History of the Merchant Navy
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BELGIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1888 by Ailsa Shipbuilding Co. at Troon with a tonnage of 1266grt, a length of 231ft 2in, a beam of 33ft 2in and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was completed as the Lady Ailsa for J & A Wylie of London and acquired by James Knott in 1890. In 1897 she was sold to F.H. Powell & Co. of London who renamed her Hopeful. On 13th February 1902 she was lost off the Longships Light following a collision during a voyage from Liverpool to Plymouth.

KAFFIR PRINCE was built in 1891 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2228grt, a length of 292ft 6in, a beam of 38ft 7in and a service speed of 10 knots. She entered service in December 1891 and started a trend whereby ships were built with a clipper bow. In 1919 she was sold to Pandelis Bros. of Piraeus and renamed Propontis. Five years later she was transferred to Pandelis Bros. Ltd. of London and the British flag without a change of name. In 1926 she was sold to Mrs Zeinabbent Khalil Mourad el Geretly of Alexandria and in 1928 was renamed Nafe by Mohamed Effendi Nafe, also of Alexandria. She was broken up in 1933 at Thomas Cook’s old works at Boulac, Alexandria. (Photo: Laurence Dunn Collection)

CREOLE PRINCE was built in 1893 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2047grt, a length of 282ft, a beam of 37ft 8in and a service speed of 10 knots. Completed in May 1893 she was transferred to Prince Line (1895) Ltd in 1895. On 21st October 1916 she sank six miles west of Cape Spartel, Morocco after being in collision with HMS Narcissus in fog. (Photo: York)

CARIB PRINCE was built in 1893 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2048grt, a length of 282ft, a beam of 37ft 8in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Creole Prince she was, on completion, deployed on the Mediterranean to New York service. Transferred to Prince Line Ltd in 1898 she remained with the company until 1922 when she was sold to J.S. Coulis of Pireaus and renamed Fani. In the following year she was acquired by A.D. Tchirkovitch of Istanbul who renamed her Mikhail Archangel. She was sold again in 1926 to Barzilay & Benjamin of Istanbul who initially renamed her Choule and then corrected it to Sule. Two years later she was sold to T.C. Munakalat Vekeleti Denizollari ve Liman I.U.M. of Istanbul and by 1950 she was no longer listed in Lloyds Register.

EGYPTIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1879 by M. Pearse & Co. at Stockton with a tonnage of 1910grt, a length of 275ft, a beam of 35ft 6in and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was built as the Argosy for the United Steam Shipping Co. of London and managed by J. Temperley & Co. which was the remnants of the Temperley Line (British Colonial Steamship Co.) She was one of three United ships acquired by James Knott in 1893 and renamed Egyptian Prince. Transferred to Prince Line Ltd in 1898 she was sold in 1900 to E. Bozzo of Genoa who renamed her Luigino. In 1908 she was sold to F. Suarez of Heulva for use as an iron ore carrier and renamed San Fernando. On 14th April 1911 she foundered in the Bay of Biscay during a voyage to Garston.

SARDINIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1882 by C.S. Swan & Hunter at Newcastle with a tonnage of 2453grt, a length of 317ft, a beam of 38ft and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was built as the Brookfield for the United Steam Shipping Co. of London and managed by J. Temperley & Co. which was the remnants of the Temperley Line (British Colonial Steamship Co.) She was one of three United ships acquired by James Knott in 1893 and renamed Sardintian Prince. In 1901 she was sold to Akties. ‘Carl’. with George T. Monsen as manager and renamed Carl. Three years later, in 1904, she was acquired by K. Kishimoto of Hamadera and renamed Shinko Maru. On 17th June 1912 she was wrecked on Rebun Island, Hokkaido.

TURKISH PRINCE was built in 1879 by Charles Mitchell & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 1986grt, a length of 286ft, a beam of 35ft 1in and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was built as the Inchmornish for Hamilton, Fraser & Co. of Liverpool and purchased by the United Steam Shipping Co. in 1890, renamed Briggella and managed by J. Temperley & Co. which was the remnants of the Temperley Line (British Colonial Steamship Co.) She was one of three United ships acquired by James Knott in 1893 and renamed Turkish Prince. On 16th September 1897 she was wrecked on the Yucatan Peninsular during a voyage from Genoa to Vera Cruz.

IMPERIAL PRINCE (1) was built in 1890 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2525grt, a length of 293ft 6in, a beam of 40ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Completed in July 1890 she was transferred to Prince Line (1895) Ltd on 28th February 1895. In 1913 she was sold to Hine Bros. of Maryport for operation by the The Holme Line Steamship Co. as the Myrtle Holme. She was acquired by Goshi Kaisha Kishimoto Shokai of Kishimoto in February 1915 and renamed Yeirako Maru. On 11th April 1915 she was wrecked on Amherst Rocks in the China Sea.

SPANISH PRINCE (1) was built in 1882 by Hodgson & Soulsby at Blyth with a tonnage of 1783grt, a length of 265ft, a beam of 36ft 1in and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was built as the Castlehill for Tomlinson, Thomson & Co. of Liverpool and by 1886 was owned by the Castlehill Steamship Co. of Liverpool with James Little & Co. as managers. In 1888 the company was sold to R.H. Wesencraft & Co. of Newcastle who retained her name. Acquired by James Knott in 1892 and renamed Spanish Prince she was sold three years later to A Bianchi fu M of Spezia who changed her name to Buenos Aires. In 1902 she was acquired by P. Lagomaggiore fu L of Genoa and managed by O. Macera as the Tigullio. Four years later she was owned by D & E Fratelli Bozzo of Genoa and operating as the Espero. Without any change of name she was sold to Conti, Giorgi & Co. in 1912 and to Luigi Ghirardi of Genoa in 1914. After a further ten years service she was broken up in 1924.

CASTILIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1893 by C.S. Swan & Hunter at Newcastle with a tonnage of 2316grt, a length of 290ft 7in, a beam of 38ft 8in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was built for the Prince Steam Shipping Co. On 27th December 1899 she was damaged after being in collision with the Amphitrite in the Rio Parana. She was sold to Booker Bros. of Liverpool in 1912 and renamed Amakura. On 12th June 1917, during a voyage from Liverpool to Demerara, she was torpedoed by U-94 west of Tory Island with the loss of 2 lives.

BEA BELLIDO/SYRIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1893 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 1914grt, a length of 277ft, a beam of 37ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed as the Bea Bellido for Prince Steam Shipping Co. and renamed Syrian Prince in 1896. In 1910 she was sold to Cia. Marittima Siciliana of Messina who renamed her Suez and two years later to Charilaos, Goudis of Piraeus who changed her name to Epaminondas and placed her under the management of N. Goudis. By 1916 she was trading as the Marie Carossi and on 20th November of that year she capsized and sank. (Photo: York)

MEXICAN PRINCE was built in 1893 by C.S. Swan & Hunter at Newcastle with a tonnage of 3028grt, a length of 328ft 4in, a beam of 41ft and a service speed of 10 knots. She was an oil tanker delivered in September 1893 and which remained with the company until 1919 when she was sold to the Southern Whaling & Sealing Co. of Liverpool who renamed her Southern Isles. In 1930 she was sold to Cia de Combustivels de Lobito of Lobitos for use as an oil depot ship at that port and later at Lisbon with the name Silva Porto. She was sold to Thos. W. Ward in 1937 and in January of the following year was towed to Pembroke Dock where she was broken up.

GEORGIAN PRINCE was built in 1893 by Sir W.G. Armstrong, Whitworth & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 3245grt, a length of 328ft 4in, a beam of 41ft and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Mexican Prince she was delivered in November 1893 and stayed with the company until May 1918 when she was sold to Anglo-Iranian Oil Co’s British Tanker Co. and renamed British General. In 1922 she was sold to Cia Vasco Valenciana de Nav. of Bilboa, renamed Ebros and later used as a depot ship. She was broken up in Spain during 1940.

CHINESE PRINCE (1) was built in 1883 by Edward Withy & Co. at West Hartlepool with a tonnage of 2111grt, a length of 285ft 4in, a beam of 36ft and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed in September 1883 as the China for the City of Liverpool Steam Navigation Co. and was the sister of Furness Withy’s Newcastle City. In 1889 she was transferred to Belfast Shipowners Co. and purchased by James Knott in 1893 and renamed Chinese Prince. Two years later she was acquired by Bertollo & Vaccaro of Genoa and renamed Concordia. In 1906 she was sold to T. Gazzolo fu A. of Genoa and renamed Concezione. On 19th November 1916 she foundered 12 miles off Puerta Ventura.

TUSCAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1881 by M Pearse & Co. at Stockton with a tonnage of 1653grt, a length of 260ft 4in, a beam of 33ft 8in and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was completed in June 1881as the Miranda for Herskind & Woods of West Hartlepool and acquired by James Knott in 1893 who renamed her Tuscan Prince. In 1906 she was sold to P. Schiaffino fu G.B. of Genoa and renamed Provvidenza. On 11th November 1908 she developed a leak and was abandoned off Cape Villano during a voyage from Cardiff to Tunis with a cargo of coal.

TARTAR PRINCE (1) was built in 1895 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 3272grt, a length of 342ft 8in, a beam of 43ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Delivered in January 1895 she was advertised as having a ‘saloon amidship, bathrooms, electric light’ and commenced her maiden voyage on 26th September from London to Buenos Aires via Montevideo and Rosario. On 27th February 1897 she made her final voyage on that route before sailing from Newcastle to New York to commence the New York – Naples – Genoa – Livorno service. In July 1902 she was transferred to the New York – South Africa service. On 25th November 1902, on only her second voyage on that route, she caught fire and was lost during a voyage from New York to East London.

TROJAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1896 by J. Readhead & Sons at South Shields with a tonnage of 3273grt, a length of 351ft 4in, a beam of 44ft 7in and a service speed of 10 knots. Launched on the 14th May 1896 she commenced her maiden voyage from London to Buenos Aires via Montevideo and Rosario on 30th July. She made her final sailing on that route on 16th February 1897 before commencing the New York – Naples – Genoa – Livorno service, completing 6 round voyages annually. On 25th May 1903 she made her final sailing from Genoa to New York during which she had to put into Gibraltar with a damaged propeller. With the need for a replacement her steerage passengers were transferred to the Sicilian Prince and she was towed to Marseilles. On 23rd February 1917 she was torpedoed by U-395 off Cape Shershel with the loss of two lives whilst bound for Alexandria.

SPARTAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1899 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 3299grt, a length of 351ft, a beam of 44ft 6in and a service speed of 10 knots. Completed for Prince Steam Shipping Company she was incorporated into the Prince Line Ltd and deployed on the New York to Italy service. On 29th August 1908 she was lost after colliding with a barque during a voyage from New York to the River Plate.

LANCASTRIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1881 by Palmers Co.. at Jarrow with a tonnage of 1747grt, a length of 262ft, a beam of 35ft 2in and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was completed in July 1881 as the Lancaster for Steam Ship Lancaster Co. of Liverpool with G.M. Steeves as manager. Acquired in 1893 she was renamed Lancastrian Prince. On 22nd September 1895 during a voyage to Kingston she was lost on Morant Cays.

ITALIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1893 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 3083grt, a length of 338ft 11in, a beam of 42ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed in September 1893 and remained with the company until 10th November 1920 when she was destroyed by fire at Limassol. Although beached she was declared a total loss.

PORTUGUESE PRINCE (1) was built in 1881 by Andrew Leslie & Co. at Hebburn with a tonnage of 2179grt, a length of 320ft, a beam of 35ft 10in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed in January 1881 as the Saint Dunstan for the British & Foreign Steamship Co. with Rankin & Gilmour & Co.as managers. Bought by James Knott and renamed Portuguese Prince in 1893 she remained with Prince Line until 1900 when she was sold to E. Morteo fu A of Genoa who changed her named to Monte Rosa. In the following year she was acquired by C. Marchesa of Genoa who renamed her Luigia. On 21st March 1904 she was wrecked on Penal Point in Corsica during a voyage from Novorossisk to Marseilles.

ASTURIAN PRINCE was built in 1893 by John Readhead & Sons. at South Shields with a tonnage of 3301grt, a length of 336ft, a beam of 42ft and a service speed of 10 knots. In June 1895 she was damaged following a grounding near Curacao and after being salvaged was sold cheaply to Thomas Hogan’s Miami Steamship Co. of New York. and renamed Matteawan. During 1898 she was chartered to the US Government for deployment during the war with Spain. In 1899 she was placed on the New York to Galveston to competed with the more powerful Mallory Steamship Co. but the venture was not a success. She was sold to the Saginaw Steel Co. in 1900 for management by J. H. Starin. On 2nd December 1901 she sailed from Nanaimo with a cargo of coal and was never seen again.

AFGHAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1894 by Robert Stephenson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 3261grt, a length of 344ft 7in, a beam of 43ft 1in and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was completed in 1894 for the Prince Line Steam Shipping Insurance Association and transferred to Prince Line Ltd in 1898. In the following year she was sold to R.P. Houston & Co and renamed Hilarius. In 1919 she was acquired by N.G. Livanos of Piraeus who renamed her Livanos. On 27th August 1923 she was wrecked on Perduto Island in the Strait of Bonifacio during a voyage from Follonica in Italy to Hamburg.

SPANISH PRINCE (2) was built in 1886 by R & W Hawthorn, Leslie & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 3109grt, a length of 353ft, a beam of 39ft 5in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was launched on 20th April 1886 as the Port Pirie for Wm. Milburn’s Anglo-Australasian Steam Navigation Co. and chartered to Allport & Hughes. Acquired by Prince Steam Shipping Company and renamed Spanish Prince in 1897 she was transferred to Prince Line Ltd in 1898 and placed on the Black Sea and Levant trade. In 1900 she was sold to Cia. Cantabrica de Nav. of Bilbao with Orbe & Gorbeo as managers and renamed Guernica. On 10th February 1902 she foundered in the Bay of Biscay during a voyage from Cardiff to Genoa.

CYPRIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1878 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 1888grt, a length of 274ft 6in, a beam of 36ft and a service speed of 9.5 knots. Completed as the Cyprus for Taylor & Sanderson Ltd. of Sunderland she was sold to Thos. Ronaldson & Co. of London for operation by their Sunniside Steam Ship Co. Thos. Ronaldson & Co. was formerly known as Adamson & Ronaldson until J. W. Adamson retired and traded as the Puritan Line. The Cyprus traded between Antwerp and Boston until replaced by the English King in 1899. She was acquired by Prince Line in 1899 and renamed Cyprian Prince. On 31st July 1908 she was wrecked at Farilhoes in Portugal whilst in fog.

DUTCH PRINCE was built in 1894 by Russell & Co. at Port Glasgow with a tonnage of 4992grt, a length of 396ft, a beam of 48ft 8in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed as the Strathgarry for Burrell & Son of Glasgow and acquired by Prince Line Ltd in 1899. The company’s largest ship at the time she was renamed Dutch Prince. In 1900 she was sold to Andrew Weir & Co. for operation by the Steam Ship Wyneric Co. Ltd as the Wyneric. On 15th April 1913 she sailed from Baltimore bound for Guayaquil with a cargo of coal and dynamite. She passed the Triton Bank in the Straits of Magellan on 10th May and was never seen again.

SAXON PRINCE (2) was built in 1899 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 3471grt, a length of 352ft 7in, a beam of 45ft 7in and a service speed of 10 knots. Built for Prince Line Ltd she entered service in July 1899. On 25th February 1916 she was captured by the German auxiliary cruiser Mowe 620 miles west of Fastnet and sunk with explosives. The Mowe was on her first operation and had already laid 252 mines off the Pentland Firth, one of which sank the battleship HMS Edward VII. The Saxon Prince was the 15th and last victim of that first operation.

NORMAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1900 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 3464grt, a length of 274ft 6in, a beam of 36ft and a service speed of 9.5 knots. Sister of the Saxon Prince she was delivered to Prince Line Ltd in May 1900. In 1920 she was sold to G. Coulouras of Hydra, renamed Hydra and broken up In Italy during April 1933.

SAILOR PRINCE (2) was built in 1901 by Wm. Dobson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 3119grt, a length of 331ft 6in, a beam of 44ft 3in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed for Prince Line Ltd with James Knott as manager in September 1901. On 2nd October 1915, during a voyage from Cyprus to Leith, she was sunk by gunfire from U-39 when 36 miles from Cape Sidero in Crete with the loss of 2 lives. (Photo: World Ship Society)

SOLDIER PRINCE (2) was built in 1901 by Wm. Dobson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 3118grt, a length of 331ft 6in, a beam of 44ft 3in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Sailor Prince she entered service in December 1901 and remained with the company until June 1932 when she was broken up by Smith & Houston at Port Glasgow. (Photo: FW Hawks)

MERCHANT PRINCE (2) was built in 1902 by Wm. Dobson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 3092grt, a length of 331ft 6in, a beam of 44ft 3in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Sailor Prince she was delivered in January 1902. In 1922 she was sold to F. Lyras of Chios, renamed Lyras and was broken up in February 1936 by Van Heyghen Freres at Ghent.

EGYPTIAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1902 by Blyth Shipbuilding Co. at Blyth with a tonnage of 3096grt, a length of 330ft 6in, a beam of 44ft 3in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Sailor Prince she was completed for Prince Line Ltd. On 12th May 1917, during a voyage from Alexandria to Manchester, she was captured and sunk with Explosives by U-38 when 250 miles southeast of Malta.

NAPOLITAN PRINCE was built in 1889 by Scott & Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 3198grt, a length of 363ft 6in, a beam of 42ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was launched in August 1889 as the Rei de Portugal for the Mala Real Portugueza’s mail service to Portugal’s African colonies. When she entered service in February 1890 the route was not a success as she was competing against Cia Nacional. In 1902 she was acquired by Prince Line for the Livorno-Genoa-Naples- Palermo-New York service and renamed Napolitan Prince. After nine years service she was sold to Cie. de Navigation Mixte of Marseilles in November 1911 and renamed Manouba. She was subsequently modernised and continued with Mixte until 14th February 1929 when she was sold for demolition in Italy.

SICILIAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1889 by Scott & Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 3199grt, a length of 363ft 6in, a beam of 42ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Napolitan Prince she was launched in November 1889 as the Mocambique for Mala Real Portugeza. Like her sister, when she entered service in March 1900 she failed to compete with the Cia. Nacional and in 1902 was sold to W. MacAndrew of Lisbon who renamed her Alvarez Cabral. MacAndrew’s sold her immediately to Prince Line for their Livorno-Genoa-Naples-Palermo-New York service and on 30th September 1902 commenced her first sailing as the Sicilian Prince. She began her final sailing on 18th March 1908 before being chartered to Northwest Transport on 12th December for whom she made four round voyages from Rotterdam to New York with a call at Halifax. In June 1910 she was sold to Khedivial Steam Ship & Graving Dock Co. of London and was renamed Abbassieh for management by Lord Edward Hamilton. After a further twenty one years service she was broken up in Italy during 1931.

TUDOR PRINCE (2) was built in 1903 by Sunderland Shipbuilding Co. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4208grt, a length of 360ft, a beam of 48ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Entering service in January 1903 she remained with the company until 1923 when she was sold to N. Th. Bulgaris & Partners of Andros who renamed her Theodoros Bulgaris. On 31st December she was on a voyage from Constanza to Hamburg with a cargo of grain when she developed a list in the Bay of Biscay and was abandoned before she capsized and sank.

AFRICAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1903 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4916grt, a length of 410ft 1in, a beam of 52ft 1in and a service speed of 11 knots. Launched on 12th February 1903 she entered service in the following May. On 21st July 1917 during a voyage from Liverpool to Newport News she was torpedoed by U-66 60 miles northwest of Tory Island.

AFGHAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1903 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4923grt, a length of 410ft 2in, a beam of 52ft 1in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the African Prince she was launched on 26th June 1903 and entered service in the following August. On 30th July 1918 she was wrecked near Cape Gabarius on the coast of Nova Scotia.

WELSH PRINCE (2) was built in 1903 by R. Craggs & Sons at Middlesbrough with a tonnage of 4934grt, a length of 410ft 2in, a beam of 52ft 1in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the African Prince she entered service in October 1903. On 13th October 1916 she was torpedoed by U-43 when 33 miles southwest of Cape Matapan in Greece. (Photo: E Johnson)

CROWN PRINCE (2) was built in 1904 by Wm. Dobson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 2539grt, a length of 325ft, a beam of 45ft 4in and a service speed of 10 knots. Delivered in April 1904 her career lasted only 6 years. On 16th October 1910 during a voyage from Santos to New Orleans with a cargo of coffee she was wrecked at Hatandes Point in Cuba.

BLACK PRINCE (2) was built in 1903 by Russell & Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 3925grt, a length of 345ft 2in, a beam of 49ft 11in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed as the Provan for J. Lockie & Co. of Newcastle in January 1903 and purchased by Prince Line Ltd and renamed Black Prince in 1904. In 1922 she was sold to Naviera Guadalquivir S. A. of Seville with J. Orelana as manager and renamed Guardiaro. Fourteen years later she was acquired by Perez & Echevarrieta of Bilboa who renamed her Udondo and two years later, in 1938, she was purchased by Pedro Perez Gante of Bilbao for use during the Spanish Civil War as the Gante. In the following year she was sold to Jose de Navas Escuder of Bilbao and renamed Albareda. She was sold to Transportes Aduanas y Consignaciones S.A. of Barcelona, renamed Sac Coruna, and after a further fifteen years service was broken up at Barcelona during February 1965.

BELGIAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1885 by Sir W.G. Armstrong, Mitchell at Newcastle with a tonnage of 2831grt, a length of 310ft 6in, a beam of 39ft and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was completed in November 1885 as the Hajeen for the Bedouin Steam Navigation Co. of Liverpool, with W & R Thomson as manager, and in 1900 was acquired by Aznar y Cia of Bilbao who renamed her Berriz. In 1907, when in need of engine repairs, she was purchased by the Wallsend Slipway & Engine Co., renamed Belgian Prince and placed under the management of James Knott. In 1910 she was sold to Haldor Virik and renamed Normanna for operation by Hvalfangerakties Normanna of Sandfjord. On 22nd February 1917 she was torpedoed off the Scilly Isles.

PIEDMONTESE PRINCE/RE D’ITALIA was built in 1907 by Sir James Laing & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 6149grt, a length of 430ft, a beam of 52ft 8in and a service speed of 14 knots. She was laid down as the Piedmontese Prince but acquired on the stocks by Lloyd Sabaudo Soc. Anon de Nav. of Genoa when Prince Line withdrew from the Italy-New York service. Launched on the 22nd December 1906 as the Re d’Italia she commenced her maiden voyage on 6th April 1907 from Genoa to New York with calls at Naples and Palermo. During December 1908 she was used as a hospital ship at Messina following the earthquake. On 26th September 1911 she began a fourteen month spell as a hospital ship during the Italo-Turkish war. With 13 medical staff and accommodation for 116 patients she served between Italy and Libya and evacuated 36,983 sick and wounded. In 1912 she made a solitary voyage to Constantinople. In 1920 her accommodation was reduced to first and third class only and in the following year she was transferred to the South American service. After a further eight years service she was broken up in 1929 at Genoa.

SARDINIAN PRINCE (2)/REGINA D’ITALIA was built in 1907 by Sir James Laing & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 6149grt, a length of 430ft, a beam of 52ft 8in and a service speed of 14 knots. Sister of the Piedmontese Prince she was laid down as the Sardinian Prince but acquired on the stocks by Lloyd Sabaudo Soc. Anon de Nav. of Genoa when Prince Line withdrew from the Italy-New York service. Launched on the 20th January 1907 as the Regina d’Italia she commenced her maiden voyage on 15th May 1907 from Genoa to New York and on the following 6th October inaugurated the company’s Genoa to South America service as the Tomaso di Savoia was not ready in time.. During December 1908, together with her sister, she was used as a hospital ship at Messina following the earthquake. During 1911 she served as a hospital ship during the Italo-Turkish war between Benghazi and Derna. In 1920 her accommodation was reduced to first and third class only and in 1922 she was transferred to the South American service. After a further six years service she was broken up in October 1928 at Genoa.

SPANISH PRINCE (2) was built in 1894 by Chas. Connell & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 6505grt, a length of 450ft, a beam of 52ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. She was launched on 6th June 1894 and completed in the following August as the Knight Batchelor for Greenshields, Cowie & Co. of Liverpool, a company whose history goes back to 1795. On 26th April 1897, during a voyage from Cardiff to Norfolk, she hit an iceberg and limped into Halifax four days later with 30 feet of her bow missing. Repairs cost $30,000. She was acquired by Prince Line in 1907 for £35,000 and, as the Spanish Prince, was the company’s largest ship and remained so until 1918. On 5th October 1914, whilst in St. Nazaire Roads, she sustained damage to her hull when her anchor chain broke and she grounded. She was subsequently acquired by the Admiralty and on 15th February 1915 was sunk as a block ship in the western entrance to Dover Harbour. A permanent wreck buoy marks the spot.

SWEDISH PRINCE (2) was built in 1896 by J. L. Thompson & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 3712grt, a length of 356ft, a beam of 48ft 6in and a service speed of 10.5 knots. She was completed in July 1896 as the Howick Hall for Charles D. Dunn & Co. of Liverpool’s Globe Shipping Co. Purchased by Prince Line in 1907 she was renamed Swedish Prince. On 17th August 1916 she was sunk by gunfire from U-35 near to Pantellaria during a voyage from Salonika to Bizerta. One crew member lost his life and the Master, Chief Engineer and a gunner were taken prisoner.

CORSICAN PRINCE (1) was built in 1900 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2776grt, a length of 316ft, a beam of 42ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was completed in April 1900 as the Briardale for G. H. Elder & Co. of Newcastle and purchased by James Knott, who renamed her Corsican Prince, for Prince Line in 1907 when Elder’s went out of business. On 7th February 1917 she was torpedoed by UB-34 three miles off Whitby during a voyage from Dundee to Dunkirk.

OCEAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1907 by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson at Newcastle with a tonnage of 5101grt, a length of 401ft, a beam of 50ft 2in and a service speed of 10.5 knots. Completed in May 1907 she was taken over as an ammunition carrier in 1914 and given Pennant No. 193. On 15th December 1916 she was wrecked in fog near Quenada Light, Cap la Hoque whilst approaching Cherbourg. Attempts by tug to move her failed but the crew were safely evacuated.

NORSE PRINCE was built in 1907 by Palmer’s Co. at Jarrow with a tonnage of 5611grt, a length of 420ft 1in, a beam of 54ft 4in and a service speed of 12 knots. Prince Line’s first quadruple expansion steamship she entered service in November 1907 on the New York to South and East Africa service. On 3rd January 1910 she caught fire and was abandoned off Ascension Island during a voyage from New York to Cape Town.

ROYAL PRINCE (2) was built in 1907 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 5547grt, a length of 417ft 10in, a beam of 54ft 6in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Norse Prince she was delivered in December 1907. In 1924 she was sold to Soc. Anon. de Nav. ‘La Serenissima’ of Genoa who renamed her Sic Vos non Nobis. (Literal translation of the Latin is ‘Thus for you not us’ meaning ‘Service First’) By 1927 her owners realised that the name was cumbersome and changed it to Battinin Accame. In 1931 she was sold to Industrie Navali S. A. (I.N.S.A) of Genoa who renamed her Fortunato and in June of the following year she was broken up in Italy. (Photo: E Johnson)

SCOTTISH PRINCE (2) was built in 1910 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2897grt, a length of 340ft 7in, a beam of 46ft 5in and a service speed of 10 knots. First of a class of four ships she entered service in March 1910. On 7th September 1917 she was damaged when hit by a torpedo in the English Channel. In 1920 she served with Furness, Withy and was given a black hull with a white band and Furness’s funnel livery. She was sold to the Hellenic Lines Ltd, with P. G. Callimanopoulos as manager, in 1937 and renamed Athenai. In July 1940 she was seized by the Italians off Messina and renamed Palermo by unknown managers. On 9th September 1943 she was seized by the Germans off Valonia in Albania when Italy capitulated and was operated by Mittelmeer Reederi GmbH with the same name. In May 1944 she was badly damaged when she hit a mine off Tagliamento and taken into Fiume (Rijeka). Whilst there she was sunk by Allied bombers in the following July.

EASTERN PRINCE (2) as built in 1910 by J. Priestman & Co. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2881grt, a length of 340ft 7in, a beam of 46ft 5in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Scottish Prince she was delivered in March 1910. On 30th August 1917 she was torpedoed by U-62 thirty miles off the Eddystone lighthouse.

ASIATIC PRINCE (2) as built in 1910 by J. Priestman & Co. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 2877grt, a length of 340ft 7in, a beam of 46ft 5in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Scottish Prince she was completed for Prince Line in June 1910. On 30th May 1918 she became Prince Line’s last WW1 casualty when she was torpedoed by U-63 190 miles east of Malta during a voyage from Bone to Salonika.

INDIAN PRINCE (2) as built in 1910 by J. Readhead & Sons at South Shields with a tonnage of 2845grt, a length of 340ft 7in, a beam of 46ft 5in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Scottish Prince she entered service in July 1910. On 4th September 1914 she was captured by the German auxiliary cruiser Kronprinz Wilhelm 210 miles north east of Pernambuco and sunk by bombs on 9th September. She was the former Nordddeutscher Lloyd ship’s first capture.

BURMESE PRINCE was built in 1911 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4825grt, a length of 396ft, a beam of 54ft 4in and a service speed of 11 knots. The first of four similar ships she was delivered in April 1911. In 1927 she was sold to the Miguel Larrinaga Steamship Co. of Liverpool and renamed Lucille de Larrinaga for operation by the Larrinaga Steamship Co. After a further seven years service she was broken up at Blyth by Hughes, Bolckow in June 1934.

SIAMESE PRINCE (1) was built in 1911 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4834grt, a length of 396ft, a beam of 54ft 4in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Burmese Prince she entered service in September 1911. On 16th August 1914 she was stopped by the German light cruiser Dresden but allowed to continue on her voyage when it was determined that she was not carrying a cargo that could be used in the war. She was attacked by a U-boat on 4th November 1916 when 210 miles west of the Scilly Isles but she managed to outpace her surfaced attacker. On 6th July 1917 she was again attacked by a surfaced U-boat but accurate gunfire from her stern gun caused the submarine to submerge. Two months later, on 4th September, she was missed by a torpedo in the Bay of Biscay. In March 1925 she was sold to Christian Salvesen’s South Georgia Co. for conversion into s whale processing ship and renamed Saragossa. On 16th March 1932 she had to be scuttled off the South Shetland Islands when a fire broke out in her whale oil. The crew were rescued by the accompanying whale catchers. (Photo: World Ship Society)

JAPANESE PRINCE (1) was built in 1911 by Wm. Doxford & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4876grt, a length of 396ft, a beam of 54ft 4in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Burmese Prince she entered service in September 1911. On 3rd November 1915 she was chased by and outpaced a U-boat in the Mediterranean. On 10th February 1917, during a voyage from Newport News to Southampton, she was torpedoed by UC-47 when she was 24 miles southwest of Bishops Rock.

CHINESE PRINCE (2) was built in 1911 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4834grt, a length of 396ft, a beam of 54ft 4in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Burmese Prince she entered service in July 1911. In 1925 she was sold to Soc. Anon. Navigazione Alta Italia of Genoa, renamed Monviso and broken up in Italy during 1933. (Photo: E Johnson)

ORANGE PRINCE was built in 1894 by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 3578grt, a length of 350ft, a beam of 43ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Completed as the Strathmore for Burrell & Son of Glasgow in June 1894 she was sold to McLaren & MacLaren of Glasgow in 1900 who retained her name. When MacLaren & MacLaren went out of business in 1903 she was acquired by W. R. Corfield & Co. of Cardiff and renamed Wye. She was purchased by Prince Line Ltd and renamed Orange Prince in 1912. On 15th November 1915 she was torpedoed by U-39 85 miles from Gavdo Island in the Mediterranean with the loss of three lives.

AUSTRIAN PRINCE/SERVIAN PRINCE was built in 1901 by J. L. Thompson & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4831grt, a length of 390ft, a beam of 51ft and a service speed of 11 knots. She was one of three ships built built for Timothy Hogan’s Menantic Steam Ship Co. of New York to carry bulk grain of livestock on the main deck and entered service as the Monomoy, registered under the North Atlantic Steam Ship Co. of Bristol. Acquired by Prince Line in February 1912 she was renamed Austrian Prince but in 1914 this was changed to Servian Prince as Austria were the enemy and Serbia one of the Allies. In 1923 she was sold to C. Devoto fu GB of Genoa who renamed her Sorriso and in 1926 she was broken up at Genoa. (Photo: E Johnson)

HUNGARIAN PRINCE/BELGIAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1901 by Sir James Laing & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4765grt, a length of 391ft 6in, a beam of 51ft and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Austrian Prince she was built as the Mohawk for Hogan’s Menantic Steamship Company of New York but registered under the North Atlantic Steam Ship Co. of Bristol. She was acquired by Prince Line in February 1912 when her name was changed to Hungarian Prince. On the outbreak of the First World War her name was changed to Belgian Prince as Hungary became an enemy nation. On 24th February 1915 she was chased by a U-boat in the English Channel but managed to outpace her. However, on 31st July 1917, during a voyage from Liverpool to Newport News, she was torpedoed by U-55 when she was 175 miles northwest of Tory island. The master was taken prisoner and 19 crew members were lined up on the submarine’s casing. With the unfounded belief that a British warship was in the vicinity the U-boat commander then submerged washing the crew members off the casing. In all 39 crew members lost their lives.

BULGARIAN PRINCE/FRENCH PRINCE was built in 1901 by Sir James Laing & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4766grt, a length of 390ft, a beam of 51ft and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Austrian Prince she was built as the Mineola for Hogan’s Menantic Steamship Company of New York but registered under the North Atlantic Steam Ship Co. of Bristol. She was the last of the three sisters acquired by Prince Line in 1912 when her name was changed to Bulgarian Prince and entered service in 1913. Her named was altered to French Prince in late 1914 when Bulgaria entered the was against the Allies. On 15th February 1917, during a voyage from La Plata to France, she was captured and sunk by the German auxiliary cruiser Mowe when 490 miles off the coast of Cape Frio in Brazil. The Mowe was on her second operation and on the previous day had been forced to sink the German supply ship Geier (formerly Rankin Gilmour’s Theodore which had been captured on 12th December 1916) as her machinery had broken down.

HIGHLAND PRINCE (3) was built in 1901 by J. L. Thompson & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 3390grt, a length of 335ft 10ins, a beam of 48ft and a service speed of 10 knots. Completed as the Matteawan for Timothy Hogan & Sons of New York and registered to the North Atlantic Steamship Co. of Bristol she was acquired by Prince Line Ltd and renamed Highland Prince in 1912. On 11th April 1917 she was torpedoed by UB-50 during a voyage from Alexandria to London when she was 36 miles off Cape Bon with the loss of 3 lives.

PORTUGUESE PRINCE (2) was built in 1912 by J. Priestman & Co. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4981grt, a length of 410ft, a beam of 53ft 4ins and a service speed of 11 knots. She was delivered to Prince Line Ltd in April 1912 and in December 1914 carried 1,200 horses to La Pallice in France from Galveston. The holds were partially loaded with coal which was decked over and on which stalls were erected. On of the holds was loaded with hay and her tanks filled with water. Fifty drovers were carried to care for the horses and the venture was so successful that she continued to carry horses for the duration of the war. She continued to operate until May 1934 when she was broken up by W. Arnott, Young & Co. at Troon. (Photo: E Johnson)

RUSSIAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1912 by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 4158grt, a length of 357ft 2ins, a beam of 48ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was one of two oil tankers built for Prince Line Ltd. and was given a black hull, entering service in September 1912. On 8th June 1917 she was hit by a torpedo when she was off southeast Ireland but managed to reach Queenstown safely. She was sold to British Tankers on 6th March 1918 and renamed British Marshal. In November 1929 she was sold to Soc. Italiana Transporti Petroloferi of Genoa who renamed her Tritone. On 7th March 1933 she was condemned and broken up in Italy after grounding on the Island of Tenedos. (Photo: World Ship Society)

ROUMANIAN PRINCE was built in 1913 by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 4147grt, a length of 357ft 2ins, a beam of 48ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Russian Prince she entered service in February 1913 and remained with the company until she was sold to British Tankers in 1918 and renamed British Major. On 19th November 1929 she was sold to Cia. Generale Armamento S. A. of Genoa who renamed her Riva Sicula. She was scrapped where she lay after grounding on 20th April 1933 during a voyage from Constanta to Genoa.

STUART PRINCE (2) was built in 1899 by Turnbull & Sons at Whitby with a tonnage of 3597grt, a length of 351ft 4ins, a beam of 43ft and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was built as the Hutton for Pyman Bros’ London & Northern Steam Ship Co. of London and acquired by Prince Line Ltd. who renamed her Stuart Prince in September 1912. On 22nd March 1917 she was torpedoed by U-66 85 miles off the Pembroke coast in the St. George’s Channel during a voyage from Manchester to Alexandria. (Photo: As Pyman Bros ‘Hutton’)

TUSCAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1913 by William Doxford & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 5275grt, a length of 420ft, a beam of 54ft 1in and a service speed of 12 knots. Built for Prince Line Ltd she entered service in December 1913. On 5th August 1918 she was torpedoed and holed when in the English Channel but managed to reach port. Four and a half years later, on 14th February 1923, while proceeding to Vancouver in a blinding snow storm, she was wrecked on Village Island in Barkley Sound, British Columbia. The Pacific Salvage Co. managed to recover most of her cargo but as the upperworks were being removed she slipped into deep water.(Photo: E Johnson)

ROMAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1914 by William Doxford & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 5284grt, a length of 420ft, a beam of 54ft 1in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Tuscan Prince she entered service in March 1914. In January 1927 she was sold to Thomas Law & Co’s Law Shipping Co. of Glasgow and renamed Berwick Law. Six years later she became the Benlomond when she was acquired by Wm. Thomson & Co’s Ben Line. In August 1935 she was sold to Kassos Steam Navigation Co. of Piraeus and renamed Chrysopolis. On 18th June 1936, during a voyage from Emden to Cape Town, she was wrecked off Cape Barbas in Senegal.

MOORISH PRINCE was built in 1914 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 5943grt, a length of 425ft 6in, a beam of 56ft 5in and a service speed of 11 knots. One of a pair of ships she entered service in May 1914. In 1927 she was sold to Miguel de Larrinaga Steam Ship Co. of Liverpool and renamed Anselma de Larrinaga. Four years later the Larrinaga Steam Ship Co. was formed to take over the ownership of the Larinnaga fleet and in May 1934 the Moorish Prince/Anselma de Larrinaga was broken up on the Clyde.

BRITISH PRINCE (2) was built in 1914 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 5936grt, a length of 425ft, a beam of 56ft 5in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Moorish Prince she was delivered in August 1914. On 1st November 1915 during a voyage from Cape Town to Luderitz Bay she grounded on Possession Island, broke her back and was declared a total loss. (Photo: Short Bros)

POLAR PRINCE was built in 1895 by Wigham, Richardson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 3547grt, a length of 340ft, a beam of 44ft and a service speed of 10 knots. She was built as the Goldenfels for Deutsche Dampschiff Ges. ‘Hansa’ of Bremen and in 1911 became the Ingeborg owned by Spielmann & Co. before being resold to the Hamburg Amerika Line who renamed her Persia. According to HAPAG she then reverted to Spielmann & Co. In 1912 she was sold to Deutsche Levante Linie of Hamburg who renamed her Oberon and then was renamed Kawak by Bremer Dampfer ‘Atlas’ under the management of Deutsche Levante Linie. On 8th August 1914 she was captured in the Mediterranean by HMS Chatham and taken into Bizerta. She arrived at Malta on 21st September, was condemned as a prize and renamed Polar Prince for management by J. Knott & Sons, a separate company located with Prince Line Ltd in Milburn House. In 1917 she was transferred to the Admiralty under the management of Farrar, Groves & Co of Liverpool and on 18th September 1917 was torpedoed by UB-50 when 8 miles southwest of Cape Spartel in Tangiers.

POLISH PRINCE was built in 1894 by Sir Raylton Dixon & Co. at Middlesbrough with a tonnage of 2969grt, a length of 315ft, a beam of 41ft 11in and a service speed of 10 knots. She completed as the Lindenfels for Deutsche Dampschiff Ges. ‘Hansa’ of Bremen and was renamed Ghazipur by her owners in 1903. In 1906 she was sold to Dampschiff Ge. ‘Argo’ of Bremen who renamed her Arcturus. Six years later she was sold to Deutsche Levante Linie who renamed her Kalymnos. On 6th August 1914 she was captured by HMS Savage, taken into Bizerta and on 29th November in Malta was condemned as a prize and renamed Polish Prince for management by James Knott & Sons Ltd. On 17th July 1915 she sank after being in collision with Furness Withy’s Lowther Range 230 miles west of Ireland whilst in a convoy sailing between Havana and the UK.

MONGOLIAN PRINCE was built in 1913 by Russell & Co. at Port Glasgow with a tonnage of 5880grt, a length of 423ft 6in, a beam of 56ft and a service speed of 10.5 knots. She was built as the Verdala for the Verdala Steam Ship Co. with Gow, Harrison & Co. as managers and in 1917 was acquired by Prince Line Ltd who renamed her Mongolian Prince. She was sold to Jugoslavenska Lloyd of Dubrovik in 1929 and renamed Istok. When Jugoslavia fell in 1940 she was taken over by the Jugoslav controlled Crest Shipping who renamed her Maycrest. On 29th July 1944 she was towed from Cardiff to the Normandy beachhead (Gooseberry 2 – Omaha Beach, Mulberry A) and on 1st August was scuttled as a blockship in the artificial harbour. She replaced ships which had been displaced by the June/July gales and her accommodation, which was above the waterline, housed anti-aircraft gunner.

SIBERIAN PRINCE was built in 1915 by Russell & Co. at Port Glasgow with a tonnage of 5604grt, a length of 423ft 6in, a beam of 56ft and a service speed of 10.5 knots. Sister of the Mongolian Prince she was built as the Baron Lovat for Hugh Hogarth & Co. of Ardrossan and acquired by the Peareth Shipping Co. of Newcastle in July 1917 who renamed her Siberian Prince. In 1924 she was transferred to Prince Line Ltd who retained her name. In December 1933 she was sold to L. A. Embericos of London, renamed Dunavi and in 1939 her name was changed to Arlsiana when she was acquired by Industrie Navali Soc. Anon (INSA) of Genoa. When Tunis fell to the Allies in April 1943 she was found there sunk and abandoned. On 29th May 1946 the hulk was purchased by Societe Tunisienne de Sauvetage and refloated on 30th October. In 1948, on 21st October, she left Tunis and was towed to the Tyne where she was broken up by Clayton & Davie Ltd.

HUNTSLAND was built in 1911 by Bremer Vulkan at Port Vegesak with a tonnage of 2871grt, a length of 338ft 8in, a beam of 48ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was built as the Eurymanthos for the Deutsche Levante Linie of Hamburg. On 6th August 1914 she was captured by HMS Hussar and taken into Valetta where she was condemned as a prize and renamed Huntsland. Requisitioned by the Admiralty she was placed under the management of J. Knott & Sons but in 1917 she was considered to be a mis-match with other Prince Line ships and was transferred to Wm. Robertson of Glasgow. On 6th June 1918, during a voyage from Le Havre to Portsmouth, she was torpedoed by UC-77 23 miles from Le Havre in the English Channel.

GAELIC PRINCE (1) was built in 1917 by Short Bros. at Port Sunderland with a tonnage of 6506grt, a length of 449ft 6in, a beam of 57ft 4in and a service speed of 12 knots. The first of four sister ships she was completed in April 1918 and remained with the company until 1929 when she was sold to Deutsche Dampschiff Ges. ‘Hansa’ of Bremen and renamed Rheinfels. In 1939 she was sold to the Hamburg Sud Amerika Linie who changed her name to Bahia Castillo. On 29th August she sailed from Santa Cruz on a blockade breaking voyage to Murmansk where she arrived on 16th October. Shortly after she moved to Hamburg where she became a naval troop transport. On 21st May 1940 she was returned to the Hamburg Sud Amerika Linie and on the 1st August was torpedoed by the British submarine HMS Narwhal of the Skaw. Towed into Kiel she was broken up for her steel. (Photo: E Johnson)