History of the Merchant Navy
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TROJAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1954 by Charles Hill & Co. at Bristol with a tonnage of 1283grt, a length of 256ft 4in, a beam of 38ft 7in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Spartan Prince she was completed as the Lancashire Coast for Coast Lines Ltd in April 1954. In 1968 she was chartered to Prince Line Ltd as the Trojan Prince but only until the following year when she reverted to her former name. In 1980 she was sold to the United West Desert for Development S de RL, with A. Attila Shipping & Trading Co. of Piraeus as managers, renamed Paolino and converted into a livestock carrier for sheep. She was broken up in 1985.

CELTIC PRINCE (2) was built in 1968 by Schps. V/h De Groot at Slikkerveer with a tonnage of 1439grt, a length of 254ft 10in, a beam of 39ft 9in and a service speed of 12.5 knots. She was completed as the Arbon for N. V. Arbon, a single ship company managed by W. F. Kampmann’s Bevrachingsbedrifj of Willemstad, and immediately chartered to Prince Line Ltd as the Celtic Prince. She came off charter in 1977 and reverted to her former name. In 1983 she was purchased by Turbo Shipping Co. of Willemstad and on 1st November 1989, during a voyage from Surinam to Rotterdam, she capsized and sank off Paramaibo with the loss of two lives.

SAILOR PRINCE (4) was built in 1957 by Ottensener A. G. at Hamburg with a tonnage of 2055grt, a length of 334ft 4in, a beam of 45ft 6in and a service speed of 14 knots. She was completed in May 1957 as the Velarde for MacAndrews & Co. Ltd of London and chartered to Prince Line Ltd. in 1969 when her name was changed to Sailor Prince. When she came off charter during 1970 she was sold to Tropica Armadora S. A. of Panama who renamed her Zenit. In 1973 she was acquired by Losinska Plovidba oour Brogarstvo of Losinje and renamed Nadir. On 27th April 1987 she arrived at Split where she was broken up.

TARTAR PRINCE (3) was built in 1959 by Travewerft GmbH at Lubeck with a tonnage of 1187grt, a length of 249ft 5in, a beam of 39ft 9in and a service speed of 13 knots. She was completed in January 1959 as the Egret for the British & Continental Steamship Co. of Liverpool and chartered to Prince Line Ltd. in 1969 and renamed Tartar Prince. Managed briefly by P. A. van Es & Co. of Liverpool she came off charter in 1971 and was immediately sold to Heerema Maritime Services S. A. of Panama. She arrived in Rotterdam on 15th October 1971 for conversion into the survey ship Surveyor for owner Surveyor Shipping Inc. of Panama. Used for oil field drilling work all trace was lost by 1990 when she was no longer registered.

GOTHIC PRINCE (2) was built in 1955 by De Merwde NV. at Hardinxveld with a tonnage of 1938grt, a length of 304ft 11in, a beam of 42ft 5in and a service speed of 13 knots. She was completed in May 1955 as the Prins Willem III for the Oranje Line N. V. of Rotterdam and sold to the Parnon Shipping Co. of Piraeus in 1968 and renamed Amaryllis. Chartered to Prince Line Ltd. in 1969 and renamed Gothic Prince she operated with the company until 1969 when she came off charter and was sold to County Cia. Naviera S. A. of Piraeus. Renamed Xeny she traded until 2nd December 1975 when she was abandoned off Spain when she caught fire during a voyage from Port Harcourt to Rotterdam. On 1st January 1976 she was towed into Cadiz Roads and on the following day capsized and sank at anchor.

GAELIC PRINCE (2) was built in 1956 by Amsterdamsche D. D. Maatschappij with a tonnage of 1938grt, a length of 304ft 11in, a beam of 42ft 5in and a service speed of 13 knots. Sister of the Gothic Prince she was completed as the Prins Willem V for the Oranje Line N. V. of Rotterdam. She was purchased by Verina Shipping Corp of Piraeus in 1967 and renamed Mina for chartering out. Prince Line Ltd chartered her in 1969 as the Gaelic Prince but only until the following year when she reverted to Mina. In 1971 she was acquired by the Livadia Shipping Co. of Famagusta who renamed her Marinos. Two years later she was trading as the Araxos for owners Banimar Shipping Co. of Piraeus and in 1979 was sold to Maharaj Bros. of South Africa. On 21st May 1979 her midships were destroyed by fire and she was towed to Port Elizabeth where she was laid up. She was eventually broken up at Durban in October 1981.

SLAVIC PRINCE (2) was built in 1954 by Scheepswerft ‘De Biesboch’. at Dordrecht with a tonnage of 1475grt, a length of 257ft 11in, a beam of 42ft 6in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. She was launched on 8th December 1953 for the Great Lakes service and completed in 1954 as the Ville de Quebec for Cie General d’Armement Maritime. In 1969 she was sold for £100,000 to Nortena Naviera S. A. of Piraeus who renamed her Suzy. She was then chartered to Prince Line as the Slavic Prince but operated under the Greek flag, with a Greek crew and one Prince liaison officer. In 1970 she reverted to Suzy and on 20th August 1972, during a voyage from Durres to Patras she sank off the Albanian shortly after leaving port with the loss of 11 lives.

MALVERN PRINCE was built in 1970 by Grangemouth Dockyard Co. at Grangemouth with a tonnage of 1459grt, a length of 283ft 10in, a beam of 47ft 6in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. The first of four ships ordered to replaced those chartered she was completed in May 1970 for Prince Line Ltd with Furness, Withy & Co. as managers. She was sold to the Vietnam Government in 1981, renamed Victory 1 and placed under the management of Victory Shipping S. A. of Panama. In 1986 the management contract was terminated and ownership transferred to the Vietnam Sea Transport & Chartering Co. of Ho Chi Min City (Saigon) who renamed her Thang Loi 01. In 2001 she was still trading but with the name slightly changed to Thang Loi-01. (Photo: John Clarkson Collection)

CHILTERN PRINCE was built in 1970 by Clelands Shipbuilding Co. at Wallsend with a tonnage of 1459grt, a length of 285ft, a beam of 47ft 6in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. Sister of the Malvern Prince she was completed in June 1970 as the Chiltern Prince. In 1981 she was sold to the Vietnamese Government who renamed her Friendship for management by Vina-Cub Shipping Co. S.A. of Panama. She was renamed Thang Loi 02 by the Vietnam Sea Transport & Chartering Co. of Saigon in 1986 and in 2001 she was still trading but with the name slightly changed to Thang Loi-02.

MENDIP PRINCE/CHEVIOT PRINCE was built in 1970 by Clelands Shipbuilding Co. at Wallsend with a tonnage of 1459grt, a length of 285ft, a beam of 47ft 6in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. Sister of the Malvern Prince she was completed as the Mendip Prince in October 1970 but for some undisclosed reason Prince Line changed her name to Cheviot Prince in 1974. She was sold to Qatar National Navigation & Transport Co. of Sharjah in 1979 and briefly renamed Qatar 1 before it was changed to Rashidah by her owner. On 21st May 1987, during a voyage from Umm Said to Kuwait she was attacked and damaged by Iranian gunboats 45 miles off Ras al Khafi. She was later repaired at Kuwait where she arrived on 23rd May. In 1992 operations were transferred to subsidiary company Marco Shipping of Dubai with Marwan Shipping & trading Co. of Kingstown, Grenadines as managers. She was acquired by Queen Navigation Co. of Kingstown in 1996 and renamed Karim. At the beginning of 2002 it appears that she is no longer trading.

COTSWOLD PRINCE was built in 1970 by Clelands Shipbuilding Co. at Wallsend with a tonnage of 1459grt, a length of 285ft, a beam of 47ft 6in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. Sister of the Malvern Prince she was completed in December 1970. In 1979 she was sold to the Reef Shipping Agencies of Gibraltar and renamed Fijian. Her owners chartered her out in 1981 as the Onehunga and she reverted to Fijian when she came off charter in 1983. She was transferred to Suva in 1985 when she came under the ownership of the Blackfoot Shipping Ltd. In 1990 she was renamed Cotswold Prince in by Blackfoot Shipping and registry was transferred to New Zealand. She was acquired by L. D. Marine & Ship Repairs Pty of Launceston with L. D. Shipping as managers and at the beginning of 2002 is still trading. (Photo: John Clarkson Collection)

SAXON PRINCE (4) was built in 1971 by E. J. Smit & Zoon’s Scheeps at Westerbroek with a tonnage of 1581grt, a length of 262ft 1in, a beam of 39ft 4in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was launched in March 1971 as the Cairntrader for the Cairn Line with Shaw, Saville & Albion as managers but completed as the Saxon Prince for Prince Line under the same management. In 1975 she reverted to Cairntrader and then back to Saxon Prince in 1976 before she was sold to Van Nievelt, Goudriaan & Co. B. V. of Rotterdam who renamed her Adara. She was sold in 1986 to Waterdrive Marine of Cyprus who renamed her Andara and in 1990 to Interfront Shipping Ltd of Cyprus who operated her as the Parana Star. In 1992 she was acquired by Astarte Shipping Ltd of Cyprus and managed by Humber Agency A. B. of Malmo as the Pamela. On 8th February 1995 she was arrested for non payment of port dues when she anchored at Falmouth. In the following year she was purchased by Ship Depot Ltd of St. Vincent & Grenadines, given a red hull and renamed Arana. In 1997 she was renamed Karim 1 when acquired by the Elreedy Shipping Co. of Belize and in 2001 was still trading but with undisclosed owners. (Photo: World Ship Society)

NORDIC PRINCE was built in 1971 by E. J. Smit & Zoon’s Scheeps at Westerbroek with a tonnage of 1587grt, a length of 262ft 2in, a beam of 39ft 4in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Saxon Prince she was completed as the Bretwalda for Hall Brothers Steam Ship Co. of Newcastle in June 1971. She was chartered to Prince Line as the Nordic Prince in 1976 and reverted to Bretwalda when she came off charter in 1978. In 1979 she was sold to Downlands Shipping Inc. of Monrovia who renamed her Lady Sarah. On 28th May 1984, during a voyage from Antwerp to Algiers, she caught fire off Cape Caxine and was abandoned. She was towed to Algiers and was scuttled by the Port Authority still ablaze.

TUDOR PRINCE (5) was built in 1969 by Gebrudder Van Diepen at Waterhuizen with a tonnage of 1400grt, a length of 263ft 1in, a beam of 39ft 4in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Saxon Prince she was completed as the Lise Nielsen in September 1969 for D/D A/S Progress of Copenhagen with M. Nielsen as manager. She was chartered to Prince Line as the Tudor Prince in January 1974. On 17th February 1974, during a voyage from London to Limassol, she hit the rocks at the entrance to Valetta harbour and sank in shallow water. Raised on 4th December she remained in Malta for four months while repairs were completed and then sold to Sea Malta Ltd. who renamed her Bormla. In 1984 she was sold to the Norwegian Trans Shipping Ltd of Nassau who and changed her name to Cariwood Lilian and in 1986 to Arne O. Steen Shipping of the Cayman Islands who renamed her Steen Falcon. Two years later she became the Serena when acquired by the Stadion Marine Co. of Valetta and Sandra G when purchased by the Olivine Shipping Co. of Cyprus in 1989. On 17th July 1991, during a voyage to Puerto de Santa Maria she caught fire in the engine room and was towed to Cadiz. Declared a total loss she left on 8th August under tow and bound for Portugal where she was scrapped.

BRITISH PRINCE (4) was built in 1971 by Gebrudder Van Diepen at Waterhuizen with a tonnage of 1560grt, a length of 262ft 3in, a beam of 39ft 4in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Tudor Prince she was completed as the White Crest for Hall Brothers Steam Ship Co. of Newcastle in August 1971. In 1972 she was chartered to Prince Line as the British Prince but reverted to her original name in the following year when she came off charter. She was sold to Agenzia Marittima Albioni SrL of Viareggio and renamed Vagero in 1979. In 1990 her owners were recorded as being Societa Marittima Flegea SnC of Viareggio and in 1990 she was trading as the Bars for B.A.R.S. Nav. Co. of Kingstown in the Grenadines. She was purchased by Abdullah Trabolsi of Tripoli, Syria in 1995 and renamed Siadik. In the following year she was acquired by unnamed Hondurian owners who renamed her Osman J. and thereafter all trace of her was lost.

PENNINE PRINCE/SAILOR PRINCE (4)/SOLDIER PRINCE (3) was built in 1971 by N.V. Isselwerf at Rotterdam with a tonnage of 1599grt, a length of 281ft 11in, a beam of 45ft 5in and a service speed of 16 knots. Prince Line’s only twin funnelled ship was completed as the Pennine Prince in July 1971 with Pacific Maritime Services as registered owner and Shaw, Saville & Albion as managers. She was renamed Sailor Prince in 1972 and Soldier Prince in 1977. In 1979 she was sold to Unicorn Ocean Shipping of Monrovia with Intershipping Management Ltd of London as managers and renamed Alfa. She was acquired by Wandia Nav. Co. of London in 1984 who changed her name to Phaedra for management by G. Frangoulis. Her name was changed to Transporter in 1987 by her owners and on 14th September of that year she was damaged by fire off Piraeus. On 19th November she left under tow for Aliaga where she was broken up. (Photo: Laurence Dunn Collection)

TROJAN PRINCE (4) was built in 1966 by Schiffswerf Heinrich Brand A.G. at Oldeburg with a tonnage of 999grt, a length of 260ft 10in, a beam of 40ft 11in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. She was built as the Lockflethersand for Parten Reederei Lockflethersand of Brake with Sielwall-Reederei H. Renzel K. G. as managers. In 1971 she was sold to Helmut Meyer of Brake and in December of that year to A. H. Basse & Co. of Copenhagen who renamed her Per Basse. Acquired by the Cybas Shipping Co. of Limassol and renamed Daneriver in 1972 she was chartered to Prince Line as the Trojan Prince in 1973. In the following year she was sold to Contimar Zonder & Schiecher A.G. of Hamburg who changed her name to Conti Misr. By 1981 she was trading as the Sail II for Ali Salim & Partners of Kyrenia under the Turkish flag. She was renamed Roule by her owners in 1985. On 23rd July 1985 she was extensively burnt amidships when she was hit by a shell from an Israeli warship when berthed at Sidon. On completion of her repairs she emerged as the Sail II but was later renamed Palmyra with Beirut as her Port of Registry. In 1993 she was renamed Abeer-S when acquired by the Samin Shipping Co. of Latakia, Syria and in the following year her name was changed to Al-Haji Amneh when she was sold to the Al Amin Shipping Co. of Tartous, Syria. According to the 2001 Shipwatch Directory she is no longer trading.

SARACEN PRINCE was built in 1975 by J. J. Sietas GmbH at Hamburg with a tonnage of 999grt, a length of 267ft, a beam of 44ft 7in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. She was launched in 1975 as the Komet for Reederei ‘Komet’ with Henry Gerdau of Hamburg as manager and on completion she was chartered as the Saracen Prince to Prince Line. In the following year she came off charter and reverted to Komet. She was chartered out again in 1979 as the Bourgogne. In 1989 she was acquired by Heino Behrmann of Hamburg and renamed Heinrich Behrmann. She is still trading with that name for Stuewe & Co Schiffahrts GmbH & Co. KG.

TROJAN PRINCE (5) was built in 1976 by B. V. Bodeswas Scheeps at Martenshoek with a tonnage of 1140grt, a length of 258ft 6in, a beam of 43ft and a service speed of 12 knots. Launched on 3rd February 1976 as the Inge Danielsen for Otto Danielsen. Red. D/S A/S Progress of Copenhagen she was chartered to Prince Line on completion as the Trojan Prince. In 1977 she came off charter and reverted to her original name. She was transferred to K/S Inge Progress and renamed Inge Progress in 1987 under the same ownership. In 1989 she was sold to Golden Banner Shipping S. A. of Panama and renamed Golden Banner for management by P. T. Lumintu Sinar Perkasa. She is still trading with that name and ownership.

STUART PRINCE (6) was built in 1972 by Schiffswerf Korneuburg A/S at Korneuburg with a tonnage of 1000grt, a length of 296ft 7in, a beam of 48ft 5in and a service speed of 14 knots. One of five sisters she was built as the Joachim for Peter Dohle’s Partenreederei MS ‘Joachim’ of Hamburg. Acquired by Hans Bielken of Brake in 1975 she was renamed Atlantic Duke and in 1977 she was chartered to Prince Line as the Stuart Prince. She came off charter in 1979 and reverted to her original name until 1981 when she was sold to Rachel Trading & Investment Co. S. A. of Panama who renamed her Mare Pride. Chartered out in 1982 she was renamed Nedlloyd Pride for the duration, reverting to Mare Pride in 1983. In 1984 she was purchased by Reederei Eggers Schiffs K. G. of Panama without a change of name and in 1986 she was transferred to Pride Shipping A/S of Kristiansand, still retaining her name. Her owners changed her name to Sira Ocean in 1988 and in 1990 she became the Gimo Tellus when she was sold to Partenreederei Grotting og Aune of Norway. In 1992 she was renamed Resolute immediately prior to being sold to Marine Partner A/S of Nassau. Two year later she was acquired by Olga Shipping International Corp. of Panama, one of ten single ship companies managed by H. Glahr & Co. GmbH of Bremen, and renamed Olga 1. She is currently trading as the Olga 1 for the Tarron Sea Line Ltd of Lithuania.

HIGHLAND PRINCE (6) was built in 1972 by Santierul Naval Galatz at Galatz with a tonnage of 2943grt, a length of 348ft, a beam of 48ft 4in and a service speed of 14 knots. She was completed as the Pitria Sky for the Pitria Sky Navigation Co. of Pireaus and chartered to Prince Line as the Highland Prince in 1977. In the following year she reverted to her original name when she came off charter. She was sold to Pacific International Lines (Pte) of Singapore in 1980 when she was renamed Kota Angkasa. Ten years later, in 1990, she was acquired by Eagle King Shipping & trading Co. S.A. of Singapore who changed her name to Eagle King. She was sold again in 1992 to Hai Hong Maritime Co. of Panama when her name was changed to Hai Hong 3. On 11th June 1993 she sailed from Singapore to ride out an approaching typhoon and was never seen again.

CROWN PRINCE (3) was built in 1979 by Swan, Hunter (Shipbuilders) Ltd at Walker-on-Tyne with a tonnage of 1599grt, a length of 341ft 11in, a beam of 54ft 3in and a service speed of 15 knots. A container ship, she was launched for Prince Line on 16th October 1978 with Furness, Withy as managers. One of a pair she entered service in March 1979 and, with her sister, had a light blue waterline. In March 1980 she was taken over by C. Y. Tung and in 1983 transferred to Manchester Liners as the Manchester Crown. She was sold to Plenitrade Shipping Inc. of Monrovia in 1985 and renamed Thai Amber. Three years later she became the OOCL Advance of Orient Overseas Container Line Ltd of Hong Kong and in 1993 the HMM Advance of Benton Shipping Ltd with OOCL as managers. According to Shipwatch Directory 2001 she appears to be no longer trading.

ROYAL PRINCE (5) was built in 1979 by Swan, Hunter (Shipbuilders) Ltd at Walker-on-Tyne with a tonnage of 1599grt, a length of 341ft 11in, a beam of 54ft 3in and a service speed of 15 knots. Sister of the Crown Prince she was launched on 17th October 1978 and entered service in the following September. In March 1980 she was taken over by C. Y. Tung and in 1984 she was chartered to Ellerman Lines as the City of Oporto for the Ellerman-Prince service to the Mediterranean. Ten ships were involved operating a service every ten days, five sailing from Ellesmere Port and five sailing from Hull. She reverted to Royal Prince when she was replaced in 1985 and immediately sold to Gainset Shipping Inc. of Monrovia who renamed her Thai Jade. In 1989 she was sold to Orient Overseas Container Line Ltd of Hong Kong and her name was changed to OOCL Ambition. She was acquired by the Host Shipping Ltd of Panama, part of the Wah Tung Shipping Agency Co. of Hong Kong, in 1993 and renamed Host Ambition. According to Shipwatch Directory 2001 she appears to be no longer trading. (Photo: JK Byass)

J. GARDINER & CO./RIO-CAPE LINE LTD

ARISAIG was built in 1882 by Blackwood & Gordon (later to become Clyde Shipbuilders Co.) at Port Glasgow with a tonnage of 1328grt, a length of 240ft 4in, a beam of 33ft 1in and a service speed of 8 knots. She was completed for James Gardiner & Co. in May 1882. In 1895 she was sold to M & A Dall Orso fu G. of La Spezia and renamed Livietta. When replaced by a ship of the same name in 1899 she was sold to R. Meny & Cie of Antwerp who changed her name to Perseverance. She was acquired by Schultz & Cie of Antwerp 1903 and traded as the Maggie Schultz until July 1907 when she foundered.

LISMORE (1) was built in 1885 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1676grt, a length of 255ft, and a beam of 39ft. She was completed in September 1885 as a three masted sailing ship for James Gardiner & Co. and sold to James Cornfoot & Co. of Glasgow in 1890 with whom she served until May 1906 when she was wrecked.

MOIDART was built in 1878 by Edward Withy & Co. at West Hartlepool with a tonnage of 1360grt, a length of 243ft 8in, a beam of 32ft and a service speed of 9 knots. She was completed for James Gardiner & Co. in September 1878. She was sold to James Cormack & Co. of Leith in 1893 for their Leith – Baltic timber trade. On 9th June 1918 she was torpedoed by UC-77 seven miles off Lyme Regis.

MORVEN (1) was built in 1879 by Edward Withy & Co. at West Hartlepool with a tonnage of 1365grt, a length of 242ft 10in, a beam of 32ft and a service speed of 9 knots. She was completed for James Gardiner & Co. in December 1879. On 2nd May 1890, during a voyage from Sombrero to Stettin with phosphates she was wrecked on St. Kitts in the Caribbean.

GLENELG (1) was built in 1888 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2553grt, a length of 300ft, a beam of 40ft and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was completed in November 1888 for the Western Steam Ship Co. with James Gardiner & Co. as managers. When replaced in 1906 she was sold to Ido Yeizo of Yokohama who renamed her Yahiko Maru. In 1919 she was owned by Kobe Kisen Shinataku K. K. of Amagasaki and she was wrecked in June 1924.

LISMORE (2) was built in 1894 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3529grt, a length of 335ft, a beam of 43ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed in September 1894 for the Indian Steam Ship Co.. Sold to Dall’ Orso & Co. of La Spezia in 1912 she was renamed Colomba. By 1921 she was owned by Lloyd Mediterranean of Genoa with the same name and in 1923 she was broken up in Italy.

MORVEN (2) was built in 1894 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3502grt, a length of 344ft, a beam of 44ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed for the Indian Steam Ship Co. in October 1894 and sold to Itaya Shosen Kabusiki Kaisha of Nishinomiya who renamed her Inaho Maru in 1911. Eleven years later, in January 1922, she was wrecked.

ORWELL was built in 1897 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3789grt, a length of 354ft, a beam of 45ft and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed for the India Steam Ship Co. in August 1897 and sold to Akties Tonsbergs Hvalfangeri of Tonsberg for management by O. Hytton. By 1923 Hans Borge was listed as the manager and she was sold for scrap in 1927.

ORONSAY was built in 1900 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3761grt, a length of 354ft, a beam of 45ft and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Orwell she was completed for the Western Steam Ship Co. in September 1900. On 28th December 1916, during a voyage from Calcutta to Dundee, she was torpedoed by UC-22 forty eight miles south east of Malta. Her master was taken prisoner.

GLENLEE (1) was built in 1904 by Scotts Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 4140grt, a length of 377ft 1in, a beam of 49ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. She commenced trading for the Western Steam Ship Co. under the management of James Gardiner & Co. in November 1904. In 1915, whilst en-route from Barry to Aden with a cargo of coal, she was torpedoed by U-41 sixty seven miles south west of the Wolf Rock.

GLENLYON (1) was built in 1905 by Scotts Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 4149grt, a length of 377ft 1in, a beam of 49ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. She entered service for the Indian Steam Ship Co. with James Gardiner & Co. as managers in August 1905. On 31st March 1913, during a voyage from Delagoa to Karachi she was wrecked on Aldabra Island at the entrance to the Red Sea.

KINCRAIG was built in 1901 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3707grt, a length of 353ft 10in, a beam of 45ft and a service speed of 10 knots. She was built for the Steam Ship Kincraig Co. in November 1901. In 1917 she was sold to the Neptune Steam Navigation Co with Furness, Withy & Co. as managers and renamed Pentland Firth. On 4th September 1918, whilst en-route between Rosario and the Clyde with a cargo grain, she sprang a leak following an explosion which was attributed to sabotage and sank off the mouth of the River Plate.

KINTAIL was built in 1907 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3537grt, a length of 349ft 2in, a beam of 45ft and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Kincraig she was completed in December 1907 for James Gardiner & Co’s Steam Ship Kincraig Co. Ltd. She was acquired by the Neptune Steam Navigation Co. in 1917 and placed under the management of Furness, Withy & Co. with the name Alpine Range. She was sold to B. Buskos of Hydra in 1924 and renamed Akropolis. In the following year she was acquired by Cie. Dens-Ocean Soc. Anon of Antwerp who changed her name to Comte de Flandre. She was broken up at Hendrik ido Ambacht in Holland during 1936.

GLENELG (2)/NORMAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1904 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4160grt, a length of 376ft 10in, a beam of 49ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed for James Gardiner & Co’s Western Steam Ship Co. in November 1904. In 1917 she was acquired with the company by Furness, Withy & Co., their oldest ship, and transferred to the new Rio Cape Line Ltd. She was renamed Norman Prince by the Rio Cape Line in January 1919 but continued to be managed by Furness, Withy & Co. In 1922 she was renamed Constantinos Coutsodontis when she was sold to Coutsodontis & Papanastasopoulo of Syra and broken up in Italy during 1922.

GLENDHU/STUART PRINCE (3) was built in 1905 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4129grt, a length of 376ft 11in, a beam of 49ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Norman Prince she was delivered to James Gardiner & Co. as the Glendhu in December 1905. Acquired by Furness, Withy & Co. in 1917 she was renamed Stuart Prince by the Rio Cape Line Ltd in 1919. In 1922 she was transferred to Prince Line Ltd and in December 1935 was sold for scrap at Hull and subsequently broken up at Danzig.

GLENAFFRIC/SAXON PRINCE (3) was built in 1905 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4144grt, a length of 376ft 11in, a beam of 49ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Norman Prince she was completed in March 1905 as the Glenaffric for James Gardiner & Co. Acquired by Furness, Withy & Co. in 1917 she was renamed Saxon Prince by the Rio Cape Line Ltd in 1919. In 1922 management of the ship was transferred to Prince Line Ltd. She was sold to A/b Naxos of Helsingborg in 1924, renamed Naxos and placed under management of R. Mattson. In 1936 she was acquired by Ignazio Messina & Co. of Genoa and with the name Ogaden was rebuilt to carry passengers to Italian East Africa. On 27th October 1941 she was taken over by the Italian Government and on 12th August 1942 was torpedoed by HMS Porpoise near Ras el Tin in the Red Sea.

GLENDEVON/SAILOR PRINCE (3) was built in 1907 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4169grt, a length of 377ft, a beam of 49ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Norman Prince she was completed in November 1907 as the Glendevon for James Gardiner & Co. and taken over by Furness, Withy & Co. in 1917. During that year she carried the Vickers aircraft in which Allcock & Brown made the first transatlantic flight to Newfoundland. She was renamed Sailor Prince in 1919, placed under the management of Prince Line in 1922 and broken up at Rosyth in March 1936. (Photo: World Ship Society)

GLENSHEIL/HIGHLAND PRINCE (4) was built in 1909 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4798grt, a length of 400ft, a beam of 52ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed as the Glensheil for James Gardiner & Co. in August 1909 and acquired by Furness, Withy & Co. with the rest of the fleet in 1917. Renamed Highland Prince by the Rio Cape Line Ltd in 1919 she was placed under the management of Prince Ltd in 1922. In January 1938 she was sold to P. Lyras of Athens, renamed Orion and, as his only ship, was managed by A. Lusi. On 20th September 1948, during a voyage from Sydney, Cape Breton Island to Botwood with timber, she caught fire after an explosion in the engine room and drifted ashore on Belle Island where she became a total loss. (Photo: A Duncan)

CLENCLUNY was built in 1909 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4812grt, a length of 400ft, a beam of 52ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Highland Prince she was build for James Gardiner & Co’s Western Steam Ship Co. However she never saw service with Furness, Withy or Prince Line as on 27th April 1917, during a voyage from Bombay to Hull, she was torpedoed by UC-67 off Cape Sigli in the Mediterranean with the loss of 4 lives.

GLENORCHY was built in 1909 by Scotts Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4737grt, a length of 400ft, a beam of 52ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Highland Prince she was completed as the Glenorchy for James Gardiner & Co. and taken over by Furness, Withy & Co. in 1917. On 1st March 1920 she stranded on Victoria Bar during a voyage from New York to Victoria, Brazil and was declared a total loss.

GLENETIVE/OCEAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1911 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 5212grt, a length of 410ft 4in, a beam of 52ft 4in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed as the Glenetive for James Gardiner & Co. in September 1911and acquired by Furness, Withy & Co. in 1917. Renamed Ocean Prince in 1919 by the Rio Cape Line, management was transferred to Prince Line Ltd in 1922. She was sold to S. Costanos & Son of Pireaus in 1935 when her name was changed to Germaine. on 15th December 1939 she was torpedoed by U-48 south west of Cape Clear. (Photo: Hildebrand)

GLENSPEAN/WELSH PRINCE (3) was built in 1912 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 5221grt, a length of 410ft 2in, a beam of 52ft 4in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Ocean Prince she was completed as the Glenspean for James Gardiner & Co. in January 1912 and acquired by Furness, Withy & Co. in 1917. Renamed Welsh Prince in 1919 by the Rio Cape Line, management was transferred to Prince Line Ltd in 1922. On 28th May 1922, during a voyage from Astoria to Japan she sunk with the loss of 7 lives after being in collision with America – Hawaiian’s Iowan in the Columbia River.

GLENARTNEY was built in 1911 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 5210grt, a length of 410ft 4in, a beam of 52ft 4in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed for the Caledonian Steam Ship Co. Ltd with James Gardiner as manager. On 18th March 1915, during a voyage from Bangkok to the UK, she was torpedoed by U-34 four miles south of the Sovereign Lightship in the English Channel with the loss of 1 life.

GLENNEVIS/AFRICAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1917 by Ayrshire Dockyard Co. at Irvine with a tonnage of 5119grt, a length of 400ft 8in, a beam of 53ft 5in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was delivered as the Glennevis in May 1917 and taken over by Furness, Withy & Co. with the rest of the fleet for operation by Rio Cape Line Ltd. Renamed African Prince in 1919 by the Rio Cape Line, management was transferred to Prince Line in 1922. She was sold to Counties Ship Management Ltd for operation by the Dorset Steamship Co in 1936.and renamed Pentridge Hill. When World War 2 was declared in 1939 she was purchased by the Board of Trade, with a number of other vessels, as a reserve ship and given the BOT name, Botway. In December 1945 she was loaded in Scotland with surplus shells and ammunition and scuttled in deep waters in the Atlantic. (Photo: A Duncan)

GLENCARRON was built in 1917 by Ayrshire Dockyard Co. at Irvine with a tonnage of 5117grt, a length of 400ft 7in, a beam of 53ft 5in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the African Prince she was delivered as the Glencarron in June 1917 and taken over by Furness, Withy & Co. On 19th February 1918, during a voyage from Philadelphia to London, she was torpedoed by U-82 in the English Channel 47 miles off the Lizard.

GLENLYON (2)/INDIAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1917 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4933grt, a length of 400ft 4in, a beam of 53ft 5in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the African Prince she was completed as the Glenlyon for James Gardiner & Co. in September 1917 and acquired by Furness, Withy & Co.with the rest of the fleet. Renamed Indian Prince in 1919 by the Rio Cape Line, management was transferred to Prince Line Ltd in 1922. In April 1934 she was damaged following a grounding outside Cape Town. In 1936 she was sold to A. I. Cosmas of Panama and renamed Andreas. She was seized by the Japanese in December 1941, when in the Dutch East Indies, renamed Wakatu Maru and placed under the management of Kisen Kabusiki Kaisya of Kobe. On 16th December 1942 she was sunk off East Timor by Dutch aircraft from Darwin. (Photo: FW Hawks)

GLENLEE (2) was built in 1917 by Charles Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4915grt, a length of 400ft 8in, a beam of 53ft 5in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the African Prince she was completed in October 1917 as the Glenlee for the Rio Cape Line Ltd with Furness, Withy & Co. as managers. On 25th June 1918 she escaped from a gunfire attack from a surfaced U-boat but on the following 9th September, during a voyage from the Clyde to Dunkirk, she was torpedoed by UB-57 4 miles off the Owers Lightship in the English Channel with the loss of one life.

CORSICAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1921 by Furness Shipbuilding Co. at Haverton Hill with a tonnage of 3493grt, a length of 363ft 4in, a beam of 52ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. She was completed in December 1921 as the Persiana for Furness, Withy & Co. and in the following year was transferred to the Warren Line of Liverpool and renamed Chickahominy. In 1924 she was transferred to Rio Cape Line Ltd when her name was changed to Corsican Prince. After fourteen years service she was sold in 1938 to Les Cargoes Algeriens Soc. Anon of Algiers who changed her name to Jean et Jacques. When France capitulated in 1940 she was at Algiers and later worked under German control. On 3rd March 1942 she was torpedoed by a British MTBs off Cape Blanc, Bizerta.

SARDINIAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1922 by Furness Shipbuilding Co. at Haverton Hill with a tonnage of 3491grt, a length of 363ft 4in, a beam of 52ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Corsican Prince she was launched in March 1922 as the Egyptiana for Furness, Withy & Co. and completed as the Appomattox for the Warren Line of Liverpool. She was transferred to Rio Cape Line Ltd in 1924 and renamed Sardinian Prince. On 16th March 1941she was part of a convoy which had been ordered to disperse when the German battle cruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau appeared on the scene. The two battle cruisers sank or captured no fewer than sixteen of the unprotected ships and the Sardinian Prince was sunk by the Scharnhorst 500 miles south east of Cape Race. Surviving ships managed to transmit the ‘RRR’ raider warnings and the battle cruisers fled to the safety of Brest in accordance with German policy to minimise fleet losses. On the following day HMS Rodney picked up the survivors. (Photo: A Duncan)

CASTILIAN PRINCE (2)/SICILIAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1922 by Furness Shipbuilding Co. at Haverton Hill with a tonnage of 3489grt, a length of 363ft 4in, a beam of 52ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Corsican Prince she was laid down as the Arabiana for Furness, Withy & Co. and completed in June 1922 as the Alleghany for the Warren Line of Liverpool. In 1923 she was transferred to Rio Cape Line Ltd and renamed Castilian Prince. Her name was changed to Sicilian Prince in 1926 when she was transferred to Prince Line’s Mediterranean services. She was sold to Cie. des Bateaux a Vapeurs ‘Nord’ of Dunkirk who renamed her Alsacien. In 1952 she was acquired by Malic Yolac of Istanbul who changed her name to Yolac. On 11th November 1963 she arrived at Kalafatyea where she was broken up.

JAVANESE PRINCE (1) was built in 1926 by Deutsches Werft A. G. at Hamburg with a tonnage of 6734grt, a length of 441ft 7in, a beam of 60ft 4in and a service speed of 14 knots. Built to the same specification as the Siamese Prince she entered service in January 1926. On 21st May 1941, during a voyage from Cardiff to New York via the north of Ireland, she was torpedoed by U-138 two hundred miles northwest of the Butt of Lewis. (Photo: John Clarkson Collection)

MALAYAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1926 by Deutsches Werft A. G. at Hamburg with a tonnage of 6734grt, a length of 441ft 7in, a beam of 60ft 4in and a service speed of 14 knots. Sister of the Javanese Prince she was completed in March 1926. The only one of her class to survive the Second World War she was broken up at Inverkeithing by Thos. W. Ward in July 1950.
ASIATIC PRINCE (3) was built in 1926 by Deutsches Werft A. G. at Hamburg with a tonnage of 6734grt, a length of 441ft 7in, a beam of 60ft 4in and a service speed of 14 knots. Sister of the Javanese Prince she was completed in April 1926. On 16th March 1928 she sailed from San Pedro, Los Angeles for Yokohama with silver bullion valued at £263,000 and a cargo worth £180,000. Six days later she radioed from a position 1,890 miles from Los Angeles that, because of the weather, she had reduced speed. On 24th March Ellerman’s City of Eastbourne picked up a faint SOS in hurricane weather 200 miles north west of Hawaii. The Asiatic Prince vanished without further trace with the loss of 48 lives. Mysteriously the City of Eastbourne picked up a second SOS but from a call sign P— instead of R—. This possibly indicated the presence of a second ship but as no other vessels were reported missing it is assumed that the Asiatic Prince made an error in her final transmission.

JAPANESE PRINCE (2)/INDIAN PRINCE (4) was built in 1926 by Deutsches Werft A. G. at Hamburg with a tonnage of 6734grt, a length of 441ft 7in, a beam of 60ft 4in and a service speed of 14 knots. Sister of the Javanese Prince she was delivered in May 1926. In 1937 negotiations were commenced to sell her to Butler Wang’s Rederei A/S for management by W. Butler Wang as the Wave but they were never completed. She reverted to Prince Line Ltd as the Indian Prince in 1938. On 3rd September 1943 Italy surrendered and in the following November the Mediterranean was opened to escorted Allied merchantmen. Two months later, on 11th November, during a voyage from Liverpool to Bombay, she was hit by an aerial torpedo dropped by the Luftwaffe 25 miles northwest of Bone, Tunisia. She was taken in tow but later sank.

CHINESE PRINCE (3) was built in 1926 by Deutsches Werft A. G. at Hamburg with a tonnage of 6734grt, a length of 441ft 7in, a beam of 60ft 4in and a service speed of 14 knots. Sister of the Javanese Prince she entered service in June 1926. On 12th June 1941 she was torpedoed by U-552 two hundred and eighty miles north west of Malin Head. (Photo: A Duncan)

CINGALESE PRINCE (1) was built in 1929 by Blythswood Shipbuilding Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 6625grt, a length of 441ft 6in, a beam of 60ft 4in and a service speed of 14 knots. Sister of the Javanese Prince she was completed in July 1929. In April 1941, during the Greek campaign, she was bombed and badly damaged when off Piraeus. Later in the same year, on 20th September, she was torpedoed and sunk by U-111 southwest of Freetown.

BRITISH PRINCE (4) was built in 1935 by Wm. Doxford & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4979grt, a length of 412ft 2in, a beam of 54ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed in January 1935as the Sutherland for B. J. Sutherland of Newcastle, one of a series of economy engined ships from Doxford’s. The economy came about by giving the ships a wider beam, which provided more cargo space, and a slow running engine. Acquired by Furness, Withy & Co. for Rio Cape Line Ltd with Prince Line as managers in 1936 she was renamed British Prince. On 26th September 1941 she was sunk by German bombers off Hornsea as she was approaching the Thames estuary. (Photo: FW Hawks)

SCOTTISH PRINCE (3) was built in 1938 by Blythswood Shipbuilding Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4917grt, a length of 431ft 6in, a beam of 56ft and a service speed of 10 knots. Another economy style ship she was delivered in May 1938. On 17th March 1942 she was torpedoed by U-68 off Cape Palmas in Liberia.

JAVANESE PRINCE (2) was built in 1944 by Blythswood Shipbuilding Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 8879grt, a length of 482ft 4in, a beam of 62ft 1in and a service speed of 15 knots. She was completed in November 1944 for Rio Cape Line Ltd with Furness, Withy & Co. as managers and transferred to Prince Line Ltd in 1954. In 1961 she was sold to Wm. Thomson’s Ben Line and renamed Benlarig. On 6th September 1969 she arrived at Hong Kong where she was broken up by the Leung Yau Shipbreaking Co. (Photo: Mersey Photos)

WELSH PRINCE (6) was built in 1944 by Wm. Doxford & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 7381grt, a length of 444ft 10in, a beam of 56ft 6in and a service speed of 11.5 knots. She was a standard ‘C’ type vessel completed in Sept 1944 for Rio Cape Line with Furness Withy as Managers and transferred to Furness Withy ownership in 1954. She was sold to Vergocean Steam Ship Co. of London in 1961 and renamed Vergmont. On 23rd February 1971 she arrived at Whampoa where she was broken up.

EMPIRE REGENT/BLACK PRINCE (3) was built in 1943 by Furness Shipbuilding Co. at Haverton Hill with a tonnage of 9904grt, a length of 497ft 6in, a beam of 64ft 5in and a service speed of 15 knots. The second ship of twelve ‘Fast’ standards she was launched on 17th July 1943 as the Empire Regent for the Ministry of War Transport. When she was completed and delivered on 25th November she was placed under the management of T & J Brocklebank. In 1945 management was transferred to Furness, Withy & Co. and she was allocated to Rio Cape Line Ltd. On 13th August 1946 she was acquired by Rio Cape Line Ltd and renamed Black Prince. Three years later, on 19th May 1949, she was transferred to Shaw, Saville & Albion who renamed her Zealandic. She was sold on 3rd October 1952 to Canadian Pacific Steamships of Liverpool who renamed her Beaverlodge and on 16th March 1960 to Wm. Thomson’s Ben Line who changed her name to Benhiant. On 15th April 1970 she was acquired by Witty Cia. Naviera S. A. of Limassol, renamed Venus and on 14th July 1971 arrived at Koahsuing in Taiwan where she was broken up by Chuang Kuo Steel & Iron Works. (Photo: World Ship Society)

MALAYAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1945 by Bethlehem Fairfield Shipyard at Baltimore with a tonnage of 7698grt, a length of 455ft 2in, a beam of 62ft 1in and a service speed of 14 knots. She was completed for the US War Shipping Administration as the Tusculum Victory and bare boat chartered to the Ministry of War Transport with Furness, Withy & Co. as managers. As such she was one of 97 ships converted into troopships for 1,547 men. In 1947 she was acquired by Furness & Withy & Co. from the Ministry of Transport and renamed Pacific Stronghold. Transferred to Rio Cape Line Ltd in 1954 she was renamed Malayan Prince but remained under Furness, Withy ownership. In 1959 she was sold to Marine Bulk Carriers Inc. of New York who changed her name first to Wang Knight and then to Marine Carrier. In the following year she was purchased by the Elie Shipping Corp. of New York who renamed her Elie V and four year later she became the Oceanic Wave when she was acquired by the Oceanic Pioneer Steam Ship Co. of Cleveland, Ohio. Her last owner was the Oswego Shipping Co. Inc of Cleveland who named her Silver Falcon in 1969 and in February of the following year she was broken up at Kaohsuing in Taiwan. (Photo: A Duncan)

BRITISH PRINCE (5) was built in 1945 by Bethlehem Fairfield Shipyard at Baltimore with a tonnage of 7681grt, a length of 455ft 2in, a beam of 62ft 1in and a service speed of 14 knots. Sister of the Malayan Prince she was completed as the Stamford Victory for the US War Shipping Administration. Built as a troopship she was bareboat chartered to the Ministry of Transport in 1946 and placed under the management of Furness, Withy & Co. In 1948 she was acquired by Prince Line Ltd and renamed British Prince for operation by Rio Cape Line Ltd. She was transferred to Furness, Withy & Co. in 1954 and in 1957 was chartered to T & J Brocklebank for a two year period as the Mandagala. In 1960 she was sold Orient Mid-East Great Lake Services Inc. of Piraeus and renamed Orient Trader. On 21st July she caught fire whilst discharging a cargo of rubber at Toronto and was towed out and beached on Ward Island. Total gutted she was sold for scrap and on 7th July 1966 arrived at Valencia in tow of Praia da Adragal.

The company history has been extracted from –
“Pride of the Princes” by Norman Middlemiss
The ship histories have been taken from –
Merchant Fleets-Manchester Liners, Houlders, Alexander, Prince & Rio Cape Lines by Duncan Haws