History of the Merchant Navy
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James P Corry & Co. was founded by Robert Corry who was born in County Down, Northern Ireland in 1800. By 1826 he had established a timber importing business from Canada and in that year purchased his first sailing vessel, the 325grt Chieftan, followed, in 1840, by the 198grt Summerhill. In 1843 he became the owner of the 1433grt Queen of the West as a result of unconventional circumstances. Built in New York for Woodhall & Minturn Ltd of Liverpool she stranded during a gale near Carrickfergus in Ireland. Robert Corry purchased the ship together with her cargo of American cotton and by selling the cargo cleared his costs and had the ship repaired. She continued to serve under the Corry flag until 1875.

In 1851 Robert’s son William joined the company which had become Corry & Co. and in that year the 1132grt Persian joined the fleet. This was followed, in 1852, by the 519grt barque Alabama , which was built in St. John’s, Nova Scotia, and the ship rigged Saint Helena, 811grt, which was also built in Canada. Because of his contacts in Canada Robert Corry tended to have his ships built there. Timber was plentiful and, providing the building cost was favourable, it was more economic to construct wooden hulled ships in Canada. When completed the ships would load timber and undertake a profitable maiden voyage across the North Atlantic to Great Britain. Under this policy the 1060grt Charger was built at New Brunswick in 1856.

In 1859 the company extended its operations to India by deploying the Charger on the Calcutta route to exploit the jute trade. The expansion into the India trade led to the eventual transfer of the shipowning activities of the company from Belfast to London. By this time shipowners in general were becoming interested in íron hulled ships as they were less vulnerable to ‘hull rot’ and, consequently, a fleet replacement programme was initiated.

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The Corry’s went to Harland & Wolff in Belfast in 1860 and commissioned the first of twelve almost identical ships, eleven of which were given names prefixed by Star of… setting the precedent for future ship naming and the birth of the Star Line. The Jane Porter, named after the wife of William Corry, was the first sailing ship built at Harland & Wolff’s Belfast yard. The first of the ‘Star’s’, the Star of Erin, was built in 1862 and, thereafter, the Corry sailing ships became famous for their splendid condition and elegance. In 1874 the company’s largest sailing ship, the 1981grt Star of Russia, entered service. Not only were the ships prefixed with ‘Star of…’ they were, with one or two exceptions, named after countries.

James P.Corry was created baronet in 1885 and thereafter spend most of his time looking after the Belfast timber trade. In the following the company took delivery of their last sailing ship the Star of Austria which was built by Workman, Clark & Co. at Belfast, a shipbuilder with whom a close relationship evolved as they were both interested in the development of refrigerated cargo spaces.

In 1887 the company took delivery of their first steamship, the Star of Victoria, named in celebration of Queen Victoria’s 50th year on the throne, quickly followed by the Star of England. Hitherto, the company’s sailing ships were their proudest achievements but the introduction of these two vessels was to herald the beginning of even greater achievements in the frozen meat trade. However, on completion the ships were deployed on the India jute run. By this time founder Robert Corry’s grandson, James P. Corry, was chairman of the the company which had become James P. Corry & Co. Ltd.

In 1889 G.D. Tyser & Co. chartered the two steamships for their Colonial & Union Co. service to New Zealand and had refrigeration plants installed. The management of Corry’s recognised the potential and after six voyages they paid Tyser’s for the cost of the refrigeration plant and continued to work with them on a commission basis. In the same year Alexander McDonald, a former employee of Workman, Clark & Co., joined the company to advise on the refrigeration aspect of all Corry’s future pre- Commonwealth & Dominion buildings which were to be constructed by Workman, Clark.

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The company moved to larger premises at 9-11 Fenchurch Street, London in 1891 and during that year Sir James Corry died. He was succeeded as Chairman by his son Sir William Corry Bt and from thereon shipping became the company’s prinicipal business.

In 1898 the Star of Bengal, the Star of Russia and the Star of Italy were sold bringing to an end the company’s deployment of sailing ships. It was the management’s intention to enter the Argentinian frozen meat trade and with this in mind the Star of Ireland was built in 1903. She was smaller than other vessels in the fleet and was soon joined by the older Star of New Zealand in order to operate a two ship service on the run to the River Plate.

In 1912 in conjunction with Thomas B. Royden & Co. and G.D. Tyser & Co. agreement was reached with the Government of the State of Victoria to carry emigrants to Melbourne. Five ships were earmarked for the service with Corry’s providing two, Tyser’s providing two and Roydens’s one. Corry’s had two larger ships delivered in 1914, the Star of Victoria (2)and the Star of England (2) each capable of carrying 1000 emigrants and with three quarters of their cargo space equipped with refrigeration plants.

On 23rd January 1914 J.P. Corry’s Star Line, Thos. B. Royden’s Indra Line, Tyser & Co. and Wm. Milburn’s Anglo-Australian S.N. Co. incorporated the Commonwealth & Dominion Line which was later to become Port Line in 1937.

The Fleet
The history of James P Corry & Co. and its’ ships has been extracted from
Merchant Fleets 21: Port Line by Duncan Haws
to whom we extend our grateful thanks.
Available from TCL PUBLICATIONS

JANE PORTER was built in1860 by Harland &Wolff & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 953grt, a length of 200ft and a beam of 32ft. Ship rigged she was the first sailing ship built by Harland & Wolff and named after the wife of William Corry. Jane Porter was a member of the well known Porter family who were leading owners in Belfast and later became equally well known as Iredale & Porter of Liverpool. On completion the ship was placed on the London to Calcutta service via the Cape and in 1871 made her best outward passage time of 93 days. After 29 years service she was sold to Wm. Ross & Co. in 1889 and reduced to a barque rig. In 1890 she was sold to H. Burmester of Hamburg and renamed Nanny. On 1st June 1905 during a voyage from Bombay to East London she was wrecked on the Natal coast.

STAR OF ERIN was built in1862 by Harland &Wolff & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 949grt, a length of 200ft and a beam of 32ft. Sister of the Jane Porter she was the first Corry vessel to bear a Star name and set the precedent for naming the ships after countries, Erin being the poetic name for Ireland. She was similarly placed on the London to Calcutta run and made her best outward passage time of 80 days in 1873. In 1889 she was sold to Park Bros. of London, retaining her name, and three years later, in February 1892, she was wrecked on the lee shore in the Forveaux Straits, New Zealand.

STAR OF DENMARK was built in1863 by Harland &Wolff & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 988grt, a length of 213ft 2in and a beam of 32ft. She was the first of three ships which were slightly longer than the previous two with a corresponding increase in tonnage. In 1872, having ridden out a cyclone in Saugor Road, she sprang a leak off Madagasgar during her homeward passage from Calcutta and began taking water. In position 20 08S 1.08W, 74 days out from Calcutta, she was spoken to by Marshall’s Berkshire but declined assistance. By this time she had taken in over 10ft of water in the holds and was down at the stern. With each rise of the swell her forefoot came out of the sea which made steering difficult but she eventually reached London unaided. In 1877 she made her best passage outward to Calcutta in 96 days. She was sold to F.M. Tucker of London in 1889 and by 1891 was owned by Hine Bros. of Workington with the name Denton Holme and eventually became a total constructive loss.

STAR OF SCOTIA was built in 1864 by Harland &Wolff & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 999grt, a length of 212ft and a beam of 32ft 1in. She completed her best passage time to Calcutta of 90 days in 1873. In January 1885 during a passage from Cardiff to Colombo with a cargo of coal she was swept by a heavy sea off Cape Cornwall, the only Cape in England, carrying away the watchkeeping crew, the compass and the binnacle. On 27th April 1887 she left San Francisco on a voyage to Queenstown and London and on 27th June was wrecked on Bull Point, Falkland Islands with the loss of seven lives.

STAR OF ALBION was built in 1864 by Harland &Wolff & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 999grt, a length of 214ft and a beam of 32ft 1in. She completed her best passage time to Calcutta of 83days in 1876. On 29th September 1886 the ship had arrived in the Hooghli Delta with a cargo of coal. Having encountered storm clouds for several days it had not been possible to obtain a position fix and the ship inadvertently sailed to the west of Long Sands. She put about hoping to see the pilot brig which should have been on the east side but she was lost when she grounded as she crossed the shallows. In a subsequent enquiry the master was deemed to have hazarded his ship and had his certificate suspended for six months.

STAR OF PERSIA was built in 1868 by Harland &Wolff & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 1289grt, a length of 227ft and a beam of 35ft. The first of three larger ships built for the Calcutta run she was faster than anything built hitherto and completed her best time of 79 day to Calcutta in 1876. With a usual cargo of 1850 tons of coal outward and jute on the return she achieved this time on several occasions and was known for her regularity. Much of her success was due to the skill of the master than to the quality of the ship. Once the master knew how to handle the ship in every kind of weather regular passage times were the norm and for that reason owners normally required masters to stay with the same ship for as long as possible. It was not uncommon to complete an entire seagoing career on one ship which was turned into a home often shared with a wife. For example, Capt. J. Smith served on only two Corry ships as master in 29 years. In 1893 the Star of Persia was sold to C.M. Matzen of Hamburg and renamed Edith for their Zanzibar – South America – Portland, Oregon run. She was lost in 1903 when she sprang a leak northwest of New Caledonia during a voyage from Puget Sound, Washington to Port Pirie, South Australia and grounded on the Solomon islands.

STAR OF GREECE was built in 1868 by Harland &Wolff & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 1289grt, a length of 227ft and a beam of 35ft. The second of the trio she was, again, a fast ship regularly making passages from London to Calcutta via the Cape in 79 days. Although a ‘wet ship’ in a seaway, leisurely shaking herself free of water after dipping her bow into a wave, she created the record time for the round voyage to Calcutta in 5 months 27 days, 80 days out, 83 days back with 10 days in Calcutta, a time never bettered by another sailing ship. To record this achievement a brass game cock was mounted on the mainmast truck to signify ‘Cock of the Route’. Another unique feature of the ship was that she always flew a silk Greek ensign, made by and presented to her by the ladies of the Greek community in Calcutta, on the foremast when in port. On 27th August 1883 she was drenched in ash when the volcanic island of Krakatoa exploded and sailed through a sea of pummice. Although some hundreds of miles away in the Indian Ocean a thunderous bang was heard and the ship was covered within minutes. In 1885 the ship arrived at Hooghli with her cargo of coal smouldering in the battened down hold. As the ship was being towed into port the master leant over the rail an shouted to the tugmaster ‘Go like hell the bloody ship’s afire’. She came off the India run in 1888 and was sent to Australia. On 12th July she sailed for London out of Adelaide with a cargo of wheat but on the following day in a fierce gale and twenty five miles off course she was wrecked on a reef outside Port Willunga in the Gulf of St. Vincent, South Australia and soon broke in two. Seventeen people including the master and three stowaways drowned with ten people being saved. The master was only 29 and been in command since he was 23; it was his third voyage in her. Although visible from the shore it took the rescue appliances some 14 hours to arrive on the scene by which time it was all over. The wreck was sold for £105, the cargo for £21 and the figure head can still be seen in the Port Adelaide Maritime Museum.
An underwater survey is currently being undertaken on the remains of the ship and aerial photographs of the wreck site can be viewed at http://members.ozemail.com.au/~austerj1/sog.html

STAR OF GERMANY was built in 1872 by Harland &Wolff & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 1337grt, a length of 232ft and a beam of 35ft. The last of the trio she served on the India service until 1897 when she was sold to Foley, Aikman & Co. of London who were engaged in the same trade. In 1904 she was sold to Star of Germany Ship Co. of Belfast and managed by W.A. Rainford & Co. until the following year when she was again sold to Acties ‘Grid’ with A.Bech of Tvedestrand, Norway as managers and renamed Grid. In October 1906 she was dismasted during hurricane weather off Barbados and turned into a hulk. By 1907 she was one of five old sailing ships being used as hulks at Trinidad and in the 1920’s was still hulked there but not in use.

STAR OF BENGAL was built in 1874 by Harland &Wolff & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 1870grt, a length of 262ft 10in and a beam of 40ft 2in. The first of two larger ships she remained with Corry’s until 1898 when she was sold to J.J. Smith of San Francisco. In 1903 she was sold to E.B. Smith of San Francisco who reduced her to a barque rig. She was sold to Alaska Packers Association of San Francisco and converted into a floating fish cannery without a change of name. The new owner added further ships to his fleet which were also given Star of… names. On 22nd April 1908 she left San Francisco for Fort Wrangel, Alaska where salmon commenced. She left Fort Wrangel on 19th September with 50,000 cases of salmon, a crew of 36 and 110 cannery staff under the tow of two towing steamers the Hattie Gage and the Kayak. At 03.50 on 20th September the ship was too close to land and drifting onto Coronation Island. Although crew members on the ship shouted to the towing vessels to steam to starboard they took no notice and as the weather was rapidly deteriorating into a gale they slipped the tow for fear of being dragged ashore. The Star of Bengal dropped her anchors but they dragged and at daybreak four volunteers lowered a lifeboat in an attempt to get a line ashore and rig a breeches buoy. They just managed to jump ashore as the lifeboat was smashed on the rocks but failed to get the breeches buoy rigged. At 09.32 the ship hit the rocks broadside on bringing down the masts. Those still on board the ship were washed overboard by the raging seas, many reaching the breakers but being killed by the swirling wreckage. During the 54 minutes following the stranding 110 persons drowned.

STAR OF RUSSIA was built in 1874 by Harland &Wolff & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 1981grt, a length of 275ft and a beam of 40ft 2in. When launched on 12th December 1874 she was Corry’s largest sailing ship being marginally larger than her sister the Star of Bengal. Her maiden voyage from London to Melbourne which commenced on 25th April 1875 was completed in 81 days. In 1881 she carried the owner Sir William Corry to Australia. During a gale in 1885 the captain was aroused by a frantic ringing of the ship’s bell. On reaching the deck he found only the helmsman; the mate and the other watchkeepers had been swept overboard while handling the head sails. In 1886, although being nearly overwhelmed during a fierce gale, she made her fastest passage from Lizard Point to Calcutta in 74 days. She was sold to Shaw, Saville & Albion and then to J.J. Moore of San Francisco in 1898 and sailed under the Hawaiian flag shortly before the island was annexed to the USA. By 1901 she was owned by the Alaska Packers Association of San Francisco and was, in fact, the ship which set the precedent for prefixing their ship’s names with ‘Star of’. She made her final voyage from Tacoma to Samoa and the New Hebrides with a cargo of timber in 1926 before being converted into a warehouse by Burns, Philp at Apia, Samoa and renamed La Perouse. She was later moved to Noumea and served as a coal barge. In 1929 she had been moved to Sydney where Sir James Corry went aboard the hulk and found that her hull was still good although nothing else was. She eventually finished up in Port Vila Harbour, Vanuatu, where, stripped of her fine fittings, she was used as a floating warehouse. Sometime later she sank in 35 metres of water just to the north west of the main wharf where she still remains as an attraction to scuba divers.
(Photo: Steve W Lawson)

STAR OF ITALY was built in 1877 by Harland &Wolff & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 1644grt, a length of 257ft 1in and a beam of 38ft. With her sister the Star of France she was a tall ship and shared the honour of being the fastest ship in the fleet. Her fastest passage to Calcutta was completed in 77 days during which she snapped nine deck beams. In 1892 she sailed from Cardiff to San Diego with a cargo of coal in 116 days. She was sold to J.J. Moore of San Francisco in 1898 and by 1903 was owned by Pope & Talbot of San Francisco and operated by the California Shipping Co. The following year she was sold to Puget Sound Commercial Co. of Port Townsend, Washington State and in 1906 was purchased by the Alaska Packers Association of San Francisco. In 1927 she was sold to Darling-Singer Shipping & Lighterage Co. of San Francisco and by 1935 she was being used as a hulk at Buenaventura in Columbia where all trace of her was lost.

STAR OF FRANCE was built in 1877 by Harland &Wolff & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 1644grt, a length of 258ft and a beam of 38ft. The last sailing ship built for Corry’s by Harland & Wolff she was probably their consistently faster ship. Although she held no records her passage times were usually one or two days faster than any other ship in the fleet. In 1899 she was sold to J.J. Moore & Co. of San Franciso, then, in 1903 to Pope & Talbot of San Francisco. In the following year she was sold to the Puget Sound Commercial Co. of Port Townsend and by 1905 was under the ownership of the Alaska packers Association. She was being used to train Sea Scouts at San Francisco in 1928 and in 1932 was sold to Louis Rothenburg of Los Angeles. In 1933 she was re-sold to Capt. J.M. Andersen for use as a fishing barge but was much neglected. She was eventually moored off San Pedro breakwater where she remained until September 1940 when, in thick fog, she was rammed by a Japanese steamship and sank.

STAR OF AUSTRIA was built in 1886 by Workman, Clark & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 1781grt, a length of 264ft 8in and a beam of 38ft 8in. The last sailing ship with the same basic specification as the Star of Italy she was the first ship built by that yard for Corry’s and was fitted with patent bulwark thwarts which remained shut when hit by the sea but opened to release water on the deck. In 1895 during a voyage from Santa Rosalia to Swansea with a cargo of copper ore she disappeared whilst rounding Cape Horn.

STAR OF VICTORIA (1) was built in 1886 by Workman, Clark & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 3291grt, a length of 361ft 8in, a beam of 42ft 8in and a service speed of 10 knots. Corry’s first steamship she was delivered in January 1887 and began service on charter to India. In 1889 she was chartered to the Colonial Union Company, with Tyser & Co. as agents, for service to New Zealand with refrigeration plant and cork insulated holds having been installed by the agent at their cost. The cost of the refrigeration plant was reimbursed to Tyser’s by Corry’s in 1891 when they saw the potential for ships with refrigerated cargo spaces. In 1911 she was sold to Fratelli Cosulich of Trieste and renamed Frigida. Operated by Austro-Americana S.A. she was the first frozen meat ship in their fleet. On 18th December 1911 she was transferred to a new company, Societa Importazioni Carne Congelate. In October 1913 she was sold to Nicholas Mihanovich who were owned by Soc.Anonyme de Nav. Sud-Atlantica of Buenos Aires and renamed Moinho Fluminense. In early 1917 she was owned by Cia des Chemins de Fer Paris-Lyons with the name Marseille and later in the year was sold to Cie Nationale dÁffretements of Le Havre. She was finally broken up in 1919.

STAR OF ENGLAND (1) was built in 1889 by Workman, Clark & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 3584grt, a length of 371ft 10in, a beam of 44ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. A slightly larger version of her sister the Star of Victoria she had a very similar career. She was chartered for one voyage on the India run before being refrigerated by the agents Tyser & Co for operation on the Colonial Union service to New Zealand. In 1891 Corry’s reimbursed Tyser’s for the refrigeration plant and continued to operate the ship on their own account until 1913 when she was sold to T. Gazzolo fu A of Genoa and renamed Purificazione. By 1915 she was owned by Soc.Anon. Liva and in September of that year sprang a leak and was abandoned at sea.

STAR OF NEW ZEALAND was built in 1895 by Workman, Clark & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 4417grt, a length of 393ft 6in, a beam of 46ft 10in and a service speed of 11 knots. By 1902 she was deployed on the South American meat run in conjunction with the Star of Ireland. On 28th November 1915 she was wrecked near Molene, Brest during a voyage from Montevideo to Le Havre with a cargo of meat.

STAR OF AUSTRALIA was built in 1899 by Workman, Clark & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 6179grt, a length of 440ft, a beam of 55ft 1in and a service speed of 12 knots. She entered service in 1899 square rigged on the foremast but this was removed within a year or so. In 1904 she rescued the crew of a Canadian barque that was breaking up in heavy seas during a voyage to South America. During a voyage in 1912 her propeller shaft snapped when she was some 600 miles east of Aden and was left disabled and drifting. Not being equipped with radio with which she could have sent an SOS two officers and four crew members set off for Aden in a lifeboat to seek help. Two days later they managed to contact the Glenlochy (Glen Line) which came to the rescue and towed the Star of Australia to Aden. From there she was towed to England for repairs by a tug owned by the Dutch company Smit. On 23rd January 1914 she was transferred to the Commonwealth & Dominion Line following its incorporation and in April 1916 she was renamed Port Stephens. On 1st August 1918 she was in collision with and sank Hugh Roberts & Son’s North Cambria some 70 miles west of Ushant. During a voyage from Australia and New Zealand to Hull via the Panama Canal in 1920 she took in tow the disabled American steamship Tashmoo and berthed her at Queenstown after experiencing gale force conditions. The salvage award was £9500 which was more than the book value of the Port Stephens at the time. She was eventually broken up in Italy in May 1924.

STAR OF SCOTLAND was built in 1904 by Workman, Clark & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 6230grt, a length of 440ft 3in, a beam of 55ft 1in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Star of Australia she was transferred to the Commonwealth & Dominion Line following its incorporation in 1914 and renamed Port Campbell in 1916. On 7th April 1918 during a voyage from London to New York she was torpedoed by U-53 115 miles south west of Bishop Rock and sank two days later.

STAR OF JAPAN was built in 1906 by Workman, Clark & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 6236grt, a length of 440ft 3in, a beam of 55ft 1in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Star of Australia she was wrecked at Pedro de Galha on the west coast of Africa during a voyage from London to Hawkes Bay with a general cargo without any loss of life.

STAR OF IRELAND was built in 1903 by Workman, Clark & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 4331grt, a length of 380ft, a beam of 48ft 8in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was built specifically for the South American meat trade and virtually an updated version of the Star of Victoria. Although she was refrigerated and as large as some of the other vessels in the fleet she was not transferred to the Commonwealth & Dominion Line and in 1915 was sold to Nelson Steam Navigation Co. of Belfast with H & W Nelson Ltd as managers for use on a similar trade. She was renamed Highland Star by the new company in 1916. In 1927 she was laid up at Dunston-on-Tyne and broken up in 1930 by Thos. W. Ward at Inverkeithing.

STAR OF CANADA was built in 1909 by Workman, Clark & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 7280grt, a length of 470ft 4in, a beam of 58ft 5in and a service speed of 13 knots. When she entered service in October 1909 she was the company’s first twin screwed ship. On 23rd June 1912, during a voyage from New Zealand to London, she was waiting offshore to load meat when a gale blew up causing her to drag her two anchors on the sandy bottom and was wrecked on Kaiti Beach, Gisborne.

STAR OF INDIA was built in 1910 by Workman, Clark & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 7316grt, a length of 470ft 4in, a beam of 58ft 5in and a service speed of 13 knots. Sister of the Star of India she was transferred to the newly incorporated Commonwealth & Dominion Line in 1914 and renamed Port Pirie (3) in May 1916. She remained in service until November 1935 when she was scrapped by Thos. W. Ward at Briton Ferry, South Wales.

STAR OF VICTORIA (2) was built in 1914 by Workman, Clark & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 9152grt, a length of 503ft 4in, a beam of 63ft 4in and a service speed of 13 knots. During her construction there was a shortage of riveters and compressed air rivet clenching was successfully substituted. She was designed for quick conversion into an emigrant carrier and in 1914 was converted to carry 1000 troops. She was completed on 10 January 1914 for J.P.Corry but on 23rd January was transferred to the Commonwealth & Dominion Line and in 1916 was renamed Port Melbourne. In March 1917 she was requisitioned by the Shipping Controller under the Liner Requisition Scheme and immediately re-deployed on the meat run as the carriage of meat had become a priority. In 1919 she reverted to normal commercial trade and the passenger accommodation was reduced to twelve. She had a reputation, as did her sister, for wandering off course and in 1925 was fitted with a gyro compass controlled steering gear which was a new innovation at the time and supposedly cut the passage time from Melbourne to London by two days. In 1929 the management decided that as she was only fifteen years old it was worth the expenditure to re-engine her with Bauer-Wach exhaust turbines which increased fuel efficiency by some 15%-25% and to recover the cost over the following six years. Unfortunately the sudden slump in shipping trade began later that year and by 1931 she was laid up in the River Blackwater. Whilst laid up a fire broke out and the hot plating was doused by crew members and volunteers from other ships until the fire fighting equipment arrived. She was repaired on the Tyne and immediately laid up there. During 1936/7 she was again laid up in the River Blackwater until she returned to the meat run where she remained unscathed for the duration of the Second World War. On 18th May 1948 she arrived at Blyth, Northumberland and was broken up by Hughes, Bolckow.

STAR OF ENGLAND (2) was built in 1914 by Workman, Clark & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 9136grt, a length of 503ft 4in, a beam of 63ft 4in and a service speed of 13 knots. Sister of the Star of Victoria she also had air rivet clenching instead of traditional riveting on the hull. By the time she was completed the Commonwealth & Dominion Line had been incorporated and she entered service under that ownership being renamed Port Sydney in April 1916. She started her career as a troopship and in March 1917 operated under the Liner Requisition Scheme until she was decommissioned in the November and reverted to commercial use. In 1929 she was fitted with Bauer-Wach exhaust turbines. During the Second World War she continued to operate commercially but under government control and made some meat runs to the River Plate for the Royal Mail Line. On 19th December 1948 she arrived at Preston and was broken up by Thos.W.Ward. The woodwork and fittings in her saloon were so nice that they were removed and stored for eventual use in the crew lounge of the Port Sydney (2). (Photo as Port Sydney: Dick Henshaw)