, Withy and renamed Pacific Ranger. She was sold to Cia. Naviera Somelga of Panama in 1952 who renamed her San Dimitris. After six years she became the Priaruggia when she was acquired, in 1958, by Albaro Societa Italiana di Nav. of Genoa. In 1960 she cracked amidships, was cut into two and the after part joined to the company’s Albaro which had been condemned with engine failure. As the Albaro she traded until 1963 when she was sold to the Aegean Cia. Nav. S. A. of Pireaus who changed her name to Aigion. After a further five years trading she was scrapped at Osaka during 1968.

SAMLONG was built in 1943 by New England Shipbuilding Corp at Portland, Maine with a tonnage of 7219grt, a length of 422ft 10in, a beam of 57ft and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Samtredy she was launched as the Elias H. Derby for the US War Shipping Administration but on completion was bareboat chartered to the Ministry of War Transport as the Samlong with Prince Line as managers. On D Day 6th June 1944 she sailed from Tilbury to Normandy. She was damaged on 3rd August by an explosion , probably by a mine, when in the Thames Estuary and was towed back to Tilbury. In 1945 she was laid up in the River Blackwater where she remained until 1948 when she was towed to Hendrik ido Ambacht and broken up during 1949.

SAMTUCKY was built in 1943 by New England Shipbuilding Co. at Portland, Maine with a tonnage of 7219grt, a length of 422ft 10in, a beam of 57ft and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Samtredy she was launched as the William Blackstone for the US War Shipping Administration but completed for the Ministry of War Transport as the Samtucky with Prince Line as managers. She was laid up by the Ministry of Transport in 1947 and in the following year reverted to the United States Marine Commission as the William Blackstone. Placed in the Reserve Fleet she remained in the James River until February 1962 when she was broken up at Panama City, Florida.

OCEAN VENTURE was built in 1941 by Permanent Metals Corp. Shipyard No.1 at Richmond, California with a tonnage of 7174grt, a length of 441ft 6in, a beam of 57ft and a service speed of 12 knots. Formerly the Todd-California Shipbuilding Corp. the Permanent Metals Corp was incorporated when Henry Kaiser put together a syndicate to build 60 standard ships. Completed in December 1941 she was bareboat chartered to the Ministry of War Transport as the Ocean Venture with Prince Line as managers. On 8th February 1942 she was torpedoed by U-108 in the Atlantic position 37 05N 74 46W.

OCEAN VIRTUE was built in 1941 by Permanent Metals Corp. Shipyard No.1 at Richmond, California with a tonnage of 7174grt, a length of 441ft 6in, a beam of 57ft and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Ocean Venture she was completed in July 1942 as the Ocean Virtue for the Ministry of War Transport with Prince Line as managers. On 21st July 1943 she took part in Operation Husky, the invasion of Sicily, during which she was damaged by bombs and settled in shallow water. She was subsequently salvaged and in 1948 sold to Giacomo Costa fu Andrea Costa who renamed her Andrea C. In 1959 she was converted into a passenger ship and her length increased to 446ft 10in. Further rebuilding took place in 1965 when a forecastle was added and a continuous deck to the stern was incorporated. The tall pepperpot funnel and the mainmast was removed. On 17th October 1981 she completed her cruising season at Genoa and was laid up until 15th December 1982 when she arrived at La Spezia for demolition.

EMPIRE PATROL was built in 1928 by Stabilimento Tecnico at Trieste with a tonnage of 3220grt, a length of 317ft 2in, a beam of 44ft 10in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed as the Rodi for Cia. Adriatica di Nav. of Bari and on 10th June 1940 was taken as a prize at Malta and renamed Empire Patrol. In 1942 she was taken over by the Ministry of War Transport and placed under the management of Prince Line. On 29th September 1945 during a voyage from Port Said to Castelorizo with 500 Greeks returning home she caught fire when 38 miles out. As the fire took control the passengers were taken off and many jumped into the sea. She was taken in tow but on 3rd October capsized and sank when 15 miles from Port Said with the loss of 38 lives.

HELVIG was built in 1937 by Helsingors Jernsk Msk at Helsingor with a tonnage of 2250grt, a length of 345ft 6in, a beam of 45ft 11in and a service speed of 11 knots. She was one of four similar sisters built for A. Schmieglow & Axel Kampen’s D/S A/S ‘Torm’ of Copenhagen and traded between the Levant ports and New York with fruit. In 1940 she was acquired by the Ministry of War Transport for use by the Royal Navy as a mine depot ship. She returned to the MOWT in 1941 and placed under the management of Prince Line until 1945 when she was returned to her owners. In 1951 she was renamed Helvig Torm when she was sold to Dampskibsselskabet Torm A/S of Copenhagen with Axel Kampen & Carl M. Andersen as managers. In 1961 she was sold to the Ruthi Shipping Corp. of Piraeus and renamed Ruthi. Three years later she was acquired by Chripat Cia Naviera S. A. of Piraeus who changed her name to Kallipateira. On 15th October 1968, during a voyage from Constanza to Port Sudan via west African ports, she put into Las Palmas with engine trouble. During a storm she was blown ashore on Alcalavaneros Reef, was damaged beyond repair and broken up locally.

THYRA S was built in 1936 by Nakskov Skibsvarft at Nakskov with a tonnage of 1775grt, a length of 322ft, a beam of 42ft 8in and a service speed of 11 knots. She was completed as the Thyra S for A. Schmieglow & Axel Kampen’s A/S D/S ‘Torm’ of Copenhagen. In April 1940 she ended up in England and in 1941was acquired by the Ministry of War Transport and placed under the management of Prince Line until 1945 when she was returned to her owners. In 1951 she was renamed Thyra Torm when she was sold to Dampskibsselskabet Torm A/S of Copenhagen. She was sold to Marcos Kappotas of Pireaus in 1962 and renamed Akti. On 29th March 1963 she caught fire while berthed at Bougie and was scuttled. Subsequently raised she was found to be totally gutted and consequently towed to Savona where she arrived on 16th March 1964 for demolition.

MALTESE PRINCE was built in 1946 by Burntisland Shipbuilding Co. at Burntisland with a tonnage of 2361grt, a length of 334ft 6in, a beam of 46ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed in December 1946 for trading to the Mediterranean. In 1963 she was sold to the Constellation Shipping Co. of Limassol, renamed Coronis and placed under the management of G. M. Lignos. Four years later, in 1967, she was acquired without a change of name by Cia de Nav. Diamondi S. A. with N. Cotzias (Shipping) Ltd of Pireaus as managers. She was laid up in Perama Bay during 1972 and broken up at Istanbul in 1973.

CYPRIAN PRINCE (4) was built in 1949 by Burntisland Shipbuilding Co. at Burntisland with a tonnage of 2358grt, a length of 334ft 6in, a beam of 46ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Maltese Prince she was completed in September 1949 for Prince Line with Furness, Withy & Co. as managers. After eighteen years with the company she was sold to Anastassis Shipping of Famagusta who renamed her Agios Dionisios. In 1972 she was renamed Irene’s Wish when she was acquired by Starshine Cia Naveira S. A. of Piraeus and in the following year she was named Fulmar Trader when sold to Zeus Enalios Nav. Ltd of Famagusta. On 10th January 1976 during a voyage from Spezia to Lagos she suffered severe damage as the result of a fire in the engine room and was towed into Palma de Majorca. It was the intention to take her to Piraeus for an inspection but on 14th February she sank off Palermo during the tow to Greece. (Photo: JK Byass)

CINGALESE PRINCE (2) was built in 1950 by Vickers, Armstrong Ltd at Newcastle with a tonnage of 8827grt, a length of 470ft 10in, a beam of 63ft 2in and a service speed of 14 knots. She was completed in September 1950 for Prince Line with Furness, Withy & Co. as managers. In April 1960 she was chartered to Shaw, Saville & Albion, given SSA funnel livery and renamed Gallic. She returned to Prince Line as the Cingalese Prince in 1962 and remained with the company until 15th January 1964 when she was sold to Bibby Bros. of Liverpool who renamed her Gloucestershire. In 1971 she was sold to Ferguson International Shipping of Hong Kong for disposal and in 1971 under the direction of Ribble Shipping Ltd. of Liverpool and managed by Patt, Mansfield & Co. she was renamed Cresco and undertook a loaded voyage to the Far East. She arrived at Whampoa on 17th September 1972 where she was broken up.

EASTERN PRINCE (5) was built in 1950 by Vickers, Armstrong Ltd at Newcastle with a tonnage of 8827grt, a length of 470ft 10in, a beam of 63ft 2in and a service speed of 14 knots. Sister of the Cingalese Prince she was completed in October 1950 for Prince Line with Furness, Withy & Co. as managers. In April 1960 she was chartered to Shaw, Saville & Albion, given SSA funnel livery and renamed Bardic. On 26th February 1964 she was sold to Bibby Bros. of Liverpool who renamed her Staffordshire. On 30th November 1970 during a voyage from Liverpool to Rangoon she put into Colombo with engine trouble and was sold there for £122,000. She was subsequently towed to Hong Kong where she arrived on 16th March 1971 and was broken up by Fuji Marden & Co.

AFRIC/SCOTTISH PRINCE (5) was built in 1950 by Burntisland Shipbuilding Co. at Burntisland with a tonnage of 3364grt, a length of 363ft 2in, a beam of 51ft 2in and a service speed of 14 knots. She was completed in November 1950 as the Afric for Prince Line but for charter to Shaw, Saville & Albion with Furness, Withy as managers. In 1955 she was chartered to the Pacific Steam Navigation Co. and renamed Albemarle for use on an experimental service between Bermuda, the Caribbean ports and Panama. She returned to Prince Line in 1957 and was renamed Scottish Prince. After eleven years she was sold in 1968 to the Klymnos Shipping Co. of Cyprus who changed her name to Grigorios. In 1972 she was acquired by the Milos Steam Ship Co. for Cyprus who renamed her Milos and then in 1975 changed her name to Nestor. On 23rd December 1977 she arrived at Gadani Beach where she was broken up.

EGYPTIAN PRINCE (5) was built in 1951 by Burntisland Shipbuilding Co. at Burntisland with a tonnage of 3364grt, a length of 363ft 2in, a beam of 51ft 2in and a service speed of 14 knots. Sister of the Scottish Prince she was delivered to Prince Line in January 1951. On 7th July 1967 she was damaged following a collision with Iberian Tankers Co’s Waneta and was repaired at Smiths Docks at North Shields. Following the repairs she was sold to Agia Irini Shipping Co. of Famagusta who renamed her Nikolas S. On 10th April 1972 she arrived at Hong Kong where she was broken up.

BLACK PRINCE (4) was built in 1955 by Burntisland Shipbuilding Co. at Burntisland with a tonnage of 3597grt, a length of 372ft, a beam of 52ft 11in and a service speed of 14.5 knots. She was delivered to Prince Line in March 1955 and had accommodation for 12 passengers. In 1971 she was sold to Intermar Services Co. S. A. of Panama with G. Bobolas as manager. On 20th March 1977 during a voyage from Las Palmas and Port Harcourt she was abandoned by her crew after a fire in the engine room and was last seen on the following day well ablaze and presumably sank.
(Photo: Laurence Dunn Collection)

WESTERN PRINCE (2) was built in 1955 by Harland & Wolff at Govan with a tonnage of 7917grt, a length of 466ft 10in, a beam of 61ft 4in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was completed in April 1955 as the Western Prince for Prince Line Ltd. In 1957 she was chartered to Shaw, Saville & Albion and renamed Zealandic with Furness, Withy & Co. as managers. Six years later she was transferred to Manchester Liners, a Furness, Withy subsidiary, as the Manchester Trader and in 1969 reverted to Prince Line as the Western Prince. She was sold to the Saint Nicolas Shipping Co. of Cyprus for £380,000 in 1971 and was renamed Mariner. On 29th March 1973 during a voyage from Havana to Kobe she was abandoned after springing a leak.

SOUTHERN PRINCE (2) was built in 1955 by Harland & Wolff at Govan with a tonnage of 7917grt, a length of 466ft 10in, a beam of 61ft 4in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Western Prince she was completed for Prince Line in March 1956. In 1958 she was chartered to Shaw, Saville & Albion and renamed Medic until 1960 when she reverted to Prince Line and her original name. She was briefly transferred to the Royal Mail Line in 1971 before being sold to Eastern Glory Enterprising Co. of Mogadishu who renamed her Argosy. The Eastern Glory Enterprising Co. was one of several companies set up by the Communist Chinese in Marxist Somali. She was acquired by the Orient Prosperity Maritime S. A. of Panama in 1977 when her name was changed to Oriental Prosperity. Later in the same year she was sold to Topaz Maritime S.A. of Panama who renamed her Topaz. On 6th March 1978 she arrived at Kaohsuing where she was broken up. (Photo: Mersey Photos)

NORMAN PRINCE (5) was built in 1956 by Burntisland Shipbuilding Co. at Burntisland with a tonnage of 2709grt, a length of 334ft 6in, a beam of 46ft 6in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was built for Prince Line’s Mediterranean trade under the management of Furness, Withy & Co. and delivered in February 1956. In 1968 she was sold to E. H. Maritime Poseidon Ltd of Famagusta who changed her name to Salamina and in 1971 she was acquired by Oinnoussai Shipping Ltd of Famagusta who renamed her Dalmarin. Three years later she was trading as the Dodo under the ownership of SAM Import & Export Co. (South Africa) Ltd of Panama. In 1975 she was sold to IGS Shipping S. A. of Panama who changed her name to George S I under the management of I. G. Skazikas. Later in 1975 she was renamed P. Dolores by I G Skazikas Shipping S. A. of Panama. On 7th October 1975 during a voyage from Greece to Lagos she was abandoned near Lanzarote after a fire in her engine room and eventually drifted ashore at Tarfaya in Morocco where she was wrecked.

NORTHUMBRIAN PRINCE was built in 1956 by Burntisland Shipbuilding Co. at Burntisland with a tonnage of 2709grt, a length of 334ft 6in, a beam of 46ft 6in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Norman Prince she was actually ordered as the ‘Novocastrian Prince’ but was delivered in June 1956 as the Northumbrian Prince. In 1968 she was sold to Eleftherotria Shipping Co. of Famagusta and renamed Eleftherotria. She was acquired by Pallas Maritime Co. of Famagusta in 1972 when her name was changed to Rodania and in 1976 she was renamed Omar before being sold to Atlantic Maritime Co. of Valletta. In 1984 she was purchased by Schemcokumar Prakashdev Shourie of Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates who changed her name to Suraj. Her name was changed to Karari in 1985 prior to her going to Gadani Beach where she was broken up in the June. (Photo: Prince Line Ltd)

LANCASTRIAN PRINCE (5) was built in 1960 by Burntisland Shipbuilding Co. at Burntisland with a tonnage of 4960grt, a length of 372ft, a beam of 52ft 11in and a service speed of 14.5 knots. She was completed in September 1960 for Prince Line with Furness, Withy & Co. as managers. In 1971 she was sold to Navios Panoceanica S. A. of Panama, part of the Hadjilias Group, and renamed Tamara. She was acquired by Erymanthos Maritime Co. of Pireaus in 1980 when her name was changed to Amar. Two years later she was owned by the Bavaria Maritime Co. S. A. of Panama and trading with the same name. In July 1983 she was broken up at Bombay. (Photo: Skyphotos)

STUART PRINCE (5) was built in 1960 by Wm. Doxford & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 12668grt, a length of 559ft 4in, a beam of 72ft and a service speed of 14.5 knots. An oil tanker she was launched for Prince Line on 9th August 1960 and completed her trials in the following November. In 1971 she was transferred to the Furness, Withy subsidary Pacific Maritime services Ltd., renamed Stolt Stuart and converted into a chemical parcels tanker as part of a four ship deal with Stolt-Nielsens Rederi A/S of Haugesund. Two years later all four ships were sold to Stolt-Nielsen and operated by the Moniwell Corp. of Monrovia. In 1976 she was acquired by Soc. Naviera Ultragas Ltd. of Valparaiso and renamed Llaima. She was sold to Transmares Naviera Internacional S. A. of Panama in 1982 who then sold her to Eckhardt & Co. GmbH, a firm of ship breaking brokers, who received the ship on 16th August at Chittagong. On 3rd September she was then handed over to the ship breakers at Chittagong. Eckhardt’s of Hamburg buy ships and then sell to a breaker with available yard or beach space and earn about 5% profit on the turnaround.

TUDOR PRINCE (4) was built in 1960 by Wm. Doxford & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 12668grt, a length of 559ft 4in, a beam of 72ft and a service speed of 14.5 knots. Sister of the Stuart Prince she was launched on 20th December 1960 and handed over to Prince Line in the following April. During her eleven career with Prince Line she also served in Furness, Withy livery with a black hull and no feathers on her funnel. In 1971 she was part of the Stolt-Nielsen deal and renamed Stolt Tudor. She was acquired by Stolt-Nielsen in 1973 and was operated by their Moniwel Corporation until 1975 when she was sold to the Monitron Shipping Corp. of Monrovia who renamed her Stolta. In 1977 she was purchased by Sicula Partenopea di Nav. SpA. of Palermo who changed her name to Stolta Azurra. Nine years later, in 1986, she was trading for Petrolnavi Srl of Italy with the name Azurra and on 17th December 1987 arrived at Gadani Beach where she was broken up. (Photo: John Clarkson Collection)

ENGLISH PRINCE (2) was built in 1954 by Burntisland Shipbuilding Co. at Burntisland with a tonnage of 3596grt, a length of 372ft, a beam of 52ft 10in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was completed in October 1954 as the Beechmore for Johnston-Warren Lines Ltd and transferred to Prince Line in 1965 when she was renamed English Prince. In December 1968, when at Charleston, USA, she was damaged by a fire in her cargo of cotton and consequently sold to the Aegeon Shipping Co. of Famagusta who renamed her Mandraki. She was sold to Reign Maritime Co. of Pireaus in 1972, placed under the management of Marcrecida Cia. Nav. S. A. and renamed Naftilos. Three years later she was trading as the Mariber for Deepdene Maritime S. A. of Piraeus and in 1975 was laid up pending repairs. In 1977 she was acquired by Marinegra Shipping Co. of Limassol, Cyprus and renamed Mari. On 7th July 1978, during a voyage from Rijeka to Alexandria she caught fire off the Yugoslav coast and was beached on Dugi Otok Island near Zadar. She was refloated on 22nd September and subsequently scrapped at Split.

AFRICAN PRINCE (4) was built in 1955 by Burntisland Shipbuilding Co. at Burntisland with a tonnage of 3597grt, a length of 372ft, a beam of 52ft 10in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the English Prince she was completed in June 1855 as the Pinemore for Johnston-Warren Lines Ltd and transferred to Prince Line as the African Prince in 1965. In 1971 she was sold to Maldive Investments Ltd of London who operated her as the Maldive Mail for the Maldive Steam Ship Co. On 31st May 1975, during a voyage from Karachi to Singapore, she caught fire of Veravel, India and dropped her anchor. The blazing ship was abandoned and subsequently drifted ashore where she broke in two and became a total loss. (Photo: John Clarkson Collection)

MERCHANT PRINCE (3) was built in 1950 by Burntisland Shipbuilding Co. at Burntisland with a tonnage of 3343grt, a length of 363ft 1in, a beam of 51ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was completed in February 1950 as the Sycamore for Johnston-Warren Lines Ltd’s Mediterranean services. In 1955 she was chartered to Watts, Watts & Co. and renamed Walsingham until 1957 when she reverted to Sycamore. Transferred to Prince Line Ltd and renamed Merchant Prince in 1965 she remained with the company until 1968 when she was sold to Kaldelion Shipping Co., Poseidon Shipping Agencies of London who changed her name to Elias L. In 1973 she was purchased by Maccomar Shipping Co. of Limassol who renamed her Jara and in 1975 was sold to Melteco Navigation Ltd who changed her name to Meltemi for operation by Fulmar Navigation Co. of Nicosia. Two years later she was trading as the Temi for the Green Spirit Inc. of Limassol under the same management and on 10th May 1979 she arrived at Gadani Beach where she was broken up.

SPARTAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1954 by Cammell, Laird (Shipbuilders & Engineers) Ltd at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 1202grt, a length of 256ft 4in, a beam of 38ft 7in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was completed in March 1954 as Cheshire Coast for Coast Lines. In 1967 she was chartered to T & J Brocklebank for their Mediterranean services during the period when the Suez Canal was blocked and renamed Malabar. She was chartered to Prince Line Ltd as the Spartan Prince in 1968 and remained with company until 1971 when she reverted to Cheshire Coast before being sold to the Amanda Shipping Co. of Famagusta who renamed her Venture. In 1974 she was sold to the Skiros Shipping Co. of Famagusta and traded as the Azelia until June 1980 when she was broken up by Soc. Industrial de Productos Siderurgicos S. A. of Cartagena.

Prince Line

TROJAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1954 by Charles Hill & Co. at Bristol with a tonnage of 1283grt, a length of 256ft 4in, a beam of 38ft 7in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Spartan Prince she was completed as the Lancashire Coast for Coast Lines Ltd in April 1954. In 1968 she was chartered to Prince Line Ltd as the Trojan Prince but only until the following year when she reverted to her former name. In 1980 she was sold to the United West Desert for Development S de RL, with A. Attila Shipping & Trading Co. of Piraeus as managers, renamed Paolino and converted into a livestock carrier for sheep. She was broken up in 1985.

CELTIC PRINCE (2) was built in 1968 by Schps. V/h De Groot at Slikkerveer with a tonnage of 1439grt, a length of 254ft 10in, a beam of 39ft 9in and a service speed of 12.5 knots. She was completed as the Arbon for N. V. Arbon, a single ship company managed by W. F. Kampmann’s Bevrachingsbedrifj of Willemstad, and immediately chartered to Prince Line Ltd as the Celtic Prince. She came off charter in 1977 and reverted to her former name. In 1983 she was purchased by Turbo Shipping Co. of Willemstad and on 1st November 1989, during a voyage from Surinam to Rotterdam, she capsized and sank off Paramaibo with the loss of two lives.

SAILOR PRINCE (4) was built in 1957 by Ottensener A. G. at Hamburg with a tonnage of 2055grt, a length of 334ft 4in, a beam of 45ft 6in and a service speed of 14 knots. She was completed in May 1957 as the Velarde for MacAndrews & Co. Ltd of London and chartered to Prince Line Ltd. in 1969 when her name was changed to Sailor Prince. When she came off charter during 1970 she was sold to Tropica Armadora S. A. of Panama who renamed her Zenit. In 1973 she was acquired by Losinska Plovidba oour Brogarstvo of Losinje and renamed Nadir. On 27th April 1987 she arrived at Split where she was broken up.

TARTAR PRINCE (3) was built in 1959 by Travewerft GmbH at Lubeck with a tonnage of 1187grt, a length of 249ft 5in, a beam of 39ft 9in and a service speed of 13 knots. She was completed in January 1959 as the Egret for the British & Continental Steamship Co. of Liverpool and chartered to Prince Line Ltd. in 1969 and renamed Tartar Prince. Managed briefly by P. A. van Es & Co. of Liverpool she came off charter in 1971 and was immediately sold to Heerema Maritime Services S. A. of Panama. She arrived in Rotterdam on 15th October 1971 for conversion into the survey ship Surveyor for owner Surveyor Shipping Inc. of Panama. Used for oil field drilling work all trace was lost by 1990 when she was no longer registered.

GOTHIC PRINCE (2) was built in 1955 by De Merwde NV. at Hardinxveld with a tonnage of 1938grt, a length of 304ft 11in, a beam of 42ft 5in and a service speed of 13 knots. She was completed in May 1955 as the Prins Willem III for the Oranje Line N. V. of Rotterdam and sold to the Parnon Shipping Co. of Piraeus in 1968 and renamed Amaryllis. Chartered to Prince Line Ltd. in 1969 and renamed Gothic Prince she operated with the company until 1969 when she came off charter and was sold to County Cia. Naviera S. A. of Piraeus. Renamed Xeny she traded until 2nd December 1975 when she was abandoned off Spain when she caught fire during a voyage from Port Harcourt to Rotterdam. On 1st January 1976 she was towed into Cadiz Roads and on the following day capsized and sank at anchor.

GAELIC PRINCE (2) was built in 1956 by Amsterdamsche D. D. Maatschappij with a tonnage of 1938grt, a length of 304ft 11in, a beam of 42ft 5in and a service speed of 13 knots. Sister of the Gothic Prince she was completed as the Prins Willem V for the Oranje Line N. V. of Rotterdam. She was purchased by Verina Shipping Corp of Piraeus in 1967 and renamed Mina for chartering out. Prince Line Ltd chartered her in 1969 as the Gaelic Prince but only until the following year when she reverted to Mina. In 1971 she was acquired by the Livadia Shipping Co. of Famagusta who renamed her Marinos. Two years later she was trading as the Araxos for owners Banimar Shipping Co. of Piraeus and in 1979 was sold to Maharaj Bros. of South Africa. On 21st May 1979 her midships were destroyed by fire and she was towed to Port Elizabeth where she was laid up. She was eventually broken up at Durban in October 1981.

SLAVIC PRINCE (2) was built in 1954 by Scheepswerft ‘De Biesboch’. at Dordrecht with a tonnage of 1475grt, a length of 257ft 11in, a beam of 42ft 6in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. She was launched on 8th December 1953 for the Great Lakes service and completed in 1954 as the Ville de Quebec for Cie General d’Armement Maritime. In 1969 she was sold for £100,000 to Nortena Naviera S. A. of Piraeus who renamed her Suzy. She was then chartered to Prince Line as the Slavic Prince but operated under the Greek flag, with a Greek crew and one Prince liaison officer. In 1970 she reverted to Suzy and on 20th August 1972, during a voyage from Durres to Patras she sank off the Albanian shortly after leaving port with the loss of 11 lives.

MALVERN PRINCE was built in 1970 by Grangemouth Dockyard Co. at Grangemouth with a tonnage of 1459grt, a length of 283ft 10in, a beam of 47ft 6in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. The first of four ships ordered to replaced those chartered she was completed in May 1970 for Prince Line Ltd with Furness, Withy & Co. as managers. She was sold to the Vietnam Government in 1981, renamed Victory 1 and placed under the management of Victory Shipping S. A. of Panama. In 1986 the management contract was terminated and ownership transferred to the Vietnam Sea Transport & Chartering Co. of Ho Chi Min City (Saigon) who renamed her Thang Loi 01. In 2001 she was still trading but with the name slightly changed to Thang Loi-01. (Photo: John Clarkson Collection)

CHILTERN PRINCE was built in 1970 by Clelands Shipbuilding Co. at Wallsend with a tonnage of 1459grt, a length of 285ft, a beam of 47ft 6in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. Sister of the Malvern Prince she was completed in June 1970 as the Chiltern Prince. In 1981 she was sold to the Vietnamese Government who renamed her Friendship for management by Vina-Cub Shipping Co. S.A. of Panama. She was renamed Thang Loi 02 by the Vietnam Sea Transport & Chartering Co. of Saigon in 1986 and in 2001 she was still trading but with the name slightly changed to Thang Loi-02.

MENDIP PRINCE/CHEVIOT PRINCE was built in 1970 by Clelands Shipbuilding Co. at Wallsend with a tonnage of 1459grt, a length of 285ft, a beam of 47ft 6in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. Sister of the Malvern Prince she was completed as the Mendip Prince in October 1970 but for some undisclosed reason Prince Line changed her name to Cheviot Prince in 1974. She was sold to Qatar National Navigation & Transport Co. of Sharjah in 1979 and briefly renamed Qatar 1 before it was changed to Rashidah by her owner. On 21st May 1987, during a voyage from Umm Said to Kuwait she was attacked and damaged by Iranian gunboats 45 miles off Ras al Khafi. She was later repaired at Kuwait where she arrived on 23rd May. In 1992 operations were transferred to subsidiary company Marco Shipping of Dubai with Marwan Shipping & trading Co. of Kingstown, Grenadines as managers. She was acquired by Queen Navigation Co. of Kingstown in 1996 and renamed Karim. At the beginning of 2002 it appears that she is no longer trading.

COTSWOLD PRINCE was built in 1970 by Clelands Shipbuilding Co. at Wallsend with a tonnage of 1459grt, a length of 285ft, a beam of 47ft 6in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. Sister of the Malvern Prince she was completed in December 1970. In 1979 she was sold to the Reef Shipping Agencies of Gibraltar and renamed Fijian. Her owners chartered her out in 1981 as the Onehunga and she reverted to Fijian when she came off charter in 1983. She was transferred to Suva in 1985 when she came under the ownership of the Blackfoot Shipping Ltd. In 1990 she was renamed Cotswold Prince in by Blackfoot Shipping and registry was transferred to New Zealand. She was acquired by L. D. Marine & Ship Repairs Pty of Launceston with L. D. Shipping as managers and at the beginning of 2002 is still trading. (Photo: John Clarkson Collection)

SAXON PRINCE (4) was built in 1971 by E. J. Smit & Zoon’s Scheeps at Westerbroek with a tonnage of 1581grt, a length of 262ft 1in, a beam of 39ft 4in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was launched in March 1971 as the Cairntrader for the Cairn Line with Shaw, Saville & Albion as managers but completed as the Saxon Prince for Prince Line under the same management. In 1975 she reverted to Cairntrader and then back to Saxon Prince in 1976 before she was sold to Van Nievelt, Goudriaan & Co. B. V. of Rotterdam who renamed her Adara. She was sold in 1986 to Waterdrive Marine of Cyprus who renamed her Andara and in 1990 to Interfront Shipping Ltd of Cyprus who operated her as the Parana Star. In 1992 she was acquired by Astarte Shipping Ltd of Cyprus and managed by Humber Agency A. B. of Malmo as the Pamela. On 8th February 1995 she was arrested for non payment of port dues when she anchored at Falmouth. In the following year she was purchased by Ship Depot Ltd of St. Vincent & Grenadines, given a red hull and renamed Arana. In 1997 she was renamed Karim 1 when acquired by the Elreedy Shipping Co. of Belize and in 2001 was still trading but with undisclosed owners. (Photo: World Ship Society)

NORDIC PRINCE was built in 1971 by E. J. Smit & Zoon’s Scheeps at Westerbroek with a tonnage of 1587grt, a length of 262ft 2in, a beam of 39ft 4in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Saxon Prince she was completed as the Bretwalda for Hall Brothers Steam Ship Co. of Newcastle in June 1971. She was chartered to Prince Line as the Nordic Prince in 1976 and reverted to Bretwalda when she came off charter in 1978. In 1979 she was sold to Downlands Shipping Inc. of Monrovia who renamed her Lady Sarah. On 28th May 1984, during a voyage from Antwerp to Algiers, she caught fire off Cape Caxine and was abandoned. She was towed to Algiers and was scuttled by the Port Authority still ablaze.

TUDOR PRINCE (5) was built in 1969 by Gebrudder Van Diepen at Waterhuizen with a tonnage of 1400grt, a length of 263ft 1in, a beam of 39ft 4in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Saxon Prince she was completed as the Lise Nielsen in September 1969 for D/D A/S Progress of Copenhagen with M. Nielsen as manager. She was chartered to Prince Line as the Tudor Prince in January 1974. On 17th February 1974, during a voyage from London to Limassol, she hit the rocks at the entrance to Valetta harbour and sank in shallow water. Raised on 4th December she remained in Malta for four months while repairs were completed and then sold to Sea Malta Ltd. who renamed her Bormla. In 1984 she was sold to the Norwegian Trans Shipping Ltd of Nassau who and changed her name to Cariwood Lilian and in 1986 to Arne O. Steen Shipping of the Cayman Islands who renamed her Steen Falcon. Two years later she became the Serena when acquired by the Stadion Marine Co. of Valetta and Sandra G when purchased by the Olivine Shipping Co. of Cyprus in 1989. On 17th July 1991, during a voyage to Puerto de Santa Maria she caught fire in the engine room and was towed to Cadiz. Declared a total loss she left on 8th August under tow and bound for Portugal where she was scrapped.

BRITISH PRINCE (4) was built in 1971 by Gebrudder Van Diepen at Waterhuizen with a tonnage of 1560grt, a length of 262ft 3in, a beam of 39ft 4in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Tudor Prince she was completed as the White Crest for Hall Brothers Steam Ship Co. of Newcastle in August 1971. In 1972 she was chartered to Prince Line as the British Prince but reverted to her original name in the following year when she came off charter. She was sold to Agenzia Marittima Albioni SrL of Viareggio and renamed Vagero in 1979. In 1990 her owners were recorded as being Societa Marittima Flegea SnC of Viareggio and in 1990 she was trading as the Bars for B.A.R.S. Nav. Co. of Kingstown in the Grenadines. She was purchased by Abdullah Trabolsi of Tripoli, Syria in 1995 and renamed Siadik. In the following year she was acquired by unnamed Hondurian owners who renamed her Osman J. and thereafter all trace of her was lost.

PENNINE PRINCE/SAILOR PRINCE (4)/SOLDIER PRINCE (3) was built in 1971 by N.V. Isselwerf at Rotterdam with a tonnage of 1599grt, a length of 281ft 11in, a beam of 45ft 5in and a service speed of 16 knots. Prince Line’s only twin funnelled ship was completed as the Pennine Prince in July 1971 with Pacific Maritime Services as registered owner and Shaw, Saville & Albion as managers. She was renamed Sailor Prince in 1972 and Soldier Prince in 1977. In 1979 she was sold to Unicorn Ocean Shipping of Monrovia with Intershipping Management Ltd of London as managers and renamed Alfa. She was acquired by Wandia Nav. Co. of London in 1984 who changed her name to Phaedra for management by G. Frangoulis. Her name was changed to Transporter in 1987 by her owners and on 14th September of that year she was damaged by fire off Piraeus. On 19th November she left under tow for Aliaga where she was broken up. (Photo: Laurence Dunn Collection)

TROJAN PRINCE (4) was built in 1966 by Schiffswerf Heinrich Brand A.G. at Oldeburg with a tonnage of 999grt, a length of 260ft 10in, a beam of 40ft 11in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. She was built as the Lockflethersand for Parten Reederei Lockflethersand of Brake with Sielwall-Reederei H. Renzel K. G. as managers. In 1971 she was sold to Helmut Meyer of Brake and in December of that year to A. H. Basse & Co. of Copenhagen who renamed her Per Basse. Acquired by the Cybas Shipping Co. of Limassol and renamed Daneriver in 1972 she was chartered to Prince Line as the Trojan Prince in 1973. In the following year she was sold to Contimar Zonder & Schiecher A.G. of Hamburg who changed her name to Conti Misr. By 1981 she was trading as the Sail II for Ali Salim & Partners of Kyrenia under the Turkish flag. She was renamed Roule by her owners in 1985. On 23rd July 1985 she was extensively burnt amidships when she was hit by a shell from an Israeli warship when berthed at Sidon. On completion of her repairs she emerged as the Sail II but was later renamed Palmyra with Beirut as her Port of Registry. In 1993 she was renamed Abeer-S when acquired by the Samin Shipping Co. of Latakia, Syria and in the following year her name was changed to Al-Haji Amneh when she was sold to the Al Amin Shipping Co. of Tartous, Syria. According to the 2001 Shipwatch Directory she is no longer trading.

SARACEN PRINCE was built in 1975 by J. J. Sietas GmbH at Hamburg with a tonnage of 999grt, a length of 267ft, a beam of 44ft 7in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. She was launched in 1975 as the Komet for Reederei ‘Komet’ with Henry Gerdau of Hamburg as manager and on completion she was chartered as the Saracen Prince to Prince Line. In the following year she came off charter and reverted to Komet. She was chartered out again in 1979 as the Bourgogne. In 1989 she was acquired by Heino Behrmann of Hamburg and renamed Heinrich Behrmann. She is still trading with that name for Stuewe & Co Schiffahrts GmbH & Co. KG.

TROJAN PRINCE (5) was built in 1976 by B. V. Bodeswas Scheeps at Martenshoek with a tonnage of 1140grt, a length of 258ft 6in, a beam of 43ft and a service speed of 12 knots. Launched on 3rd February 1976 as the Inge Danielsen for Otto Danielsen. Red. D/S A/S Progress of Copenhagen she was chartered to Prince Line on completion as the Trojan Prince. In 1977 she came off charter and reverted to her original name. She was transferred to K/S Inge Progress and renamed Inge Progress in 1987 under the same ownership. In 1989 she was sold to Golden Banner Shipping S. A. of Panama and renamed Golden Banner for management by P. T. Lumintu Sinar Perkasa. She is still trading with that name and ownership.

STUART PRINCE (6) was built in 1972 by Schiffswerf Korneuburg A/S at Korneuburg with a tonnage of 1000grt, a length of 296ft 7in, a beam of 48ft 5in and a service speed of 14 knots. One of five sisters she was built as the Joachim for Peter Dohle’s Partenreederei MS ‘Joachim’ of Hamburg. Acquired by Hans Bielken of Brake in 1975 she was renamed Atlantic Duke and in 1977 she was chartered to Prince Line as the Stuart Prince. She came off charter in 1979 and reverted to her original name until 1981 when she was sold to Rachel Trading & Investment Co. S. A. of Panama who renamed her Mare Pride. Chartered out in 1982 she was renamed Nedlloyd Pride for the duration, reverting to Mare Pride in 1983. In 1984 she was purchased by Reederei Eggers Schiffs K. G. of Panama without a change of name and in 1986 she was transferred to Pride Shipping A/S of Kristiansand, still retaining her name. Her owners changed her name to Sira Ocean in 1988 and in 1990 she became the Gimo Tellus when she was sold to Partenreederei Grotting og Aune of Norway. In 1992 she was renamed Resolute immediately prior to being sold to Marine Partner A/S of Nassau. Two year later she was acquired by Olga Shipping International Corp. of Panama, one of ten single ship companies managed by H. Glahr & Co. GmbH of Bremen, and renamed Olga 1. She is currently trading as the Olga 1 for the Tarron Sea Line Ltd of Lithuania.

HIGHLAND PRINCE (6) was built in 1972 by Santierul Naval Galatz at Galatz with a tonnage of 2943grt, a length of 348ft, a beam of 48ft 4in and a service speed of 14 knots. She was completed as the Pitria Sky for the Pitria Sky Navigation Co. of Pireaus and chartered to Prince Line as the Highland Prince in 1977. In the following year she reverted to her original name when she came off charter. She was sold to Pacific International Lines (Pte) of Singapore in 1980 when she was renamed Kota Angkasa. Ten years later, in 1990, she was acquired by Eagle King Shipping & trading Co. S.A. of Singapore who changed her name to Eagle King. She was sold again in 1992 to Hai Hong Maritime Co. of Panama when her name was changed to Hai Hong 3. On 11th June 1993 she sailed from Singapore to ride out an approaching typhoon and was never seen again.

CROWN PRINCE (3) was built in 1979 by Swan, Hunter (Shipbuilders) Ltd at Walker-on-Tyne with a tonnage of 1599grt, a length of 341ft 11in, a beam of 54ft 3in and a service speed of 15 knots. A container ship, she was launched for Prince Line on 16th October 1978 with Furness, Withy as managers. One of a pair she entered service in March 1979 and, with her sister, had a light blue waterline. In March 1980 she was taken over by C. Y. Tung and in 1983 transferred to Manchester Liners as the Manchester Crown. She was sold to Plenitrade Shipping Inc. of Monrovia in 1985 and renamed Thai Amber. Three years later she became the OOCL Advance of Orient Overseas Container Line Ltd of Hong Kong and in 1993 the HMM Advance of Benton Shipping Ltd with OOCL as managers. According to Shipwatch Directory 2001 she appears to be no longer trading.

ROYAL PRINCE (5) was built in 1979 by Swan, Hunter (Shipbuilders) Ltd at Walker-on-Tyne with a tonnage of 1599grt, a length of 341ft 11in, a beam of 54ft 3in and a service speed of 15 knots. Sister of the Crown Prince she was launched on 17th October 1978 and entered service in the following September. In March 1980 she was taken over by C. Y. Tung and in 1984 she was chartered to Ellerman Lines as the City of Oporto for the Ellerman-Prince service to the Mediterranean. Ten ships were involved operating a service every ten days, five sailing from Ellesmere Port and five sailing from Hull. She reverted to Royal Prince when she was replaced in 1985 and immediately sold to Gainset Shipping Inc. of Monrovia who renamed her Thai Jade. In 1989 she was sold to Orient Overseas Container Line Ltd of Hong Kong and her name was changed to OOCL Ambition. She was acquired by the Host Shipping Ltd of Panama, part of the Wah Tung Shipping Agency Co. of Hong Kong, in 1993 and renamed Host Ambition. According to Shipwatch Directory 2001 she appears to be no longer trading. (Photo: JK Byass)

J. GARDINER & CO./RIO-CAPE LINE LTD

ARISAIG was built in 1882 by Blackwood & Gordon (later to become Clyde Shipbuilders Co.) at Port Glasgow with a tonnage of 1328grt, a length of 240ft 4in, a beam of 33ft 1in and a service speed of 8 knots. She was completed for James Gardiner & Co. in May 1882. In 1895 she was sold to M & A Dall Orso fu G. of La Spezia and renamed Livietta. When replaced by a ship of the same name in 1899 she was sold to R. Meny & Cie of Antwerp who changed her name to Perseverance. She was acquired by Schultz & Cie of Antwerp 1903 and traded as the Maggie Schultz until July 1907 when she foundered.

LISMORE (1) was built in 1885 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1676grt, a length of 255ft, and a beam of 39ft. She was completed in September 1885 as a three masted sailing ship for James Gardiner & Co. and sold to James Cornfoot & Co. of Glasgow in 1890 with whom she served until May 1906 when she was wrecked.

MOIDART was built in 1878 by Edward Withy & Co. at West Hartlepool with a tonnage of 1360grt, a length of 243ft 8in, a beam of 32ft and a service speed of 9 knots. She was completed for James Gardiner & Co. in September 1878. She was sold to James Cormack & Co. of Leith in 1893 for their Leith – Baltic timber trade. On 9th June 1918 she was torpedoed by UC-77 seven miles off Lyme Regis.

MORVEN (1) was built in 1879 by Edward Withy & Co. at West Hartlepool with a tonnage of 1365grt, a length of 242ft 10in, a beam of 32ft and a service speed of 9 knots. She was completed for James Gardiner & Co. in December 1879. On 2nd May 1890, during a voyage from Sombrero to Stettin with phosphates she was wrecked on St. Kitts in the Caribbean.

GLENELG (1) was built in 1888 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2553grt, a length of 300ft, a beam of 40ft and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was completed in November 1888 for the Western Steam Ship Co. with James Gardiner & Co. as managers. When replaced in 1906 she was sold to Ido Yeizo of Yokohama who renamed her Yahiko Maru. In 1919 she was owned by Kobe Kisen Shinataku K. K. of Amagasaki and she was wrecked in June 1924.

LISMORE (2) was built in 1894 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3529grt, a length of 335ft, a beam of 43ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed in September 1894 for the Indian Steam Ship Co.. Sold to Dall’ Orso & Co. of La Spezia in 1912 she was renamed Colomba. By 1921 she was owned by Lloyd Mediterranean of Genoa with the same name and in 1923 she was broken up in Italy.

MORVEN (2) was built in 1894 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3502grt, a length of 344ft, a beam of 44ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed for the Indian Steam Ship Co. in October 1894 and sold to Itaya Shosen Kabusiki Kaisha of Nishinomiya who renamed her Inaho Maru in 1911. Eleven years later, in January 1922, she was wrecked.

ORWELL was built in 1897 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3789grt, a length of 354ft, a beam of 45ft and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed for the India Steam Ship Co. in August 1897 and sold to Akties Tonsbergs Hvalfangeri of Tonsberg for management by O. Hytton. By 1923 Hans Borge was listed as the manager and she was sold for scrap in 1927.

ORONSAY was built in 1900 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3761grt, a length of 354ft, a beam of 45ft and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Orwell she was completed for the Western Steam Ship Co. in September 1900. On 28th December 1916, during a voyage from Calcutta to Dundee, she was torpedoed by UC-22 forty eight miles south east of Malta. Her master was taken prisoner.

GLENLEE (1) was built in 1904 by Scotts Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 4140grt, a length of 377ft 1in, a beam of 49ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. She commenced trading for the Western Steam Ship Co. under the management of James Gardiner & Co. in November 1904. In 1915, whilst en-route from Barry to Aden with a cargo of coal, she was torpedoed by U-41 sixty seven miles south west of the Wolf Rock.

GLENLYON (1) was built in 1905 by Scotts Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 4149grt, a length of 377ft 1in, a beam of 49ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. She entered service for the Indian Steam Ship Co. with James Gardiner & Co. as managers in August 1905. On 31st March 1913, during a voyage from Delagoa to Karachi she was wrecked on Aldabra Island at the entrance to the Red Sea.

KINCRAIG was built in 1901 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3707grt, a length of 353ft 10in, a beam of 45ft and a service speed of 10 knots. She was built for the Steam Ship Kincraig Co. in November 1901. In 1917 she was sold to the Neptune Steam Navigation Co with Furness, Withy & Co. as managers and renamed Pentland Firth. On 4th September 1918, whilst en-route between Rosario and the Clyde with a cargo grain, she sprang a leak following an explosion which was attributed to sabotage and sank off the mouth of the River Plate.

KINTAIL was built in 1907 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3537grt, a length of 349ft 2in, a beam of 45ft and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Kincraig she was completed in December 1907 for James Gardiner & Co’s Steam Ship Kincraig Co. Ltd. She was acquired by the Neptune Steam Navigation Co. in 1917 and placed under the management of Furness, Withy & Co. with the name Alpine Range. She was sold to B. Buskos of Hydra in 1924 and renamed Akropolis. In the following year she was acquired by Cie. Dens-Ocean Soc. Anon of Antwerp who changed her name to Comte de Flandre. She was broken up at Hendrik ido Ambacht in Holland during 1936.

GLENELG (2)/NORMAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1904 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4160grt, a length of 376ft 10in, a beam of 49ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed for James Gardiner & Co’s Western Steam Ship Co. in November 1904. In 1917 she was acquired with the company by Furness, Withy & Co., their oldest ship, and transferred to the new Rio Cape Line Ltd. She was renamed Norman Prince by the Rio Cape Line in January 1919 but continued to be managed by Furness, Withy & Co. In 1922 she was renamed Constantinos Coutsodontis when she was sold to Coutsodontis & Papanastasopoulo of Syra and broken up in Italy during 1922.

GLENDHU/STUART PRINCE (3) was built in 1905 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4129grt, a length of 376ft 11in, a beam of 49ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Norman Prince she was delivered to James Gardiner & Co. as the Glendhu in December 1905. Acquired by Furness, Withy & Co. in 1917 she was renamed Stuart Prince by the Rio Cape Line Ltd in 1919. In 1922 she was transferred to Prince Line Ltd and in December 1935 was sold for scrap at Hull and subsequently broken up at Danzig.

GLENAFFRIC/SAXON PRINCE (3) was built in 1905 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4144grt, a length of 376ft 11in, a beam of 49ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Norman Prince she was completed in March 1905 as the Glenaffric for James Gardiner & Co. Acquired by Furness, Withy & Co. in 1917 she was renamed Saxon Prince by the Rio Cape Line Ltd in 1919. In 1922 management of the ship was transferred to Prince Line Ltd. She was sold to A/b Naxos of Helsingborg in 1924, renamed Naxos and placed under management of R. Mattson. In 1936 she was acquired by Ignazio Messina & Co. of Genoa and with the name Ogaden was rebuilt to carry passengers to Italian East Africa. On 27th October 1941 she was taken over by the Italian Government and on 12th August 1942 was torpedoed by HMS Porpoise near Ras el Tin in the Red Sea.

GLENDEVON/SAILOR PRINCE (3) was built in 1907 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4169grt, a length of 377ft, a beam of 49ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Norman Prince she was completed in November 1907 as the Glendevon for James Gardiner & Co. and taken over by Furness, Withy & Co. in 1917. During that year she carried the Vickers aircraft in which Allcock & Brown made the first transatlantic flight to Newfoundland. She was renamed Sailor Prince in 1919, placed under the management of Prince Line in 1922 and broken up at Rosyth in March 1936. (Photo: World Ship Society)

GLENSHEIL/HIGHLAND PRINCE (4) was built in 1909 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4798grt, a length of 400ft, a beam of 52ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed as the Glensheil for James Gardiner & Co. in August 1909 and acquired by Furness, Withy & Co. with the rest of the fleet in 1917. Renamed Highland Prince by the Rio Cape Line Ltd in 1919 she was placed under the management of Prince Ltd in 1922. In January 1938 she was sold to P. Lyras of Athens, renamed Orion and, as his only ship, was managed by A. Lusi. On 20th September 1948, during a voyage from Sydney, Cape Breton Island to Botwood with timber, she caught fire after an explosion in the engine room and drifted ashore on Belle Island where she became a total loss. (Photo: A Duncan)

CLENCLUNY was built in 1909 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4812grt, a length of 400ft, a beam of 52ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Highland Prince she was build for James Gardiner & Co’s Western Steam Ship Co. However she never saw service with Furness, Withy or Prince Line as on 27th April 1917, during a voyage from Bombay to Hull, she was torpedoed by UC-67 off Cape Sigli in the Mediterranean with the loss of 4 lives.

GLENORCHY was built in 1909 by Scotts Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4737grt, a length of 400ft, a beam of 52ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Highland Prince she was completed as the Glenorchy for James Gardiner & Co. and taken over by Furness, Withy & Co. in 1917. On 1st March 1920 she stranded on Victoria Bar during a voyage from New York to Victoria, Brazil and was declared a total loss.

GLENETIVE/OCEAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1911 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 5212grt, a length of 410ft 4in, a beam of 52ft 4in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed as the Glenetive for James Gardiner & Co. in September 1911and acquired by Furness, Withy & Co. in 1917. Renamed Ocean Prince in 1919 by the Rio Cape Line, management was transferred to Prince Line Ltd in 1922. She was sold to S. Costanos & Son of Pireaus in 1935 when her name was changed to Germaine. on 15th December 1939 she was torpedoed by U-48 south west of Cape Clear. (Photo: Hildebrand)

GLENSPEAN/WELSH PRINCE (3) was built in 1912 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 5221grt, a length of 410ft 2in, a beam of 52ft 4in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Ocean Prince she was completed as the Glenspean for James Gardiner & Co. in January 1912 and acquired by Furness, Withy & Co. in 1917. Renamed Welsh Prince in 1919 by the Rio Cape Line, management was transferred to Prince Line Ltd in 1922. On 28th May 1922, during a voyage from Astoria to Japan she sunk with the loss of 7 lives after being in collision with America – Hawaiian’s Iowan in the Columbia River.

GLENARTNEY was built in 1911 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 5210grt, a length of 410ft 4in, a beam of 52ft 4in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed for the Caledonian Steam Ship Co. Ltd with James Gardiner as manager. On 18th March 1915, during a voyage from Bangkok to the UK, she was torpedoed by U-34 four miles south of the Sovereign Lightship in the English Channel with the loss of 1 life.

GLENNEVIS/AFRICAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1917 by Ayrshire Dockyard Co. at Irvine with a tonnage of 5119grt, a length of 400ft 8in, a beam of 53ft 5in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was delivered as the Glennevis in May 1917 and taken over by Furness, Withy & Co. with the rest of the fleet for operation by Rio Cape Line Ltd. Renamed African Prince in 1919 by the Rio Cape Line, management was transferred to Prince Line in 1922. She was sold to Counties Ship Management Ltd for operation by the Dorset Steamship Co in 1936.and renamed Pentridge Hill. When World War 2 was declared in 1939 she was purchased by the Board of Trade, with a number of other vessels, as a reserve ship and given the BOT name, Botway. In December 1945 she was loaded in Scotland with surplus shells and ammunition and scuttled in deep waters in the Atlantic. (Photo: A Duncan)

GLENCARRON was built in 1917 by Ayrshire Dockyard Co. at Irvine with a tonnage of 5117grt, a length of 400ft 7in, a beam of 53ft 5in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the African Prince she was delivered as the Glencarron in June 1917 and taken over by Furness, Withy & Co. On 19th February 1918, during a voyage from Philadelphia to London, she was torpedoed by U-82 in the English Channel 47 miles off the Lizard.

GLENLYON (2)/INDIAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1917 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4933grt, a length of 400ft 4in, a beam of 53ft 5in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the African Prince she was completed as the Glenlyon for James Gardiner & Co. in September 1917 and acquired by Furness, Withy & Co.with the rest of the fleet. Renamed Indian Prince in 1919 by the Rio Cape Line, management was transferred to Prince Line Ltd in 1922. In April 1934 she was damaged following a grounding outside Cape Town. In 1936 she was sold to A. I. Cosmas of Panama and renamed Andreas. She was seized by the Japanese in December 1941, when in the Dutch East Indies, renamed Wakatu Maru and placed under the management of Kisen Kabusiki Kaisya of Kobe. On 16th December 1942 she was sunk off East Timor by Dutch aircraft from Darwin. (Photo: FW Hawks)

GLENLEE (2) was built in 1917 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4915grt, a length of 400ft 8in, a beam of 53ft 5in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the African Prince she was completed in October 1917 as the Glenlee for the Rio Cape Line Ltd with Furness, Withy & Co. as managers. On 25th June 1918 she escaped from a gunfire attack from a surfaced U-boat but on the following 9th September, during a voyage from the Clyde to Dunkirk, she was torpedoed by UB-57 4 miles off the Owers Lightship in the English Channel with the loss of one life.

CORSICAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1921 by Furness Shipbuilding Co. at Haverton Hill with a tonnage of 3493grt, a length of 363ft 4in, a beam of 52ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. She was completed in December 1921 as the Persiana for Furness, Withy & Co. and in the following year was transferred to the Warren Line of Liverpool and renamed Chickahominy. In 1924 she was transferred to Rio Cape Line Ltd when her name was changed to Corsican Prince. After fourteen years service she was sold in 1938 to Les Cargoes Algeriens Soc. Anon of Algiers who changed her name to Jean et Jacques. When France capitulated in 1940 she was at Algiers and later worked under German control. On 3rd March 1942 she was torpedoed by a British MTBs off Cape Blanc, Bizerta.

SARDINIAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1922 by Furness Shipbuilding Co. at Haverton Hill with a tonnage of 3491grt, a length of 363ft 4in, a beam of 52ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Corsican Prince she was launched in March 1922 as the Egyptiana for Furness, Withy & Co. and completed as the Appomattox for the Warren Line of Liverpool. She was transferred to Rio Cape Line Ltd in 1924 and renamed Sardinian Prince. On 16th March 1941she was part of a convoy which had been ordered to disperse when the German battle cruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau appeared on the scene. The two battle cruisers sank or captured no fewer than sixteen of the unprotected ships and the Sardinian Prince was sunk by the Scharnhorst 500 miles south east of Cape Race. Surviving ships managed to transmit the ‘RRR’ raider warnings and the battle cruisers fled to the safety of Brest in accordance with German policy to minimise fleet losses. On the following day HMS Rodney picked up the survivors. (Photo: A Duncan)

CASTILIAN PRINCE (2)/SICILIAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1922 by Furness Shipbuilding Co. at Haverton Hill with a tonnage of 3489grt, a length of 363ft 4in, a beam of 52ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Corsican Prince she was laid down as the Arabiana for Furness, Withy & Co. and completed in June 1922 as the Alleghany for the Warren Line of Liverpool. In 1923 she was transferred to Rio Cape Line Ltd and renamed Castilian Prince. Her name was changed to Sicilian Prince in 1926 when she was transferred to Prince Line’s Mediterranean services. She was sold to Cie. des Bateaux a Vapeurs ‘Nord’ of Dunkirk who renamed her Alsacien. In 1952 she was acquired by Malic Yolac of Istanbul who changed her name to Yolac. On 11th November 1963 she arrived at Kalafatyea where she was broken up.

JAVANESE PRINCE (1) was built in 1926 by Deutsches Werft A. G. at Hamburg with a tonnage of 6734grt, a length of 441ft 7in, a beam of 60ft 4in and a service speed of 14 knots. Built to the same specification as the Siamese Prince she entered service in January 1926. On 21st May 1941, during a voyage from Cardiff to New York via the north of Ireland, she was torpedoed by U-138 two hundred miles northwest of the Butt of Lewis. (Photo: John Clarkson Collection)

MALAYAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1926 by Deutsches Werft A. G. at Hamburg with a tonnage of 6734grt, a length of 441ft 7in, a beam of 60ft 4in and a service speed of 14 knots. Sister of the Javanese Prince she was completed in March 1926. The only one of her class to survive the Second World War she was broken up at Inverkeithing by Thos. W. Ward in July 1950.
ASIATIC PRINCE (3) was built in 1926 by Deutsches Werft A. G. at Hamburg with a tonnage of 6734grt, a length of 441ft 7in, a beam of 60ft 4in and a service speed of 14 knots. Sister of the Javanese Prince she was completed in April 1926. On 16th March 1928 she sailed from San Pedro, Los Angeles for Yokohama with silver bullion valued at £263,000 and a cargo worth £180,000. Six days later she radioed from a position 1,890 miles from Los Angeles that, because of the weather, she had reduced speed. On 24th March Ellerman’s City of Eastbourne picked up a faint SOS in hurricane weather 200 miles north west of Hawaii. The Asiatic Prince vanished without further trace with the loss of 48 lives. Mysteriously the City of Eastbourne picked up a second SOS but from a call sign P— instead of R—. This possibly indicated the presence of a second ship but as no other vessels were reported missing it is assumed that the Asiatic Prince made an error in her final transmission.

JAPANESE PRINCE (2)/INDIAN PRINCE (4) was built in 1926 by Deutsches Werft A. G. at Hamburg with a tonnage of 6734grt, a length of 441ft 7in, a beam of 60ft 4in and a service speed of 14 knots. Sister of the Javanese Prince she was delivered in May 1926. In 1937 negotiations were commenced to sell her to Butler Wang’s Rederei A/S for management by W. Butler Wang as the Wave but they were never completed. She reverted to Prince Line Ltd as the Indian Prince in 1938. On 3rd September 1943 Italy surrendered and in the following November the Mediterranean was opened to escorted Allied merchantmen. Two months later, on 11th November, during a voyage from Liverpool to Bombay, she was hit by an aerial torpedo dropped by the Luftwaffe 25 miles northwest of Bone, Tunisia. She was taken in tow but later sank.

CHINESE PRINCE (3) was built in 1926 by Deutsches Werft A. G. at Hamburg with a tonnage of 6734grt, a length of 441ft 7in, a beam of 60ft 4in and a service speed of 14 knots. Sister of the Javanese Prince she entered service in June 1926. On 12th June 1941 she was torpedoed by U-552 two hundred and eighty miles north west of Malin Head. (Photo: A Duncan)

CINGALESE PRINCE (1) was built in 1929 by Blythswood Shipbuilding Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 6625grt, a length of 441ft 6in, a beam of 60ft 4in and a service speed of 14 knots. Sister of the Javanese Prince she was completed in July 1929. In April 1941, during the Greek campaign, she was bombed and badly damaged when off Piraeus. Later in the same year, on 20th September, she was torpedoed and sunk by U-111 southwest of Freetown.

BRITISH PRINCE (4) was built in 1935 by Wm. Doxford & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4979grt, a length of 412ft 2in, a beam of 54ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed in January 1935as the Sutherland for B. J. Sutherland of Newcastle, one of a series of economy engined ships from Doxford’s. The economy came about by giving the ships a wider beam, which provided more cargo space, and a slow running engine. Acquired by Furness, Withy & Co. for Rio Cape Line Ltd with Prince Line as managers in 1936 she was renamed British Prince. On 26th September 1941 she was sunk by German bombers off Hornsea as she was approaching the Thames estuary. (Photo: FW Hawks)

SCOTTISH PRINCE (3) was built in 1938 by Blythswood Shipbuilding Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4917grt, a length of 431ft 6in, a beam of 56ft and a service speed of 10 knots. Another economy style ship she was delivered in May 1938. On 17th March 1942 she was torpedoed by U-68 off Cape Palmas in Liberia.

JAVANESE PRINCE (2) was built in 1944 by Blythswood Shipbuilding Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 8879grt, a length of 482ft 4in, a beam of 62ft 1in and a service speed of 15 knots. She was completed in November 1944 for Rio Cape Line Ltd with Furness, Withy & Co. as managers and transferred to Prince Line Ltd in 1954. In 1961 she was sold to Wm. Thomson’s Ben Line and renamed Benlarig. On 6th September 1969 she arrived at Hong Kong where she was broken up by the Leung Yau Shipbreaking Co. (Photo: Mersey Photos)

WELSH PRINCE (6) was built in 1944 by Wm. Doxford & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 7381grt, a length of 444ft 10in, a beam of 56ft 6in and a service speed of 11.5 knots. She was a standard ‘C’ type vessel completed in Sept 1944 for Rio Cape Line with Furness Withy as Managers and transferred to Furness Withy ownership in 1954. She was sold to Vergocean Steam Ship Co. of London in 1961 and renamed Vergmont. On 23rd February 1971 she arrived at Whampoa where she was broken up.

EMPIRE REGENT/BLACK PRINCE (3) was built in 1943 by Furness Shipbuilding Co. at Haverton Hill with a tonnage of 9904grt, a length of 497ft 6in, a beam of 64ft 5in and a service speed of 15 knots. The second ship of twelve ‘Fast’ standards she was launched on 17th July 1943 as the Empire Regent for the Ministry of War Transport. When she was completed and delivered on 25th November she was placed under the management of T & J Brocklebank. In 1945 management was transferred to Furness, Withy & Co. and she was allocated to Rio Cape Line Ltd. On 13th August 1946 she was acquired by Rio Cape Line Ltd and renamed Black Prince. Three years later, on 19th May 1949, she was transferred to Shaw, Saville & Albion who renamed her Zealandic. She was sold on 3rd October 1952 to Canadian Pacific Steamships of Liverpool who renamed her Beaverlodge and on 16th March 1960 to Wm. Thomson’s Ben Line who changed her name to Benhiant. On 15th April 1970 she was acquired by Witty Cia. Naviera S. A. of Limassol, renamed Venus and on 14th July 1971 arrived at Koahsuing in Taiwan where she was broken up by Chuang Kuo Steel & Iron Works. (Photo: World Ship Society)

MALAYAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1945 by Bethlehem Fairfield Shipyard at Baltimore with a tonnage of 7698grt, a length of 455ft 2in, a beam of 62ft 1in and a service speed of 14 knots. She was completed for the US War Shipping Administration as the Tusculum Victory and bare boat chartered to the Ministry of War Transport with Furness, Withy & Co. as managers. As such she was one of 97 ships converted into troopships for 1,547 men. In 1947 she was acquired by Furness & Withy & Co. from the Ministry of Transport and renamed Pacific Stronghold. Transferred to Rio Cape Line Ltd in 1954 she was renamed Malayan Prince but remained under Furness, Withy ownership. In 1959 she was sold to Marine Bulk Carriers Inc. of New York who changed her name first to Wang Knight and then to Marine Carrier. In the following year she was purchased by the Elie Shipping Corp. of New York who renamed her Elie V and four year later she became the Oceanic Wave when she was acquired by the Oceanic Pioneer Steam Ship Co. of Cleveland, Ohio. Her last owner was the Oswego Shipping Co. Inc of Cleveland who named her Silver Falcon in 1969 and in February of the following year she was broken up at Kaohsuing in Taiwan. (Photo: A Duncan)

BRITISH PRINCE (5) was built in 1945 by Bethlehem Fairfield Shipyard at Baltimore with a tonnage of 7681grt, a length of 455ft 2in, a beam of 62ft 1in and a service speed of 14 knots. Sister of the Malayan Prince she was completed as the Stamford Victory for the US War Shipping Administration. Built as a troopship she was bareboat chartered to the Ministry of Transport in 1946 and placed under the management of Furness, Withy & Co. In 1948 she was acquired by Prince Line Ltd and renamed British Prince for operation by Rio Cape Line Ltd. She was transferred to Furness, Withy & Co. in 1954 and in 1957 was chartered to T & J Brocklebank for a two year period as the Mandagala. In 1960 she was sold Orient Mid-East Great Lake Services Inc. of Piraeus and renamed Orient Trader. On 21st July she caught fire whilst discharging a cargo of rubber at Toronto and was towed out and beached on Ward Island. Total gutted she was sold for scrap and on 7th July 1966 arrived at Valencia in tow of Praia da Adragal.

The company history has been extracted from –
“Pride of the Princes” by Norman Middlemiss
The ship histories have been taken from –
Merchant Fleets-Manchester Liners, Houlders, Alexander, Prince & Rio Cape Lines by Duncan Haws