History of the Merchant Navy
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ELIZABETH was a 445 ton sailing ship built at Bristol in 1832 for Miles & Co. She was acquired by PSNC in January 1840 to transport coal to Valparaiso where she was to be converted into a coal hulk. However, the crew deemed here unseaworthy for a voyage round Cape Horn and she was subsequently sold in the February.

PORTSEA was a 451 ton sailing barque built at Calcutta in 1808 for the London – Calcutta trade. She was acquired by PSNC in February 1840 as a replacement for the Elizabeth. After completing the voyage to Valparaiso she had her topmasts and yards removed and was used as a coal hulk. Her subsequent disposal is not recorded.

CECILIA was a 325 ton sailing barque built at Dunbar in 1815 for Alexander & Co. of Glasgow for their Clyde – Australia service. She was acquired by PSNC in 1841 for a voyage to Valparaiso where her topmasts and yards were removed prior to being used as a coal hulk. Her subsequent disposal is not recorded.

JASPER, of which no details are known, sailed to Valparaiso with a cargo of coal and was converted into a coal hulk at one of the South American stations. Details of her disposal are not known.

CHILE (1) was built in 1840 by Curling & Young at Limehouse, London with a tonnage of 682grt, a length of 198ft, a beam of 29ft and a service speed of 8 knots. Launched on 18th April 1840 at a cost of £11935 she was a paddle steamer with sails on two masts. The funnel was hinged so that when she was under sail only it could be stowed in the horizontal position on chocks. She had accommodation for 116 passengers and 64 crew members. Under the command of Capt. Glover she commenced her maiden voyage on 24th June 1840 from Gravesend to Valparaiso via Falmouth, Rio de Janeiro, and the Straits of Magellan. When she arrived at Point Famine she rendezvoused with her sister, the Peru, so that they could sail into Valparaiso at the same time on 16th October. In 1841 she struck a reef and had to return to Valparaiso in a sinking condition where she was repaired and returned to service with the funnel forward of the paddle boxes. She was replaced by the Santiago in 1852 and sold to the Chilean Government. Her subsequent history is unknown.

PERU (1) was built in 1840 by Curling & Young at Limehouse, London with a tonnage of 690grt, a length of 198ft, a beam of 29ft and a service speed of 8 knots. Sister of the Chile she commenced her maiden voyage under the command of Capt. George Peacock on 10th July 1840 from Gravesend to Valparaiso via Falmouth and the Straits of Magellan. She then made the first coastal sailing between Valparaiso and Callao which took eight days. She was due to be sold in 1852 after being replaced by the Lima but before that could happen she stranded and was lost.

BOLIVIA (1) was built in 1849 by Robert Napier at Govan, Glasgow with a tonnage of 773grt, a length of 197ft 6in, a beam of 26ft and a service speed of 8 knots. Similar to the Chile she commenced her maiden voyage under command of Capt. Brown on 23rd October 1849 from Liverpool to Valparaiso via Madeira and Rio de Janeiro. On arrival she was deployed on the Valparaiso – Antofagasta – Callao service. She was reduced to a coal hulk at Valparaiso in 1870 and nine years later was towed out to sea and scuttled.

ECUADOR (1) was built in 1845 by Tod & MacGregor at Glasgow with a tonnage of 323grt, a length of 120ft 8in, a beam of 21ft 6in and a service speed of 8 knots. A simple side wheel paddle steamer she was the company’s first iron hulled ship and commenced her maiden voyage in January 1846 under the command of Capt. N. Glover from Liverpool to Callao via Valparaiso. She was then deployed on the Callao – Guayaquil – Panama coastal service which linked with Royal Mail’s Panama overland route. In 1850 she was deemed too small for the service and was sold to Pacific Mail Steamship Corp. of America. After three further years service she was wrecked at Coquimbo.

NEW GRANADA (1) was built in 1846 by Smith & Rodgers at Glasgow with a tonnage of 694grt, a length of 177ft 5in, a beam of 24ft 7in and a service speed of 8 knots. A schooner rigged side wheel paddle steamer she commenced her maiden voyage in August 1846 under the command of Capt. John Williams from Liverpool to Callao via Madeira, Rio de Janeiro and Valparaiso. She was placed with the Ecuador on the Callao – Guayaquil – Panama service. She was disposed of in 1850 but details of the sale and subsequent history are not recorded. As a point of interest, New Granada was the former name of the Republic of Colombia.

SANTIAGO (1) was built in 1851 by Robert Napier at Govan, Glasgow with a tonnage of 961grt, a length of 246ft 4in, a beam of 28ft and a service speed of 10 knots. The first of four paddle steamers, which together cost £140,000, were built to replace the Chile, the Peru, the Ecuador and the New Granada. She was delivered for the Liverpool – Valparaiso service under the command of Captain Hind. In 1857 she was sold to the Peruvian Government and converted, initially, into a frigate and then a non-seagoing training ship.

LIMA (1) was built in 1851 by Robert Napier at Govan, Glasgow with a tonnage of 1461grt, a length of 249ft 6in, a beam of 29ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She commenced her maiden voyage on 2nd October 1851 and completed the voyage from Liverpool to Valparaiso at an average speed of 9.75 knots consuming 2 tons of coal per hour. In 1852 she was fired upon by shore batteries when she called to deliver the mails at Guayaquil. She was the company’s first ship to return to Liverpool in 1854 where she was lengthened and a compound engine installed. This gave her a new speed of 10.5 knots on 1 ton of coal per hour. On 11th July 1863 she was wrecked off Lagartija Island in Southern Chile.
QUITO (1) was built in 1852 by Robert Napier at Govan, Glasgow with a tonnage of 1461grt, a length of 248ft 8in, a beam of 28ft and a service speed of 10 knots. a slightly larger sister of the Santiago she commenced her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Valparaiso on 25th January 1852. In August of the following year during a voyage from Panama to Valparaiso she was lost on a reef 12 miles from Huasco..

BOGOTA (1) was built in 1852 by Robert Napier at Govan, Glasgow with a tonnage of 1461grt, a length of 248ft 8in, a beam of 28ft and a service speed of 10 knots. The last of the quartet she commenced her maiden voyage on 25th February 1852 from Liverpool to Valparaiso and in 1856 returned to Liverpool where she was equipped with a compound engine. In 1871 she struck a reef off Tarada Point but was salvaged and reduced to a coal hulk. Seven years later, in 1878, she was towed out to sea and scuttled.

LA PERLITA was built in 1853 by Bank Quay Foundry Co. at Warrington with a tonnage of 140grt, a length of 106ft, a beam of 17ft 5in and a service speed of 9 knots. A simple side wheel paddle steamer she was built for the Buenaventura (Colombia – Panama service but on 17th June she left Liverpool on her delivery voyage under the command of Capt. Maughan and disappeared without trace. The journey, via the Straits of Magellan, was over 11,000 miles and an incredible undertaking for a vessel so small.

OSPREY was built in 1852 at Glasgow with a tonnage of 609grt, a length of 169ft 7in, a beam of 18ft 6in and a service speed of 9 knots. A simple side wheel paddle steamer she was built as the Osprey for the City of Cork Steam Ship Co. She was acquired in the following year for the Callao – Pisco – Huacho service but was lost during the voyage out to Peru.

VALDIVIA (1) was built in 1853 by Caird & Co. at Cartsdyke, Greenock with a tonnage of 573grt, a length of 128ft 6in, a beam of 21ft 2in and a service speed of 9 knots. She was the company’s first screw propelled ship and the only one with a wooden hull. The intention was to use her as a coastal feeder ship but she proved to be too small. She completed her delivery voyage from Liverpool to Valparaiso in 1853 and four years later she stranded and was lost near Valparaiso.

PANAMA (1) was built in 1854 by John Reid & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 270grt, a length of 128ft 6in, a beam of 21ft 2in and a service speed of 9 knots. Iron hulled, she was built as a replacement for the La Perlita but after commencing her maiden voyage from Liverpool in April 1854 she struck a rock and sank near Point Tamar.

INCA (1) was built in 1856 by Caird & Co. at Cartsdyke, Greenock with a tonnage of 290grt, a length of 130ft 8in, a beam of 20ft 9in and a service speed of 9 knots. Sister of the Valdivia she was , with the Valparaiso, the first ship to be fitted with the compound inverted engine. In 1852 John Elder went into partnership with Charles Randolph as Randolph & Elder. On 24th January 1853 they secured the patent for the vertical direct acting compound engine. A high pressure cylinder and a low pressure cylinder moved in opposite directions to drive two diametrically opposed crankshafts. The compound engine reduced coal consumption by 30% and the first ship to be fitted with such an engine was the Brandon. On 15th March 1856 Randolf & Elder took out a patent for an improved compound engine in the form of a “V” which saved space and which was described as compound inverted. In 1858 the two partners acquired the old yard of James Napier & Hoey and added shipbuilding to their activities. Charles Randolf retired in 1868 and the company became John Elder & Co., a name which, in 1885, was changed to Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. Ltd. The Inca was delivered in 1856 for deployment on the Callao to Chala mail service. She was sold in 1874, renamed Union and later in the same year was wrecked at Puerto Bueno in Chile.

VALPARAISO (1) was built in 1856 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1060grt, a length of 234ft 1in, a beam of 29ft 1in and a service speed of 13 knots. On completion she sailed from Liverpool to Valparaiso where she was deployed on the Valparaiso – Chileo service with nine ports of call. On 20th February 1871 she was wrecked on Lagartiga Island, Chile during a voyage from Calbuco to Ancud. Although known about locally the wreck wasn’t identified and some relics removed until 1976.

CALLAO (1) was built in 1858 by John Reid & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 700grt, a length of 235ft, a beam of 29ft and a service speed of 13 knots. Similar to the Valparaiso she was built for the Valparaiso – Pacific ports – Panama service and remained there until she was converted into a coal hulk at Valparaiso.

CLODA was built in 1857 at Glasgow with a tonnage of 699grt, a length of 214ft 5in, a beam of 30ft 5in and a service speed of 9 knots. She was built for an Irish company, supposedly by Randolph & Elder although, at the time, all newbuildings were compounded at John Elder’s yard. Purchased by PSNC in 1858 for the South American Pacific Coast services she remained with the company until 25th January 1865 when she was lost off Huacho in Peru without any loss of life.

PRINCE OF WALES was built in 1854 by W Simons & Co. at Whiteinch with a tonnage of 700grt, a length of 195ft 5in, a beam of 26ft 4in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was built as the Prince of Wales with a funnel, red with a black top, whose rake great than that of the masts, but not acquired by PSNC until 1858 to replace the Valdivia. In the following year she was wrecked on the coast of Chile.

ANNE was built in 1854 by Chas Rennoldson at South Shields with a tonnage of 344grt, a length of 153ft 4in, a beam of 22ft and a service speed of 9 knots. She was built for the South American Mining Co. of London for trading between Valparaiso and Puerto Montt. Acquired by PSNC in 1859 to replace the Prince of Wales she was deemed too small and sold in 1864. Her career thereafter is unknown.
SAN CARLOS was built in 1860 at Renfrew with a tonnage of 652grt, a length of 199ft 9in, a beam of 30ft 2in and a service speed of 9 knots. She was built for the Callao – Guayaquil – Panama service and sold in 1874 to unspecified buyers.

GUAYAQUIL was built in 1860 at Renfrew with a tonnage of 661grt, a length of 208ft 8in, a beam of 30ft 2in and a service speed of 9 knots. Sister of the San Carlos she was built for the Callao – Guayaquil – Panama service where she remained until 1870 when she was sold locally for use on a Callao – Galapagos Island service. She was broken up at Callao in 1880.

MORRO (1) was built in 1860 at Glasgow with a tonnage of 132grt, a length of 119ft 7in, and a beam of 20ft 1in. A simple side wheel paddle steamer she was the company’s first ship to be built with a steel hull as a passenger tender based at Panama. She was replaced by the Morro (2) in 1881 and her subsequent career is unknown.

PERUANO was built in 1860 at New York with a tonnage of 639grt, a length of 181ft 6in, and a beam of 29ft 6in. A side wheel paddle steamer she was based at Guayaquil until she was sold in 1874 to Schuber & Co. of Guayaquil. Ten years later her engine was removed and she was converted into a hulk and was possibly used as a warehouse and office.

PERU (2) was built in 1861 by John Reid & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1307grt, a length of 260ft 5in, a beam of 32ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. A side wheel paddle steamer she commenced her maiden voyage on 1st January 1862 from Liverpool to Valparaiso, where she was based, via St. Vincent in the West Indies and Rio de Janeiro. As the American Civil War was in progress she carried three cannon manned by Royal Naval gun crews. Converted to a hulk in 1881 she was supposedly wrecked near Layerto in 1863 but remained in Lloyds Register until 1879/80.

CHILE (2) was built in 1863 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1672grt, a length of 274ft 10in, a beam of 36ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Built to a similar specification as the Peru at a cost pf £53,650 she was delivered to Valparaiso. In 1878 she was sold to the Chilean Government without a change of name and was removed from the registry in 1883.

TALCA (1) was built in 1862 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 708grt, a length of 194ft 1in, a beam of 30ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. A side wheel paddle steamer she was the first PSNC ship to be built with a straight stem as opposed to the clipper bow and entered service on the Chilean coast. In 1865, whilst under the command of Capt. George Chambers, she was requisitioned by President Moreno of Ecuador to quell a local rebellion. When the Talca arrived on the scene flying several battle ensigns the rebels fled and the ship continued on her voyage as if nothing had happened. Her engines were removed in 1874 prior to being converted into a hulk and in 1880 she was taken out to sea and scuttled.

QUITO (2) was built in 1863 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1388grt, a length of 271ft, a beam of 32ft 10in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. A side wheel paddle steamer she was designed by Thomas Smith and built at a cost of £48,750. She was the first of several classes of ship built for the coastal passenger trade and carried deck and cabin passengers as well as deck cargo which could include cattle. Because of a bowsprit and in order to make a hasty departure should the fierce westerly winds threaten, they tended to berth stern first at most ports. She commenced her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Valparaiso on 27th January 1864 and was sold in the following year. Her subsequent career is not recorded.

PAYTA was built in 1864 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1344grt, a length of 263ft 8in, a beam of 38ft 5in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. Sister of the Quito she entered service on the Pacific coast of South America in 1864 and was sold to the Chilean Government in 1878.

ECUADOR (2) was built in Glasgow during 1864 with a tonnage of 500grt and propelled with a single screw. No other career details are available except that she was lost in 1870.

PACIFIC was built in 1865 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1631grt, a length of 267ft 5in, a beam of 40ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Launched on 28th January 1865 she was delivered in the April and sailed to South America where she operated on the Pacific coast routes. The first of a class of four ships she was , with her sisters, placed temporarily on the Trans – South Atlantic in 1868 and became the only compound engined paddle steamers to be deployed on a transatlantic service. On 13th May 1868 she inaugurated the South America to UK service from Valparaison to Liverpool with calls at Sandy Point (Argentina), Montevideo, Re de Janeiro, St Vincent, Lisbon and St Nazaire. On the first departure under the command of Captain George Conlan she carried 170 passengers and gold and bullion valued at £65,000. The passage time was 43 days. She was eventually hulked in 1880.

SANTIAGO (2) was built in 1865 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1619grt, a length of 267ft 5in, a beam of 40ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Pacific she was launched on 27th May 1865 for service on the South American Pacific coast service. On 13th January 1869 she sailed from Valparaiso with 172 passengers and eight days later entered the Straits of Magellan and anchored off Mercy Harbour to await better weather conditions. On 23rd January she weighed anchor and after sailing for some 2.5 miles was wrecked on an uncharted rock with the loss of 2 seamen and a child.

LIMENA was built in 1865 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1622grt, a length of 267ft 5in, a beam of 40ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Pacific she was built at a cost of £59,000 for the Pacific coast of South America service. In 1868 she was transferred to the Valparaiso to Liverpool service and in 1880 was converted to a hulk at Callao.

PANAMA (2) was built in 1866 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1642grt, a length of 267ft 5in, a beam of 40ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. The last of the quartet, she was delivered for the Pacific coast service in 1866. Two years later she was transferred temporarily to the Valparaiso – Liverpool route to supplement the Pacific. In 1869 she was replaced by the Magellan class of vessel and was converted into a hulk in 1870.

FAVORITA was built in 1865 in New York with a tonnage of 837grt, a length of 197ft 1in, a beam of 30ft 4in and a service speed of 9 knots. Built as a U. S. style riverboat for calm coastal water work she was PSNC’s last wooden ship. In February 1871 she caught fire and was gutted in Callao Bay.

COLON was built in 1861 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1995grt, a length of 286ft 1in, a beam of 39ft and a service speed of 8 knots. Built in 1861 she was not acquired by PSNC until 1866 to replace the lost Cloda. She was sold in 1872 at Valparaiso and her subsequent career is unknown.

ARICA (1) was built in 1867 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 740grt, a length of 204ft, a beam of 30ft and a service speed of 10 knots. She was built for the South coast of South America service. On 13th January 1869 during a voyage from Lambayeque to Callao she stranded off Pacsmayo Point in Peru whilst entering port because the lighthouse was not operating.

QUITO (3) was built in 1867 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 743grt, a length of 204ft, a beam of 30ft and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Arica she operated a similar service. In 1882 she was converted into a coal hulk at Arica.

SUPE was built in 1867 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 298grt, a length of 145ft 7in, and a beam of 25ft 1in. Costing £7,500 she entered service in 1867 as, in PSNC’s terminology, a ‘pig launch’. She was sold in 1882 at Puerto Montt and her subsequent career is unrecorded.

ATLAS was built in 1867 at Paisley in Scotland with a tonnage of 56grt, a length of 70ft 2in, a beam of 17ft 4in and a service speed of 9 knots. Built as a tug for service at Valparaiso she was towed there by the Supe. In 1890 she ran ashore and became a derelict.

CALDERA was built in 1868 by Wm. Denny & Bros. at Dumbarton with a tonnage of 1741grt, a length of 282ft 2in, a beam of 34ft 4in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was launched on 28th June 1868 as the Assam as a speculative build for P & O who did not want her and remained at the yard until 1870 when Denny’s undertook their first compound conversion which increased her speed to 11 knots. Purchased by PSNC for £37,000 in August 1870 she was not a success and was subsequently sold to J. Laird Jrn. in 1876. She was lengthened to 333ft 6in, given a straight stem and had new compound engines installed. In 1879 she was sold to Compagnie Général Transatlantique without a change of name and deployed on their Marseilles to New York service. She was sold to F. Stumore & Co. of London in 1886 and in May 1887 was abandoned at sea off Suakin, Sudan.

MAGELLAN (1) was built in 1868 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2856grt, a length of 359ft 7in, a beam of 41ft and a service speed of 13.5 knots. The first of four ships costing £74,550 each she was launched on 30th December 1868 and commenced her maiden voyage on 13th March 1869. Under the command of Capt. C. H. Sivell she commenced the monthly advertised service from Liverpool to Valparaiso. On 29th March 1870 the sailings were increased to twice monthly at a service speed of 12 knots. She continued in service until 1893 when she was broken up in the River Thames.

PATAGONIA was built in 1869 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2866grt, a length of 353ft, a beam of 41ft and a service speed of 13.5 knots. Sister of the Magellan she commenced her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Valparaiso on 13th May 1869. In March 1877 she was transferred to the River Plate service and on 4th May 1880 was chartered to the White Star Line for one voyage between Liverpool and New York. On 1st October 1895, during a voyage from Liverpool to Valparaiso, she grounded 7 miles north of Tomé at Lingueral without any loss of life.

ARAUCANIA was built in 1869 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2877grt, a length of 354ft 8in, a beam of 41ft and a service speed of 13.5 knots. Sister of the Magellan she commenced her maiden voyage on 13th July 1896 from Liverpool to Valparaiso. She was transferred to the River Plate service in July 1877 and remained for a further twenty years before being sold to Macbeth & Gray of Liverpool in 1897 and her subsequent career is unrecorded.

CORDILLERA was built in 186 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2860grt, a length of 353ft 2in, a beam of 41ft and a service speed of 13.5 knots. Sister of the Magellan she was launched on 26th June 1869 and commenced her maiden voyage to Valparaiso on 13th August. She was transferred to the River Plate service in August 1877. On 20th September 1882 she was lost in the Straits of Magellan.

JOHN ELDER was built in 1869 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3832grt, a length of 381ft 10in, a beam of 41ft 7in and a service speed of 12.5 knots. She was launched on 29th August 1869 with her intended name, Sarmiento, but as John Elder died before completion, the name was changed as a tribute to the man invented the compound engine; an engine which revolutionised maritime transportation. She was PSNC’s largest vessel at the time and the first of 11 similar ships. Comparing favourably with the transatlantic liners of the day she was well advanced of other ships but under-powered. On 2nd February 1872,after completing four round voyages, she returned to the shipyard where she was rebuilt at a cost of £17,000. Her length was increased to 406ft 5in and new boilers and a second funnel were installed. In 1877 she was placed on the joint Orient – PSNC service to Australia and after the mizzen mast was removed commenced her first sailing on 19th April 1877 from Adelaide to Liverpool via the Suez Canal. She reverted to the Liverpool to Valparaiso service on 3rd November 1886. On 17th January 1892 during a voyage from Valparaiso to Talcuhuanco with 139 passenger she stranded on Cape Carranza Rocks in fog without any loss of life.

ATACAMA was built in 1870 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1821grt, a length of 290ft, a beam of 38ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. One of a class of four ships she was built for the Chilean coastal service and was wrecked in 1877.

COQUIMBO was built in 1871 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1821grt, a length of 290ft 7in, a beam of 38ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Atacama she was built for the South American coastal service at a cost of £42,495 and launched 7th December 1869. After twenty one years service she was hulked in 1901.

VALDIVIA (2) was built in 1870 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1821grt, a length of 287ft, a beam of 38ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Atacama she was built for the South American Pacific coastal services. In 1882 she was wrecked off Huacho with the loss of 1 life.

ETEN was built in 1871 by Laird Bros. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 1853grt, a length of 292ft, a beam of 38ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Atacama she was built for the South American Pacific coastal services. In 1877 she was wrecked of Ventura Point with the loss of 120 lives. The cause of the accident was put down to a change of current following an earthquake.

AREQUIPA (1) was built in 1870 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1065grt, a length of 231ft 9in, a beam of 35ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. A side wheel paddle steamer she was ordered as the Casma and built for the South American services at a cost of £38,750. She was hulked in 1883 and sold in 1887.

HUACHO was built in 1870 by Thos. Royden & Sons at Liverpool with a tonnage of 329grt, a length of 149ft 5in, a beam of 25ft 6in and a service speed of 9 knots. One of a pair she was built for the Callao – Arica – Iquique service on the Peruvian coast. In 1882 she was sold to the Governor of Ecuador and in 1894 the registers showed her as being owned by M. J. Kelly of Guayaquil. She was finally deleted from the Register in 1914.

IQUIQUE was built in 1871 by Thos. Royden & Sons at Liverpool with a tonnage of 323grt, a length of 149ft 5in, a beam of 25ft 6in and a service speed of 9 knots. Sister of the Huacho and costing £9,350 she was built for the Peruvian coastal service and based at Callao. She was wrecked in 1877.

CHIMBORAZO was built in 1871 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3847grt, a length of 384ft, a beam of 41ft 4in and a service speed of 13 knots. At a cost of £91,010 she was built for the Liverpool to Valparaiso service, was launched on 21st June 1871 and commenced her maiden voyage on the following 13th October. This class of ship undertook the voyage to Callao in 56.5 days calling at nine ports. Steaming time was 40.5 days at an average speed of 11.4 knots with a coal consumption of 47 tons per day. In 1877 she was chartered to Anderson & Anderson for the Orient – Pacific service and in the following year was purchased by the Orient Steam Navigation Co. without a change of name. On 12th May 1887 she commenced her final voyage from London to Sydney via the Suez Canal and in 1889 was cruising to the Norwegian Fjords. She was sold to P. J. Pitcher of Liverpool in 1894 and renamed Cleopatra for use a a cruise ship by the Polytechnic Touring Association. By 1895 she was owned by the Ocean Cruising & Yachting Co. of London and was broken up at Preston, Lancashire in 1897.

CUZCO (1) was built in 1871 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3898grt, a length of 384ft, a beam of 41ft 4in and a service speed of 13 knots. Sister of the Chimborazo she cost £90,990 and was built for the Liverpool to Valparaiso service commencing her maiden voyage on 13th January 1872. In 1877 she was chartered to Anderson & Anderson for the Orient – Pacific Line and commenced her first voyage from London to Sydney via the Suez Canal on 29th September. The passage time to Adelaide took 40 days 12 hours which was a record. In the following year she was sold to the Orient Steam Navigation Co. without a change of name. In 1888 she was fitted with a triple expansion engine by her builder who had now become the Fairfield Ship Building Co. She was broken up at Genoa in 1905.

GARONNE was built in 1871 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3871grt, a length of 382ft 1in, a beam of 41ft 4in and a service speed of 13 knots. Sister of the Chimborazo she commenced her maiden voyage on the Liverpool to Valparaiso on 29th June 1871. In June 1877 she was sold to the Orient Pacific Line for service to Australia via the Cape and commenced her first sailing to Australia on 17th April 1878. On 6th July 1889 she made her last voyage to Australia before operating as a cruise ship. She was sold to F. Waterhouse of Seattle in 1897 for use during Alaska gold rush and two years later was used by the U. S. Government for trooping during the Spanish – American war. In 1905 she was broken up at Genoa.

LUSITANIA was built in 1871 by Laird Bros. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 3825grt, a length of 384ft, a beam of 41ft 4in and a service speed of 13 knots. Sister of the Chimborazo she was built at a cost of £91,852 and commenced her maiden voyage to Valparaiso on 29th September 1871. A few hours into her return voyage she shed three of her four propeller blades. There wasn’t a dock big enough to take her at Valparaiso and it wasn’t feasible to beach the ship for repairs. Consequently a wooden caisson 24ft x 26ft was built around the stern and when pumped dry the spare propeller was fitted. In February 1877 she was chartered to Orient Line for the Australia service and on 28th June was sold to the Orient Pacific Line. She completed her first voyage from Plymouth to Melbourne via the Cape of Good Hope in 40 days 6 hours at an average speed of 13 knots beating the previous record by 10 days. He return voyage through the Suez Canal took 41 days. In 1878 she came under the ownership of Orient Line and in 1886 was fitted with a triple expansion engine. On 31st March 1900 she was acquired by Elder Dempster’s Beaver Line for their Liverpool – Halifax – St John (New Brunswick) service. In July of the same year she returned to PSNC for six months before returning to Elder Dempster in February 1901 and chartered to Allan Line. On 26th June 1901 she was wrecked on Cape Race during the charter which was only for the summer months.

ACONGAGUA was built in 1872 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4105grt, a length of 404ft 9in, a beam of 41ft 5in and a service speed of 13 knots. Sister of the Chimborazo she was lengthened during construction at a cost of £5,685. Costing £90,970 she was virtually a single funnelled version of the rebuilt John Elder and commenced her maiden voyage to Valparaiso on 28th September 1872. In 1878 she was used by the Orient-Pacific Line as a standby vessel and made her first sailing to Australia via the Cape in 1880. On 24th October 1883 she returned to the Liverpool – Valparaiso service where she remained until 1895 when she was sold to Verdeau et Cie of Bordeaux and renamed Egypte for their Levant routes. She was scrapped in 1896.

SANTIAGO (3) was built in 1871 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1451grt, a length of 251ft 7in, a beam of 35ft 6in and a service speed of 11 knots. A side wheel paddle steamer she was built at a cost of £44,000 for the west coast of South America services. She was sold in 1882 and her subsequent career is unknown.

TABOGUILLA was built in 1871 by Bowdler Chaffer & Co. at Liverpool with a tonnage of 154grt, a length of 115ft 4in, a beam of 21ft 1in and a service speed of 9 knots. She was built as a tender based at Callao and was disposed of in 1893.

SORATA (1) was built in 1872 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4014grt, a length of 401ft 4in, a beam of 42ft 9in and a service speed of 12.5 knots. At a cost of £106,725 she was launched three months late on 2nd October 1872 and on 8th January 1872 commenced her maiden voyage, inaugurating the weekly Liverpool – Bordeaux – Vigo – Lisbon – Rio de Janeiro Sandy Point – Valparaiso – Callao service. She was transferred to Orient Line management in 1879 and on 13th February 1880 made her first voyage for them from London to Australia via Cape Town. After completing her last voyage for Orient Line on 29th April 1886 she reverted back to PSNC and sailed on the Liverpool – Valparaiso service on 22nd September 1886. She was broken up at Tranmere in Cheshire during 1895.