History of the Merchant Navy
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POTOSI (3) was built in 1905 by W. Pickersgill & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4375grt, a length of 381ft 5in, a beam of 49ft and a service speed of 12 knots. She was built for the general cargo service and in 1914 was the first British ship to transit the newly opened Panama Canal. In 1925 she was sold to N. Kulukundis of Syra, Greece and renamed Georgios M. Her owners were E. G. Culucundis and S.C. Costomeni of Syra in 1927 and in 1929 she was acquired by S. G. Lyras and M. G. Lemos. On 9th November 1931 during a voyage from Varna to Antwerp with grain her cargo shifted during a storm. PLM 22 managed to rescue 5 men but was then driven off. The Georgios M was never seen again and 18 crew members lost their lives.

DUENDES was built in 1906 by Sir James Laing & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4602grt, a length of 381ft 5in, a beam of 49ft and a service speed of 12 knots. She was the first of a class of four cargo ships built to a similar specification to that of the Potosi. During the First World War she was requisitioned as a munitions transport. On 25th March 1925 she was shelled by a U-boat when 70 miles west of the Scilly Isles but survived the attack. In 1927 she was sold to G. Lykiardopulo of Greece and renamed Zachariosa. After a further five years service she was broken up in 1932.

ESMERALDAS was built in 1906 by Sir James Laing & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4491grt, a length of 381ft 5in, a beam of 49ft and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Duendes she joined the cargo service in 1906. In 1916 she transported 600 mules from Buenos Aires to Mombasa for use during the East African campaign. She was captured and sunk by the German Armed Merchant Cruiser Möewe in 1917.

BOGOTA (2) was built in 1906 by Sir James Laing & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4603grt, a length of 390ft, a beam of 50ft and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Duendes she joined the cargo service in 1906. On 10th November 1916 she was torpedoed and sunk in the North Atlantic.

FLAMENCO (1) was built in 1906 by Sir James Laing & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4540grt, a length of 381ft 5in, a beam of 49ft and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Duendes she joined the cargo services in 1906. On 6th February 1916 she was stopped by the German Armed Merchant Cruiser Möewe when 310 miles north west of Pernambuco and sunk with a time bomb with the loss of 1 life.

ORTEGA (1) was built in 1906 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 7970grt, a length of 465ft 4in, a beam of 56ft 4in and a service speed of 15.5 knots. Launched on 22nd March 1906 she commenced her maiden voyage to Callao on 19th July and introduced to the route the Bibby tandem cabin whereby all passengers had a porthole. When the First World War was declared on 4th August 1914 she was at Montevideo en route to Callao under the command of Capt. Douglas Kinnier. On 16th September she sailed from Valpariaso, bound for Liverpool, and was immediately chased by the German cruiser Dresden. When she was ordered to stop on 19th September the master took the Ortega into the uncharted Nelson Strait near Cape Horn. While the Dresden waited for her to re-appear the liner, led by two lifeboats taking soundings, traversed 100 miles via the landward side of the Queen Adelaide Archipeligo, the Smyth Channel and the Straits of Magellan where she was met by the Chilean warship Admiral Lynch which was searching for survivors. In 1918 she was used to Transport American troops to France and in the following year, on 31st January 1919, made the first voyage through the Panama Canal to Valparaiso. She reverted to the southern route to Chile on 4th December 1924 and in 1927 was sold for £19,500 prior to be broken up at Briton Ferry.

ORIANA was built in 1906 by Barclay Curle & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 8086grt, a length of 465ft 4in, a beam of 56ft 4in and a service speed of 15.5 knots. Sister of the Ortega she was launched on 26th April 1906 and commenced her maiden voyage to Callao via Cape Horn on 21st June. During the First World War she was requisitioned by the Government for use mainly as a troopship. On 8th May 1918 whilst in convoy she went aground in dense fog on Torcor Head by Rathlin Island, off Northern Island. When the fog lifted it became apparent that the escorting destroyers Martial and Nicator were also aground as were Blue Star’s Aeneas and British India’s Manora but fortunately on shelving rocks. All the ships were refloated within two weeks. She resumed commercial service on 17th October 1919 and in November 1922 was transferred to the Panama Canal route. She was eventually broken up in 1927.

ORONSA was built in 1906 by Harland & Wolff Ltd (Yard No. 377) at Belfast with a tonnage of 7989grt, a length of 465ft 4in, a beam of 56ft 4in and a service speed of 15.5 knots. The second sister of the Ortega she was launched on 26th May 1906 and entered service on 13th September with an additional call at Pernambuco. On 28th April 1918, a bright moonlit night, she was torpedoed off Bardsey Island, North Wales whilst travelling in convoy. Her boilers exploded and the ship sank with the loss of 3 lives.

CALLAO (2) was built in 1885 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 4206grt, a length of 420ft 4in, a beam of 42ft 5in and a service speed of 14 knots. She was launched 0n 28th February 1885 as the Gaelic for operation in the Pacific by the White Star Line. Her maiden voyage started on 18th July from Liverpool to New York from where she sailed to San Francisco on a charter to Occidental & Oriental Steamship Co. of San Francisco. She made her first voyage from San Francisco on 10th November to Yokohama and Hong Kong. Her final sailing from San Francisco commenced on 13th December 1904 and in March of the following year she was sold to PSNC and renamed Callao. Employed on the Pacific coast route on a temporary basis pending the arrival of the Quillota she was broken up at Briton Ferry , South Wales in September 1907.

HUANCHACO was built in 1907 by W Beardmore & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4524grt, a length of 390ft 7in, a beam of 50ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was built for the cargo service and joined the fleet in August 1907. In August 1914 she was requisitioned by the government and used mainly to transport horses and stores. She returned to PSNC in 1919 and remained for a further 6 years before being sold to unknown buyers and renamed Frank Sutton. In 1926 she was sold to Aktiebolaget Bore of Abo in Finland and renamed Bore VIII. After a further three years service she was broken up in 1929.

JUNIN was built in 1907 by W Beardmore & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4536grt, a length of 391ft 6in, a beam of 50ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She joined the cargo fleet in September 1907 where she remained until 1926 when she was sold to William Thomas Shipping Co. of Liverpool and renamed Cambrian Idylle. After a further three years service she was broken up.

KENUTA (1) was built in 1907 by John Brown & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4953grt, a length of 401ft 4in, a beam of 52ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. In addition to passenger accommodation she was fitted with dormitories fore and aft capable of holding 693 emigrants. She entered service in October 1907 and remained until 1926 when she was sold to Pandelis Bros. and renamed Vasilios Pandelis. By 1930 she was being managed Constants (South Wales ) Ltd of Cardiff and in 1933 she was broken up in Italy.

LIMA (3) was built in 1907 by John Brown & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4946grt, a length of 401ft 4in, a beam of 52ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Kenuta she was delivered in December 1907. On 10th February she was wrecked on Huamblin Island in the Straits of Magellan during a severe storm. The Hatumet, owned by Hathor Steam Ship Co. of London and commanded by Capt. Percy Jacob, stood bay and rescued 188 passenger and 17 crew members. Six lives were lost during that operation when a lifeboat capsized. The Hatumet, which was severely overloaded, steamed into Ancud and the Chilean cruiser Blanca Encalada raced back to the scene of the accident and took off the remaining 88 survivors.

QUILLOTA was built in 1907 by W Beardmore & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3674grt, a length of 361ft 5in, a beam of 46ft 2in and a service speed of 14 knots. She was built for the Valparaiso to Callao service. In 1915 she was chartered to Royal Mail Lines to replace the Berbice which had been requisitioned for war service. She was transferred to the New York – Panama Canal – Guayaquil in 1921 and in 1923 she was sold to Soc. Anon. Maritima Chilena and renamed Chile. During the same year she was rebuilt with raised lifeboats and the superstructure increases to resemble the Peru. In 1928 she was joined by the Peru on the Chilean coastal routes a sported a yellow funnel with a black top and broad black band. By 1931 she was no longer operating.

QUILPUE was built in 1907 by W Beardmore & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3669grt, a length of 361ft 5in, a beam of 46ft 2in and a service speed of 14 knots. Sister of the Quillota she was built for the Valparaiso – Callao route and entered service in May 1907. In 1915 she was chartered to Royal Mail Lines to replace the Balantia which had been requisitioned for war service. On 12th June 1917 she was attacked by a surfaced U-boat but managed to drive her off with an accurate counter attack. In 1921 she was transferred to the New York – Panama Canal – Guayaquil service where she remained until the following year when she was sold to West Australian Steam Navigation Co. and renamed Gascoyne under the management of Bethell Gwyn & Co. of Liverpool. After a further eight years service she was broken up in 1930.

EXPLORER was built in 1873 at Liverpool with a tonnage of 2066grt, a length of 300ft 4in, a beam of 34ft 8in and a service speed of 9 knots. She was built as the Crocus and renamed Explorer by T & J Harrison. Acquired by PSNC in 1907 she was the last iron hulled ship to join the fleet. She was converted into a hulk in 1914.

ORCOMA (1) was built in 1908 by W Beardmore & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 11546grt, a length of 511ft 7in, a beam of 62ft 2in and a service speed of 14.5 knots. Launched on 2nd April 1908 she commenced her maiden voyage from Liverpool to the west coast of South America via the Straits of Magellan on 27th August and was the largest and fastest vessel on the South American Pacific route. In 1909 she took the first conducted tour to South America for Thomas Cook at a cost of £300 per person. She broke the Liverpool to Callao record, which included ports of call, in 1914 when she completed the voyage in 32 days 22 hour 40 mins. In the October she returned to the UK in a faster time and missed the holocaust of the German victory at Coronel by a few hours. She was converted into an Armed Merchant Cruiser in March 1915 and served on the Northern patrol with the 10th Cruiser Squadron. On 7th November 1919 she was returned to PSNC and her first commercial voyage was back to the UK via the Panama Canal and New York. She was modernised and converted to burn oil in 1923. In 1933 she was replaced by the Reina del Pacifico and realised £14580 when she was sold for scrap and broken up by Hughes Bolckow at Blyth in June of the same year.

PONDEROSO was built in 1911 by H & C Grayson at Liverpool with a tonnage of 285grt, a length of 115ft 4in, a beam of 25ft 1in and a service speed of 9 knots. She was a tug and served a various South American stations. At the time the Buenos Aires & Pacific Railway Co. operated a tug with the same name and which attended PSNC ships at Buenos Aires which caused a lot of confusion. She was sold to Chile during 1938/39 and her subsequent disposal is unknown.

ANDES (1) was built in 1913 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 15620grt, a length of 570ft, a beam of 67ft 3in and a service speed of 17 knots. Laid down for PSNC she was transferred to Royal Mail and launched on 8th May 1913. However, she commenced her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Valparaiso for PSNC on 26th May before joining the Southampton to River Plate service for Royal Mail. In April 1915 she was converted into an Armed Merchant Cruiser. On 29th February 1916, with her sister the Alcantara, she engaged the German raider Greif which was masquerading as the Norwegian ship, Rena. Both the Alcantara and the Grief were sunk and the Andes picked up the survivors including 115 Germans. During 1917 she was initially deployed in the Atlantic with convoys before repatriating submarine crews, who had been trapped by the Russian Revolution, from Murmansk. After the war she returned to commercial service and after a refit at Belfast during January 1919 resumed the River Plate run. In 1929 she was converted into a cruise liner at the Gladstone Dock in Liverpool and renamed Atlantis. She was present at the Spithead Review which was part of King George V’s Silver Jubilee celebrations in 1935. In August 1939, when she was at Danzig during a cruise, she was recalled to Southampton where she arrived on 25th August and was converted into hospital ship No.33 with 400 beds. With 130 medical staff she was initially based at Alexandria. In April 1940 she returned to Norwegian waters to assist with the evacuation during which time she was bombed twice. Later in the same year she moved to the Indian Ocean where she remained for two years. In 1942 she was based at Diego Suarez and took part in the Madagasgar operation. During 1943 she was used to repatriate prisoners of war including the transportation of Italians to Lisbon and Germans to Gothenburg. Between 1944 and 1946 she was used as a hospital ship and for repatriation duties during which time she steamed some 280,000 miles and carried 35,000 wounded servicemen. In 1948 she was chartered for 4 years to carry emigrants from Southampton to Australia and New Zealand. On completion of the charter in 1952 she was laid up in the Clyde prior to being sold for scrapping at Faslane.

CALBUCO was built in 1913 by Lytham Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. at Lytham, Lancashire with a tonnage of 55grt, a length of 62ft 2in, a beam of 15ft 1in and a service speed of 9 knots. She was a steam tug built to tow the barges used to replenish the coal hulks and was subsequently sold in 1925.

ORMEDA/ORDUNA (1) was built in 1914 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 15507grt, a length of 570ft, a beam of 67ft 4in and a service speed of 15 knots. She was laid down with the intention of being named Ormeda but was launched on 2nd October 1913 as the Orduna. She commenced her maiden voyage to Valparaiso on 19th February 1914 and in the following October was chartered to Cunard for their Liverpool to New York service, standing in for vessels requisitioned for trooping. On 28th June 1915 she was chased by a U-boat but managed to outrun her attacker some 20 miles from the Smalls. Twelve days later , on 9th July, she was missed by a torpedo when 30 miles south of Queenstown in Southern Ireland. During December 1915, she carried Canadian troops from Canada to England. In June 1918 she sank a German submarine by gunfire and on 1st December of the same year was in collision with and sank Elder Dempster’s Konakry off Galley Head, Ireland. She returned to PSNC on 31st December 1919 and resumed service to Montevideo on 1st April 1920. In 1921 she was transferred to Royal Mail’s Hamburg – Southampton – New York service, to cater for a lack of German berths, making her first sailing on 28th May. In the autumn of 1922 she returned to her builders for a refit and resumed the South American service on 1st January 1923. Converted to oil in 1926 she reverted to PSNC ownership on 7th April 1927, operating the Panama route. In 1941 she was requisitioned as a troopship and continued in that role until November 1950 when she was decommissioned and laid up. She was broken up at Dalmuir in 1951 after 37 years of exemplary service.

ORBITA (1) was built in 1914 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 15495grt, a length of 570ft, a beam of 67ft 4in and a service speed of 15 knots. Sister of the Orduna she was launched on 7th July 1914 and entered service in 1915 as an auxiliary cruiser and also as a short crossing troopship. In March 1919 she was completed as a commercial vessel and commenced her southbound maiden voyage on 26th September. On 30th April 1921 she was chartered to Royal Mail Lines for deployment on their Hamburg – Southampton – New York service and two years later, together with her sister, was transferred to Royal Mail ownership. Three years later and after being converted to oil burning she returned to PSNC and on 4th November 1926 resumed the Liverpool – Panama Canal – Callao – Valparaiso service. In 1941 she was requisitioned for troopship duties for the duration of the Second World War and in 1946 was used to carry emigrants to Australia and New Zealand. She was broken up by Thos. W. Ward at Newport, Monmouthshire in 1950.

JAMAICA was built in 1908 by W Harkness & Son at Middlesbrough with a tonnage of 1138grt, a length of 220ft, a beam of 34ft and a service speed of 11 knots. She was launched on 11th August 1908 for Elder Line Ltd and completed as a passenger feeder for the Caribbean operating out of Kingston, Jamaica, connecting with the Imperial Direct West India services. In 1911 she was laid up at Kingston when the service was discontinued. She was sold to the Royal Mail Steam Packet Co. in 1912 for use on their Central America services out of Colon and transferred to PSNC in 1914. During 1915 she was requisitioned for Government service locally. In 1918 ownership was shown to be Royal Mail but she continued to operate for PSNC. She was sold to Soc. Industrial del Aysen of Valparaiso in 1929 for their Valparaiso – Punta Arenas ports and renamed Coyhaique. After a further fourteen years service she was broken up locally.

ACAJUTLA was built in 1911 by Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson at Wallsend with a tonnage of 1170grt, a length of 215ft 8in, a beam of 33ft 6in and a service speed of 11 knots. She was built for the Salvador Railway Company of London and acquired by PSNC, together with the Salvador, in 1915 for their Central American services operating a fortnightly service through the Panama Canal. During the 1920’s she was rebuilt and modernised. She was sold to Pandelis Line of Greece in 1946, renamed Marathon, and operated by Neil and Pandelis of London on a Greek Island service.

SALVADOR was built in 1909 by Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson at Wallsend with a tonnage of 1128grt, a length of 215ft 8in, a beam of 33ft 6in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Acajutla she was built for the Salvador Railway Company of London and acquired by PSNC in 1915 for their Central America services. Like her sister she was rebuilt and modernised during the 1920’s. She was sold to Pandelis Line of Greece for operation by Neil & Pandelis of London on their Greek Island service and renamed Salamis. At the time of her sale the Salvador had transited the Panama Canal on 779 occasions; the greatest number by any commercial ship. The Panama Canal Co. recognised the achievement by issuing a certificate of honour. The Acajutla also received one.

CAUCA was built in 1915 by Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson at Wallsend with a tonnage of 1448grt, a length of 226ft, a beam of 35ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. She entered service in 1915 and was based at Panama. Sold in 1923 she was renamed Tonkin by Indo-Chinoise de Navigation of Haiphong in Indo-China. She was sold on again during the 1930’s and all trace of her was lost.

LAUTARO was built in 1915 by Harland & Wolff at Glasgow with a tonnage of 6240grt, a length of 399ft 1in, a beam of 52ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. Completed in 1915 she was built as the Bostonian for Leyland Line and sold to Glen Line in the following year and renamed Glengyle. On 10th June 1917 she was chased by a submarine in the Mediterranean and escaped after returning gunfire. She became the Lautaro in 1923 when she was acquired by PSNC. In 1947 she was sold to Jenny Steam Ship Co. of London and renamed River Swift. In the following year she caught fire at Rio de Janeiro and was damaged beyond repair resulting in her being broken up in South America during 1949.

ORCA was built in 1918 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 15120grt, a length of 574ft, a beam of 67ft 4in and a service speed of 15 knots. She was launched on 15th January 1918 and completed as a cargo ship but returned to the builder’s yard on 18th February 1921 where she was remodelled as per her design as a passenger liner. Her maiden voyage from Southampton to New York via Hamburg on 18th December 1922. She was transferred to Royal Mail Line ownership in 1923 and sold to White Star Line in January 1927 and was renamed Calgaric. In 1931 she was laid up at Milford Haven and during the year made just one voyage to the Baltic with Boy Scouts. On 9th June 1933 she started a summer season of voyages from Liverpool to Montreal before being laid up again at Milford Haven. After only 16 years service she was sold for £31,000 and scrapped at Rosyth during 1935.

BALLENA was built in 1919 by W Dobson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 5210grt, a length of 400ft 1in, a beam of 52ft 4in and a service speed of 11 knots. She was launched on 7th November 1919 as a standard “B” type vessel and entered service with PSNC in 1920. She was sold to Rethymnis & Kulukundis of Panama and renamed Mount Ida. Four years later, in March 1937, she became the Mendoza and owned by Hamburg Sud Amerika Line of Hamburg. On 8th December 1940 she collided with Hamburg America’s Adalia off Flushing and on 22nd March 1945 she was sunk by Russian bombers off Pillau.

BOGOTA (3) was built in 1919 by Cammell Laird & Co. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 5167grt, a length of 400ft 1in, a beam of 52ft 4in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Ballena she was launched on 18th March 1919 as the War Lapwing but renamed Bogota before completion. After thirteen years service she was sold to Fratelli G & F Bozzo of Genoa in 1932 and renamed Madda. On 17th June 1937 she was damaged while serving in the Spanish Civil War and in June 1940 she was chased by British warships and, consequently, beached at Teneriffe. She was later refloated and survived WW2 before being sold to Cia Nav. Sota y Aznar (Sir Ramon de la Sota) of Bilbao, Spain who renamed her Monte Nafarrate in 1945. In 1956 she was sold to Angel Riva Suardiaz of Bilbao and renamed Riva de Luna. Two years later her owners changed her name to Rivadeluna and in 1972 ownership was recorded as being Naviera Rivadeluna. She was broken up in 1974.

MAGELLAN (3) was built in 1913 by J C Tecklenborg at Geestemunde with a tonnage of 6553grt, a length of 462ft 4in, a beam of 59ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was built as the Alda for Roland Linie A. G. of Bremen. In 1919 she surrendered to the British Shipping Controller and was placed under the management of PSNC who purchased her in 1920 and renamed her Magellan. After fourteen years further service she was broken up in 1934.

OROPESA (2) was built in 1920 by Cammell Laird at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 14118grt, a length of 530ft, a beam of 66ft 4in and a service speed of 14.5 knots. She was launched on 9th December 1919 and commenced her maiden voyage on 4th September 1920 on the Liverpool – Rio de Janeiro – Buenos Aires service. On 14th May 1921 she was chartered to Royal Mail for their Hamburg – Southampton – New York service but reverted to PSNC on 22nd November 1922 and deployed on the Valparaiso run via the Cape. She was converted to oil during 1924 and in February 1927 began operating to Valparaiso via the Panama Canal. In 1931 she carried the Prince of Wales and Prince George to South America. Later in the year she was laid up at Dartmouth where she remained for over six years. She resumed service in 1937 and was requisitioned as a troopship in September 1939. On 16th January 1941 she was torpedoed three times by U-96 off the coast of Ireland with the loss of 113 lives.

LA PAZ was built in 1920 by Harland & Wolff at Glasgow with a tonnage of 6548grt, a length of 406ft, a beam of 54ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. One of a class of three cargo ships she entered service in 1920. On 1st May 1942 she was torpedoed by U-109 off Florida and subsequently beached. She was later sold, with her cargo of export whisky, to U.S. agents and eventually passed to the War Shipping Administration. In 1945 she was sold to Construction Aggregates Corp. of Chicago, Illinois and no longer engaged in deep sea trading. By 1954 she no longer appeared in Lloyds Registry of Shipping.

LOBOS was built in 1921 by Harland & Wolff at Glasgow with a tonnage of 6479grt, a length of 406ft, a beam of 54ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the La Paz she entered service in 1921 and broken up in 1952.

LOSADA was built in 1921 by Harland & Wolff at Glasgow with a tonnage of 6520grt, a length of 406ft, a beam of 54ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the La Paz she entered service in 1921 and was broken up in 1952.

ALVARADO was built in 1920 by A & J Inglis at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2434grt, a length of 303ft 5in, a beam of 43ft and a service speed of 10.5 knots. The first of three similar ships she was launched as the War Raisin and acquired by MacAndrews & Co. who renamed her Alvarado for their Mediterranean services. She proved to be too large for their operation and was consequently acquired by PSNC for collier duties in 1922. In 1933 she was sold to Cia. Carbonifera Rio-Grandense of Rio de Janeiro who renamed her Herval. She was broken up at Rio de Janeiro during 1965.

ALMAGRO was built in 1920 by A & J Inglis at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2434grt, a length of 303ft 5in, a beam of 43ft and a service speed of 10.5 knots. Launched on 23rd April 1920 she was completed as the Almagro for MacAndrews & Co. Proving to be too large for MacAndrews Mediterranean services she was acquired by PSNC in 1922 for the New York to Valparaiso service. After eleven years service she was sold to Cia. Carbonifera Rio-Grandense of Rio de Janeiro in 1933 and renamed Itaquy. Her owners renamed her Tuquy in 1934 and she continued to trade with them until 1963 when she was sold to undisclosed buyers and renamed Artico. Two years later she was sold to Comissario Maritima Modesta Roma of Rio de Janeiro who renamed her Roma Um. In February 1967 she caught fire during a voyage from Manaus to Areia Branca in the River Amazon and was beached at Belem On 30th October 1967 she capsized and became a total loss.

ARANA was built in 1920 by A & J Inglis at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2434grt, a length of 303ft 5in, a beam of 43ft and a service speed of 10.5 knots. Sister of the Alvarado she was launched on 17th September 1919 as the War Date and completed in January 1920 as the Arana for MacAndrews & Co. She was acquired by PSNC in 1922 for collier work between New York and Valparaiso. Sold in 1933 she became the Chay under the ownership of Cia. Carbonifera Rio-Grandense of Rio de Janeiro. Ten years later she was sold to Cia. Commercio y Navegazione of Rio de Janeiro, retaining her name. In 1958 she was sold to Nav. Mercantil S. A. of Rio de Janeiro, again, without a change of name and was finally broken up at Rio in May 1961.

EBRO was built in 1915 by Workman Clark & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 8489grt, a length of 450ft 4in, a beam of 57ft 9in and a service speed of 13 knots. She was launched on 8th September 1914 for Royal Mail Line and commenced her maiden voyage to South America where she joined the 10th Cruiser Squadron on 28th April 1915. Acquired by PSNC in 1922 she was placed on the New York – Panama Canal – Callao – Valparaiso service. In December 1930 she was laid up in the River Dart where she remained until February 1935 when she was sold to Jugoslavenska Lloyd for £21,000 and renamed Princess Olga. She was sold to Cia. Colonial of Lisbon for their Lisbon – New York and Central American service to Rio de Janeiro and renamed Serpa Pinto. In 1955 she was sold for scrapping in Belgium and realised £115,000.

ESSEQUIBO was built in 1914 by Workman Clark & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 8489grt, a length of 450ft 4in, a beam of 57ft 9in and a service speed of 13 knots. Sister of the Ebro she was launched on 6th July for Royal Mail Line and commenced her maiden voyage to South America on 18th November under the command of Capt. J. C. Chevet. In 1915 she was acquisitioned as a hospital ship and on 15 March in 1917 she was stopped and inspected by U-54, then allowed to continue her voyage. The passengers aboard Essequibo gave three cheers and U54 sent the flag signal “God speed you”. Essequibo replied “Thank you” according to the U54 war diary (see photographs on www.u54.suedholland-ferienhaus.de/html/im_gefecht__1_.html ). She was acquired by PSNC in 1922 and placed on the New York – Panama Canal – Callao – Valparaiso service. In 1930 she was laid up until Mar 1935 when she was sold to Arcos Ltd for £21,000, transferred to the USSR and renamed Neva. She was taken out of Lloyds Register at the owner’s request in 1957.

ORCANA (2) was built in 1903 by Alex Stephen & Sons at Glasgow with a tonnage of 6793grt, a length of 454ft 10in, a beam of 55ft and a service speed of 15 knots. She was built as the Miltiades for the Aberdeen Line and commenced her maiden voyage from London – to Sydney via Cape Town and Melbourne on 3rd November 1903. In 1913 she was lengthened to 504ft 4in, which increased her tonnage to 7814grt, and given a second dummy funnel. She was requisitioned as a troopship in 1915 and returned to commercial service to Australia on 4th June 1920. At the end of 1920 she was purchased by Royal Mail and renamed Orcana. She was transferred to PSNC in 1922 as a replacement for the three ‘O’s which were transferred to the North Atlantic. On 11th August 1922 she commenced the intended ‘Round South America’ service, Liverpool – Montevideo – Valparaiso – Panama Canal – Liverpool but as she was expensive to operate after one voyage she was laid up, firstly at Liverpool and then at Dartmouth. In 1924 she was towed to Holland and broken up at Hendrik-ido-Ambracht.

ORUBA (2) was built in 1904 by Alex Stephen & Sons at Glasgow with a tonnage of 6795grt, a length of 454ft 10in, a beam of 55ft and a service speed of 15 knots. She was launched as the Marathon for the Aberdeen Line on 18th November 1903 and commenced her maiden voyage from London to Sydney via Cape Town and Melbourne on 27th January 1904. In 1912 she was lengthened in the same manner as her sister, the Orcana, which increased her tonnage to 7848grt. In 1915 she was requisitioned for troopship duties. She returned to Aberdeen Line’s Australia service on 21st October 1920 but only made one voyage before she was sold to Royal Mail Line and renamed Oruba. In the following year she was transferred to PSNC and on 26th May 1921 commenced the South American ‘Round America Service’. Being expensive to operate she was laid up in 1922, firstly at Liverpool and then at Dartmouth and was broken up in Germany during 1924.

LAGUNA was built in 1923 by Harland & Wolff at Glasgow with a tonnage of 6466grt, a length of 420ft 6in, a beam of 54ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. She began operating in 1923 via the Panama Canal and after an uneventful career was broken up at Barrow-in-Furness in 1952.

OROYA (3) was built in 1923 by Harland & Wolff at Glasgow with a tonnage of 12257grt, a length of 525ft 4in, a beam of 62ft 9in and a service speed of 14 knots. Although launched on 16th December 1920 she was immediately laid up in an incomplete state due to a lack of South American passenger traffic. She eventually commenced her maiden voyage on 22nd March 1923 from Liverpool to Valparaiso via the Panama Canal. On 8th September 1931 she was laid up at Dartmouth and remained there until December 1938 when she was sold for breaking up. She left Dartmouth on 1st February 1939 under tow of Smit’s tug Rode See bound for La Spezia in Italy where she was scrapped.

LORETO was built in 1919 by Harland & Wolff at Glasgow with a tonnage of 6682grt, a length of 406ft 2in, a beam of 54ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was built as the Glenade for Glen Line in 1919 and acquired by PSNC in 1924. On 22nd February 1941, under the command of Capt. Philip Hockey, she avoided a confrontation with the German cruisers Scharnhorst and the Gneisenau by steaming into a fog bank when 400 miles off Newfoundland. She was the only ship out of a convoy of six to avoid destruction. In 1951 she was sold to Motor Lines Ltd of Greenock and renamed Barbeta. She was broken up at Briton Ferry in November 1952.

LORIGA was built in 1919 by Harland & Wolff at Glasgow with a tonnage of 6665grt, a length of 406ft 2in, a beam of 54ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was built as the Glenariffe for Glen Line and purchased by PSNC in 1924 and renamed Loriga. In 1951 she was sold to Ocean Transportation Co. of Panama, renamed Oceanus Venus and broken up in Japan during 1953.

LAGARTO was built in 1915 by Harland & Wolff at Glasgow with a tonnage of 5075grt, a length of 385ft 1in, a beam of 52ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was built as the Glenavy for Glen Line in 1915 and acquired by PSNC in 1924 who renamed her Lagarto. After an uneventful career she was broken up at Troon in 1948.

TEMUCO was built in 1925 by Harland & Wolff at Glasgow with a tonnage of 110grt, a length of 86ft, and a beam of 19ft. She was built as a tug and water tender at Valparaiso and sold locally in 1942.

CHAMPERICO was built in 1911 by Caledon Shipbuilding Co. at Dundee with a tonnage of 2548grt, a length of 290ft 1in, a beam of 41ft 8in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was built as the Andorinha for Yeoward Bros. of Liverpool for their Liverpool – Madeira – Canary Island service. Acquired by PSNC and renamed Champerico in 1917 she was placed on coastal passenger services along the Peruvian and Central American coasts. She was sold to Torres y Ward Cia. of Valparaiso in 1934 and renamed Vina del Mar after a local holiday resort. During the 1930’s she was transferred to the Chilean State Railways and in 1950 was transferred with the entire fleet into Empresa Maritima del Estado de Chilena, the State Marine. It is believed that she was broken up in 1966 although only classified by Lloyds until 1960.

REINA DEL PACIFICO was built in 1931 by Harland & Wolff at Glasgow with a tonnage of 17702grt, a length of 551ft 4in, a beam of 76ft 4in and a service speed of 18 knots. When launched on 23rd September 1930 she was PSNC’s largest ship, the first with a white hull and the first passenger ship with a name which didn’t begin with ‘O’. After a 3 day shake down cruise in the North Sea she commenced her maiden voyage on 9th April 1931 from Liverpool – La Rochelle – Vigo – Bermuda – Bahamas – Havana – Jamaica – Panama Canal – Guayaquil – Callao – Antofagasta – Valparaiso. The total passage time was 25.5 days. On 19th January 1932 she recommenced a ‘Round South America’ which was undertaken once annually. In 1936 she completed the voyage to Valparaiso in a record 25 days. On 3rd August 1939, after arriving at Liverpool, she was despatched to the Clyde where she was put on standby pending the outbreak of war. When war was declared on 3rd September she left the Clyde as part of a 17 ship convoy bound for the Far East. After one voyage to Halifax in December 1939 she returned to Liverpool where she was converted into a troopship. On 11th April she sailed from the Clyde with four other troopships bound for Harstad in Norway and the Bygden Fjord where they steamed in circles for two hours while the Fjord was depth charged by the escorts. She was bombed during the embarkation but suffered no damage. In the following May she returned to Norway to evacuate troops and then proceeded to West Africa. On 24th July 1940 she sailed for Suez via Cape Town with RAF personnel, their Spitfires being carried by the accompanying aircraft carrier Argus. She repeated the same voyage on 14th November. In January 1941 she carried the 4th Indian Division from Suez to Port Sudan from where the troops proceeded to Ethopia. Back in Avonmouth by the March she was bombed for three successive nights but suffered no damage. Moved to the Clyde she was bombed again but incurred no damage. On 22nd March 1941 and loaded with troops she struck a submerged object in the Bristol Channel and shed a propeller forcing her to return to Liverpool for repairs. Whilst in Liverpool she was subjected to air attacks on 15th April but although a delayed action bomb exploded in the water alongside she suffered no damage and left on time with troops bound for Cape Town. After a second voyage to South Africa she undertook North Atlantic crossings out of Halifax before commencing a voyage from Liverpool – Cape Town – Bombay – Colombo – Liverpool. On 12th April 1942 she repeated the voyage to Colombo. She made one trip to North America on 6th August to fetch US and Canadian troops and when she returned to Liverpool she was dry docked, repainted and the lifeboats replaced with landing craft. On 13th September she proceeded to the Clyde and, together with other troopships, commenced practice landing operations. These continued until 17th October when a full rehearsal for the North Africa landings were undertaken at Loch Linne. On 21st October she embarked troops for the ‘Z’ landing at Oran and as flagship to Senior Naval Officer Landing proceeded to the Mediterranean. As the Algiers force had to be 24 hours ahead of the Oran force the Reina del Pacifico, at one stage, had to steam on a reverse course for 8 hours so that she could sail through the Straits of Gibraltar in darkness. At 15.30hrs on 7th November she met up with the equipment ships and then, at 20.00hrs, rendez-voused with the marker submarine. By 23.30hrs she was in position, one of 102 ships assembled for the landing operation. At 07.00hrs on the following morning her landing craft were disembarked and went to the assembly area where they proceeded ashore. The Reina del Pacifico later berthed in Oran harbour. By 24th November she was back in the Clyde embarking reinforcements for Algiers. On 5th January 1943 she took reinforcements to Oran and later in the year, on 5th May, arrived at Suez to begin practicing for the Sicily landings. On 29th June she embarked the 51st Highland Division landing them at Avola Beach, Sicily on 10th July. She then sailed to Malta before proceeding to Oran where she evacuated 500 German prisoners of war. During this time she was twice attacked by the Luftwaffe. On 23rd July she arrived back in the Clyde. In the following August she carried King Peter of Jugoslavia, together with his entourage, from Liverpool to Suez from where she proceeded to Taranto and Port Augustus with troops. When she was in Sicily she embarked the U. S. First Division H. Q. Staff for passage to Britain where they began preparations for the Normandy landings. On 15th November 1943 she sailed form Liverpool to Bombay in a convoy of 20 ships carrying troops. The convoy was attacked on 26th November by 60 aircraft and Lamport and Holt’s Delius was the only loss. Three days later the convoy was again attacked by 24 JU 88’s but although they scored several hits no ships were lost. In January 1944 she sailed on a trooping voyage to East Africa and then spent ten months ferrying troops in the Mediterranean. In December of 1944 she sailed from Liverpool to New York with a call in Iceland before going to the Pacific where she continued trooping duties until the end of hostilities. During 1946 she was deployed as a Repatriation ship sailing some 350,000 miles and returning some 150,000 men and women of over 20 nationalities to their homelands. In January 1947 she returned to her builders where she was refurbished. As her fittings, removed when she was converted for war duties, had been destroyed during the bombing new furniture was installed. Her sea trials commenced on 10th September and on the following day the outer No.2 engine overheated and blew up killing 28 engine room personnel. She returned to service in 1948 on the Liverpool – Valparaiso service, a year later than anticipated. On 8th July 1957 she went aground on Devil’s Flat, Bermuda and came off two days later without incurring any damage. In the following November she lost a propeller in Havana and a new one was delivered by the Salinas. On 27th April 1958 she sailed on her last voyage before being withdrawn from service and subsequent scrapping at the BISCO yard of John Cashmore at Newport in Monmouthshire. One of the shi’s anchors is exhibited at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich.

TALCA (3) was built in 1943 by Bethlehem Fairfield Shipyard Inc. at Baltimore, Maryland with a tonnage of 7219grt, a length of 42ft 9in, a beam of 57ft and a service speed of 14 knots. She was laid down as the Orville P. Taylor and completed as the Samothrace for management by Royal Mail Lines. Acquired by PSNC in 1947 she was renamed Talca. In 1953 she was sold to Cia. Naviera Aris S. A. of Puerto Limon, Costa Rica and renamed Popi. Eight years later she was sold to Atlas Maritime Finance Corp of Beirut and renamed Lydia. After a further six years service she was broken up at Whampoa, China in July 1967.

SAMANCO was built in 1943 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 6413grt, a length of 466ft 4in, a beam of 62ft 9in and a service speed of 15 knots. On 17th October 1951 she collided with Prudential Steam Ship Co’s George Uhler off Dungeness. She was sold to Deutsche Dampschiff “Hansa” and renamed Reichenfels in 1956. In 1962 she was finally broken up in Spain.

SARMIENTO (2) was built in October 1943 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 8335grt, a length of 466ft 4in, a beam of 62ft 9in and a service speed of 15 knots. Sister of the Samanco she remained with the company until 1967 when she was sold to Eagle Ocean Shipping Co. of Famagusta,Cyprus and was renamed Monomachos. In 1969 she was renamed the Gladiator under the same ownership. On 28th February 1971 she sailed from Havana bound for Shanghai where she was broken up.
(Photo: John Clarkson Collection)

SALAMANCA was built in 1948 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 6704grt, a length of 467ft, a beam of 62ft and a service speed of 13 knots. An “S” class ship she entered service on the UK – Bermuda – Bahamas – Cuba – Colombia – Panama – Colombia (Pacific) – Ecuador – Peru – Chile run. She was sold to El Chaco Cia. Nav. S. A. of Piraeus and renamed Kronos. On 17th October 1972 she sailed from Singapore bound for Shanghai where she was broken up.

SALINAS was built in 1947 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 6705grt, a length of 466ft 4in, a beam of 62ft 9in and a service speed of 15 knots. Similar to the Samanco she was completed in November 1947. During the Suez crisis in 1956 she carried troops and stores to Cyprus and was lead ship on the convoy that entered Port Said on 6 November 1956. In 1968 she was sold for £160,000 to Polyfimos Cia. Nav. of Greece and renamed Polyfimos. On 6th December 1972 she sailed from Singapore bound for Shanghai where she was broken up. (Photo: Fotoflite)

SALAVERRY was built in 1946 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 6647grt, a length of 466ft 4in, a beam of 62ft 9in and a service speed of 15 knots. Sister of the Salinas she was sold in 1967 for £150,000 to Detabi Cia. Nav. of Piraeus, Greece and renamed Pelias. On 12th december 1972 she sprang a leak in the engine room and sank some 250 miles south of Durban without any loss of life. (Photo: John Clarkson Collection)

SANTANDER was built in 1946 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 6648grt, a length of 466ft 4in, a beam of 62ft 9in and a service speed of 15 knots. Sister of the Salinas she was sold to Navmachos Steam Ship Co. of Famagusta for £147,500 in 1967 and renamed Navmachos. On 9th December 1971 she was sold for $166,000 and broken up in Spain by Villaneuva y Geltru. (Photo; John Clarkson Collection)

REINA DEL MAR was built in 1956 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 20263grt, a length of 600ft 10in, a beam of 78ft 5in and a service speed of 17 knots. Launched on 7th June 1955 and costing £5,000,000 she commenced her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Valparaiso via the Panama Canal on 3rd may 1956. At the time she was the largest, fastest and only fully air-conditioned passenger liner operating a regular service between the UK, France, Spain and the west coast of South America. On 5th March 1964 she completed her final South American voyage and was chartered to the South African Max Wilson’s Travel Savings Association for cruising and transatlantic summer sailings. The shareholders of TSA became Canadian Pacific, Union-Castle and Royal Mail. During 1964 she was refurbished for her new role and equipped with a cinema and extra lido decks as it was also the intention to use the ship as a hotel at its ports of call. Under Union-Castle management the ship commenced her first sailing to New York on 10th June 1964. In the October Union-Castle became the sole owner of TSA but not the ship. However, in the November the ship was painted in Union-Castle livery and operated winter cruises from South Africa to South America; Union-Castles only venture into the cruise business. In 1969 Royal Mail became the registered owner of all PSNC ships but the Reina del Mar never traded under the Royal Mail umbrella and was chartered to Union-Castle for five years. In 1973 she was acquired by Union-Castle before the charter expired and traded for a further two years before being broken up at Kaohsiung in Taiwan by Tung Cheng Steel Co. in late 1975.

KENUTA (2) was built in 1950 by Greenock Dockyard Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 8494grt, a length of 512ft 7in, a beam of 66ft 4in and a service speed of 16 knots. She was originally laid down for Clan Line but, together with the Flamenco, was purchased on the stocks in August 1950. After 21 years service with the company she was towed by the tug Mumbles to Antwerp where she was broken up. (Photo: Jim Pottinger)

FLAMENCO (2) was built in 1950 by Greenock Dockyard Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 8491grt, a length of 512ft 7in, a beam of 66ft 4in and a service speed of 16 knots. Sister of the Kenuta she entered service in December 1950 on the South American PSNC service. She was sold to Cia. de Nav. Abeto S.A. and renamed Pacific Abeto. After a further sixteen years service she was broken up at Chittagong during 1982. (Photo: John Clarkson Collection)

POTOSI (4) was built in 1955 by Greenock Dockyard Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 8494grt, a length of 512ft 7in, a beam of 66ft 4in and a service speed of 16 knots. She was launched on 23rd February 1955 for the South American cargo services. In 1972 she was sold to Granvias Oceanicos Armadora S.A. of Piraeus and renamed Kavo Pieratis. For years later, in October 1976, she was sold to W. H. Arnott Young & Co and broken up at Dalmuir.

PIZARRO (2) was built in 1955 by Greenock Dockyard Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 8564grt, a length of 512ft 7in, a beam of 66ft 4in and a service speed of 16 knots. Sister of the Kenuta she entered service on the round South America cargo service on 14th October 1955. She was sold to Navieros Progresivos S.A. of Piraeus and renamed Kavo Maleas. In November 1974 she was broken up by Chin Ho Fa Steel and Iron Works at Kaohsiung. (Photo: Jim Pottinger)

COTOPAXI (2) was built in 1954 by Wm Denny & Co. at Dumbarton with a tonnage of 8559grt, a length of 512ft 6in, a beam of 66ft 4in and a service speed of 16 knots. Completed in April 1954 she was sold in 1973 to Transportes Mundiales Armadora S. A. of Piraeus and renamed Kavo Longos. Two years later, in November 1975, she was broken up in China.

CUZCO (2) was built in 1951 by Blyth Dry Docks & Shipbuilding Co. at Blyth with a tonnage of 8038grt, a length of 501ft, a beam of 64ft 2in and a service speed of 15.5 knots. She was laid down as the Thurland Castle for James Chambers & Co. of Liverpool but acquired by PSNC who renamed her Cuzco. After fourteen years service she was sold to Wm. Thomson’s Benlarig Shipping Co., with Ben Line as managers and renamed Benattow. On 25th September 1977 she arrived at Kaohsiung where she was broken up by Sing Ching Yung Steel Co.

ELEUTHERA was built in 1959 by Hall Russell & Co. at Aberdeen with a tonnage of 5407grt, a length of 386ft 2in, a beam of 54ft 3in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. She entered service in May 1959 and continued with the company until 1970 when she was laid up in the River Fal and put up for sale. In the following year she was sold to Seahunter Shipping Co. of Famagusta and renamed Mimi-M. Three years later she was sold to Valient Bay Shipping Co. of Piraeus and renamed Maria. After a further ten years service she arrived at Gadani Beach in Pakistan on 1st November 1984 where she was broken up.

SOMERS ISLE was built in 1959 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 5684grt, a length of 396ft, a beam of 54ft 3in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. Sister of the Eleuthera she entered service on the Bermuda – Caribbean ports – Panama run. In 1970 she was laid up in the River Fal and put up for sale. Sold to Sealord Shipping Co.of Famagusta in 1971 she was renamed Eldina. Four years later she was sold to Commencement Compania Naviera S. A. of Famagusta and renamed Commencement. In 1982 her owners renamed her Caribbean and a year later she became the Melpol under the ownership of Commencement Maritime Enterprises of Jersey. In December 1983, during a voyage from Lisbon to Bremen, she was damaged by fire in the English Channel with the loss of one life. In the following year she was laid up and eventually scrapped. (Photo: Jim Pottinger)

CIENFUEGOS/CHANDELEUR was built in 1959 by Hall Russell & Co. at Aberdeen with a tonnage of 5554grt, a length of 386ft 2in, a beam of 54ft 3in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. Sister of the Eleuthera she entered service as the Cienfuegos in 1959. In 1968 she was renamed Chandeleur and chartered to Royal Mail Line. She was taken out of service in 1970, laid up in the River Fal and put up for sale. In 1971 she was sold to Seacomber Shipping Co. of Famagusta and renamed Emma-M. Three years later she was sold to Green Bay Shipping Co. of Piraeus who renamed her Lela. In 1981 she was sold to the West Asia Shipping Co. of Singapore and renamed Jetpur Viceroy. On 2nd November 1982 she made her final voyage to Chittagong and on 25th April 1983 she was decommissioned and broken up.

OROYA (4) was built in 1956 by Bremer Vulcan at Vegesack with a tonnage of 6311grt, a length of 475ft, a beam of 44ft 4in and a service speed of 17 knots. Built as the Arabic for Shaw, Savill & Albion she was transferred to PSNC in 1968. In 1970 she was managed by Furness Withy as the Pacific Ranger but in the following year reverted to PSNC as the Oroya. She was sold to the Hong Kong Ocean Shipping Co. of Panama in 1972 who renamed her Lamma Island. After a further eleven years service she arrived at Inchon in Korea on 28th May 1983 where she was broken up by Inchon Iron & Steel Co.

ORITA (3) was built in 1957 by Bremer Vulcan at Vegesack with a tonnage of 6311grt, a length of 475ft, a beam of 44ft 4in and a service speed of 17 knots. Sister of the Oroya she was built as the Afric for Shaw Savill & Albion of London. She was transferred to PSNC in 1968 and renamed Orita. In 1972 she was sold to Hong Kong Islands Shipping Co. of Panama and renamed Hong Kong Island. On 1st May 1983 she arrived at Inchon Iron & Steel Co. at Inchon in Korea where she was being broken up.

OROPESA (3) was built in 1957 by Bremer Vulcan at Hamburg with a tonnage of 6553grt, a length of 475ft, a beam of 44ft 4in and a service speed of 17 knots. Sister of the Oroya she was completed for Shaw Savill & Albion as the Aramaic and transferred to PSNC in 1968 who renamed her Oropesa. In 1970 she was briefly renamed Pacific Exporter for operation by Furness Withy before reverting to her former name. She was sold to Hong Kong Atlantic Shipping Co. of Panama in 1972 and renamed Lantao Island. After a further ten years trading she arrived at Kaohsiung on 29th September 1982 where she was broken up.

WILLIAM WHEELWRIGHT was built in 1960 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 31320grt, a length of 753ft 6in, a beam of 98ft 5in and a service speed of 16 knots. An oil tanker her registered owner was Pacific Maritime Services Ltd and she was chartered on a long term contract to Shell. On 26th December 1975 she ran aground off Sinoe, south of Monrovia in Liberia whilst in ballast. She was refloated three days later and towed to Lisbon where examination revealed that she was beyond repair. Returning to PSNC ownership she was towed to Santander in October 1976 where she was broken up by Recuperaciones Submarines S.A.

COLOSO was built in 1961 by A Hall & Co. at Aberdeen with a tonnage of 293grt, a length of 101ft, a beam of 26ft 1in and a service speed of 11 knots. She was a tug based at Antofagasta flying the Chilean flag and with ownership registered as Servicios Maritimos S.A. of Antofagasta. In she was sold to Ultramar Agencia Maritima of Valparaiso in 1976 and renamed Ultramar IV. She now appears to be out of service.

GEORGE PEACOCK was built in 1961 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 19153grt, a length of 643ft39in, a beam of 80ft 11in and a service speed of 15.75 knots. She was an oil tanker registered as being owned by Pacific Maritime Services Ltd. In 1969 she was sold to V. J. Vardinoyannis of Piraeus and renamed Georgis V. Twelve years later, in 1981,she was sold to Varnicos (Varnima Corp) of Piraeus who retained her name. In 1985 she appeared to be laid up but it now seems that she is out of service. (Photo: Dave Edge)

ORCOMA (2) was built in 1966 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 10300grt, a length of 508ft 9in, a beam of 70ft 2in and a service speed of 18 knots. She was built for the Furness Withy subsidiary company Nile Steamship Co. and chartered to PSNC for 20 years. In 1970 she was used as a British Exhibition ship reverting to her normal South American services in the following year. She was sold to P. T. Samudera of Indonesi in October 1979 and renamed Ek Daya Samudera. On 31st March 1984 she arrived at Kaohsiung where she was broken up by Tai Yuan Steel & Iron Co.

ORBITA (2) was built in 1972 by Cammell Laird & Co. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 12321grt, a length of 529ft 8in, a beam of 73ft 4in and a service speed of 18 knots. She was built for PSNC who, by 1972 ,was part of the Royal Mail Division of Furness Withy and operated out of Liverpool. In April 1980 she was sold to Cia. Sud Americana de Vapores of Valparaiso and renamed Andalien. Later in the same year she was sold to Wallem & Co. of Hong Kong and renamed Morning Sun but before the year was out she had returned to Sud Americana with the name Rubens. Although still trading in 1990 she appears to have been broken up in subsequent years.

ORDUNA (2) was built in 1973 by Cammell Laird & Co. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 12321grt, a length of 529ft 8in, a beam of 73ft 4in and a service speed of 18 knots. Sister of the Orbita she was completed for the South American services and in 1980 she registered as owned by Royal Mail Line with PSNC as managers. On 30th September 1982 she was transferred to Furness Withy Shipping who changed her name to Beacon Grange. In 1984 she was sold to Cenargo Ltd. and renamed Merchant Pioneer. As Cenargo Ltd where the building contractors for the airport on the Falkland Islands she was used to carry materials from the UK to Port Stanley. Although still trading in 1990 she appears to have been broken up in subsequent years.

ORTEGA (2)/ANDES (2) was built in 1973 by Cammell Laird & Co. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 12321grt, a length of 529ft 8in, a beam of 73ft 4in and a service speed of 18 knots. Sister of the Orbita she was completed as to Ortega in July 1973. In April 1980 she was renamed Andes when ownership was transferred to Royal Mail Line but she continued to operate for PSNC. She was sold to Blue Haven Co. Ltd of Hong Kong in August 1982 and renamed Oceanhaven. Five years later, in 1987, she was renamed Kota Akbar by her new owner Pacific International Lines (Pte) Ltd. Current shipping directories indicate that she appears to have been broken up in subsequent years.

OROYA (5) was built in 1978 by Lithgows Ltd at Port Glasgow with a tonnage of 9015grt, a length of 535ft 3in, a beam of 75ft 4in and a service speed of 16.25 knots. Registered as owned by Ardgowan Shipping Co. of London with Furness Withy Shipping as managers she entered service with PSNC in April 1978. In 1985 she was transferred to Shaw, Savill & Albion without a change of name and in 1986 was sold to Nigerian Green Lines of Lagos and renamed Yinka Folawiyo. She was purchased by Cenargo Ltd in 1989 and renamed Merchant Premier and managed by V Ships (UK) Ltd. At the present time it appears that she is owned by John McRink & Co. Ltd of Hong Kong with the name Lady Aryette.

OROPESA (4) was built in 1978 by Lithgows Ltd at Port Glasgow with a tonnage of 9015grt, a length of 535ft 3in, a beam of 75ft 4in and a service speed of 16.25 knots. Sister of the Oroya she was registered as being owned by Blackhall Shipping Co. and entered service for PSNC in April 1978. In 1982 she was operated by Shaw, Saville & Albion out of Liverpool. On 25th May 1984 she was sold with the Orduna to Cenargo Ltd for deployment on their Falkland Island service. At the present time it appears that she is owned by John McRink & Co. Ltd of Hong Kong with the name Lady Danielle.

ANDES (3) was built in 1984 by Hyundai Heavy Industries Co. at Ulsan, South Korea with a tonnage of 32150grt, a length of 662ft 10in, a beam of 105ft 7in and a service speed of 18.5 knots. She was launched on 16th November 1983 for Furness Withy but for operation by PSNC as one of seven ships on the Eurosal (Europe South America Line). The seven container ships, the Andes was Furness Withy’s member ship, replaced 28 conventional cargo ships and were equipped with a self unloading gantry for use at ports without container facilities. Still in service in 1990 with Furness Withy she has subsequently been either sold on on several occasions or broken up.

ALBEMARLE was built in 1950 by Burntisland Shipbuilding Co. at Port Burntisland with a tonnage of 3364grt, a length of 364ft 9in, a beam of 51ft 2in and a service speed of 14 knots. She was built as the Afric for Prince Line but for charter to Shaw Savill & Albion another Furness Withy subsidiary company. In 1955 she was chartered to PSNC and renamed Albemarle for deployment on an experimental service between Bermuda – Caribbean ports – Panama. The routing proved to be successful and three further ships, the Cienfuegos, the Eleuthera and the Somer’s Isle were ordered. In 1957 she was transferred back to Prince Line and renamed Scottish Prince. After eleven years service with Prince Line she was sold to Klimnos Shipping Co. of Cyprus and renamed Grigorios. In 1972 she was acquired by Milos Steam Ship Co. of Cyprus who renamed her Milos. The same owner renamed her Nestor II in 1975 and on 23rd December 1977 she arrived at Gadani Beach, Karachi where she was broken up.

WALSINGHAM was built in 1950 by Burntisland Shipbuilding Co. at Port Burntisland with a tonnage of 3343grt, a length of 363ft, a beam of 51ft 2in and a service speed of 14 knots. Sister of the Albemarle she was built as the Sycamore for Furness Withy’s Johnston Warren Lines. In 1950 she was chartered to PSNC for operation on the same route as the Albemarle and renamed Walsingham. She reverted back to Johnston Warren and Sycamore in 1957 and in 1966 was transferred to Prince Line and renamed Merchant Prince. Two years later she was sold to Kaldelion Shipping Co. of Limassol and renamed Elias L. She was sold to Melteco Navigation Ltd of Limassol in 1975 and renamed Meltemi, a name which was shortened to Temi when she was sold on to Green Spirit Inc. of Limassol in 1978. On 10th May 1979 she arrived at Gadani Beach, Karachi where she was broken up.

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