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PRINCE LINE

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ORANGE PRINCE was built in 1894 by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 3578grt, a length of 350ft, a beam of 43ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Completed as the Strathmore for Burrell & Son of Glasgow in June 1894 she was sold to McLaren & MacLaren of Glasgow in 1900 who retained her name. When MacLaren & MacLaren went out of business in 1903 she was acquired by W. R. Corfield & Co. of Cardiff and renamed Wye. She was purchased by Prince Line Ltd and renamed Orange Prince in 1912. On 15th November 1915 she was torpedoed by U-39 85 miles from Gavdo Island in the Mediterranean with the loss of three lives.

AUSTRIAN PRINCE/SERVIAN PRINCE was built in 1901 by J. L. Thompson & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4831grt, a length of 390ft, a beam of 51ft and a service speed of 11 knots. She was one of three ships built built for Timothy Hogan's Menantic Steam Ship Co. of New York to carry bulk grain of livestock on the main deck and entered service as the Monomoy, registered under the North Atlantic Steam Ship Co. of Bristol. Acquired by Prince Line in February 1912 she was renamed Austrian Prince but in 1914 this was changed to Servian Prince as Austria were the enemy and Serbia one of the Allies. In 1923 she was sold to C. Devoto fu GB of Genoa who renamed her Sorriso and in 1926 she was broken up at Genoa. (Photo: E Johnson)

HUNGARIAN PRINCE/BELGIAN PRINCE (3) was built in 1901 by Sir James Laing & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4765grt, a length of 391ft 6in, a beam of 51ft and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Austrian Prince she was built as the Mohawk for Hogan's Menantic Steamship Company of New York but registered under the North Atlantic Steam Ship Co. of Bristol. She was acquired by Prince Line in February 1912 when her name was changed to Hungarian Prince. On the outbreak of the First World War her name was changed to Belgian Prince as Hungary became an enemy nation. On 24th February 1915 she was chased by a U-boat in the English Channel but managed to outpace her. However, on 31st July 1917, during a voyage from Liverpool to Newport News, she was torpedoed by U-55 when she was 175 miles northwest of Tory island. The master was taken prisoner and 19 crew members were lined up on the submarine's casing. With the unfounded belief that a British warship was in the vicinity the U-boat commander then submerged washing the crew members off the casing. In all 39 crew members lost their lives.

BULGARIAN PRINCE/FRENCH PRINCE was built in 1901 by Sir James Laing & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4766grt, a length of 390ft, a beam of 51ft and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Austrian Prince she was built as the Mineola for Hogan's Menantic Steamship Company of New York but registered under the North Atlantic Steam Ship Co. of Bristol. She was the last of the three sisters acquired by Prince Line in 1912 when her name was changed to Bulgarian Prince and entered service in 1913. Her named was altered to French Prince in late 1914 when Bulgaria entered the was against the Allies. On 15th February 1917, during a voyage from La Plata to France, she was captured and sunk by the German auxiliary cruiser Mowe when 490 miles off the coast of Cape Frio in Brazil. The Mowe was on her second operation and on the previous day had been forced to sink the German supply ship Geier (formerly Rankin Gilmour's Theodore which had been captured on 12th December 1916) as her machinery had broken down.

HIGHLAND PRINCE (3) was built in 1901 by J. L. Thompson & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 3390grt, a length of 335ft 10ins, a beam of 48ft and a service speed of 10 knots. Completed as the Matteawan for Timothy Hogan & Sons of New York and registered to the North Atlantic Steamship Co. of Bristol she was acquired by Prince Line Ltd and renamed Highland Prince in 1912. On 11th April 1917 she was torpedoed by UB-50 during a voyage from Alexandria to London when she was 36 miles off Cape Bon with the loss of 3 lives.

PORTUGUESE PRINCE (2) was built in 1912 by J. Priestman & Co. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 4981grt, a length of 410ft, a beam of 53ft 4ins and a service speed of 11 knots. She was delivered to Prince Line Ltd in April 1912 and in December 1914 carried 1,200 horses to La Pallice in France from Galveston. The holds were partially loaded with coal which was decked over and on which stalls were erected. On of the holds was loaded with hay and her tanks filled with water. Fifty drovers were carried to care for the horses and the venture was so successful that she continued to carry horses for the duration of the war. She continued to operate until May 1934 when she was broken up by W. Arnott, Young & Co. at Troon. (Photo: E Johnson)

RUSSIAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1912 by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 4158grt, a length of 357ft 2ins, a beam of 48ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was one of two oil tankers built for Prince Line Ltd. and was given a black hull, entering service in September 1912. On 8th June 1917 she was hit by a torpedo when she was off southeast Ireland but managed to reach Queenstown safely. She was sold to British Tankers on 6th March 1918 and renamed British Marshal. In November 1929 she was sold to Soc. Italiana Transporti Petroloferi of Genoa who renamed her Tritone. On 7th March 1933 she was condemned and broken up in Italy after grounding on the Island of Tenedos. (Photo: World Ship Society)

ROUMANIAN PRINCE was built in 1913 by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 4147grt, a length of 357ft 2ins, a beam of 48ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Russian Prince she entered service in February 1913 and remained with the company until she was sold to British Tankers in 1918 and renamed British Major. On 19th November 1929 she was sold to Cia. Generale Armamento S. A. of Genoa who renamed her Riva Sicula. She was scrapped where she lay after grounding on 20th April 1933 during a voyage from Constanta to Genoa.

STUART PRINCE (2) was built in 1899 by Turnbull & Sons at Whitby with a tonnage of 3597grt, a length of 351ft 4ins, a beam of 43ft and a service speed of 9.5 knots. She was built as the Hutton for Pyman Bros' London & Northern Steam Ship Co. of London and acquired by Prince Line Ltd. who renamed her Stuart Prince in September 1912. On 22nd March 1917 she was torpedoed by U-66 85 miles off the Pembroke coast in the St. George's Channel during a voyage from Manchester to Alexandria. (Photo: As Pyman Bros 'Hutton')

TUSCAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1913 by William Doxford & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 5275grt, a length of 420ft, a beam of 54ft 1in and a service speed of 12 knots. Built for Prince Line Ltd she entered service in December 1913. On 5th August 1918 she was torpedoed and holed when in the English Channel but managed to reach port. Four and a half years later, on 14th February 1923, while proceeding to Vancouver in a blinding snow storm, she was wrecked on Village Island in Barkley Sound, British Columbia. The Pacific Salvage Co. managed to recover most of her cargo but as the upperworks were being removed she slipped into deep water.(Photo: E Johnson)

ROMAN PRINCE (2) was built in 1914 by William Doxford & Sons at Sunderland with a tonnage of 5284grt, a length of 420ft, a beam of 54ft 1in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Tuscan Prince she entered service in March 1914. In January 1927 she was sold to Thomas Law & Co's Law Shipping Co. of Glasgow and renamed Berwick Law. Six years later she became the Benlomond when she was acquired by Wm. Thomson & Co's Ben Line. In August 1935 she was sold to Kassos Steam Navigation Co. of Piraeus and renamed Chrysopolis. On 18th June 1936, during a voyage from Emden to Cape Town, she was wrecked off Cape Barbas in Senegal.

MOORISH PRINCE was built in 1914 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 5943grt, a length of 425ft 6in, a beam of 56ft 5in and a service speed of 11 knots. One of a pair of ships she entered service in May 1914. In 1927 she was sold to Miguel de Larrinaga Steam Ship Co. of Liverpool and renamed Anselma de Larrinaga. Four years later the Larrinaga Steam Ship Co. was formed to take over the ownership of the Larinnaga fleet and in May 1934 the Moorish Prince/Anselma de Larrinaga was broken up on the Clyde.

BRITISH PRINCE (2) was built in 1914 by Short Bros. at Sunderland with a tonnage of 5936grt, a length of 425ft, a beam of 56ft 5in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Moorish Prince she was delivered in August 1914. On 1st November 1915 during a voyage from Cape Town to Luderitz Bay she grounded on Possession Island, broke her back and was declared a total loss. (Photo: Short Bros)

POLAR PRINCE was built in 1895 by Wigham, Richardson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 3547grt, a length of 340ft, a beam of 44ft and a service speed of 10 knots. She was built as the Goldenfels for Deutsche Dampschiff Ges. 'Hansa' of Bremen and in 1911 became the Ingeborg owned by Spielmann & Co. before being resold to the Hamburg Amerika Line who renamed her Persia. According to HAPAG she then reverted to Spielmann & Co. In 1912 she was sold to Deutsche Levante Linie of Hamburg who renamed her Oberon and then was renamed Kawak by Bremer Dampfer 'Atlas' under the management of Deutsche Levante Linie. On 8th August 1914 she was captured in the Mediterranean by HMS Chatham and taken into Bizerta. She arrived at Malta on 21st September, was condemned as a prize and renamed Polar Prince for management by J. Knott & Sons, a separate company located with Prince Line Ltd in Milburn House. In 1917 she was transferred to the Admiralty under the management of Farrar, Groves & Co of Liverpool and on 18th September 1917 was torpedoed by UB-50 when 8 miles southwest of Cape Spartel in Tangiers.

POLISH PRINCE was built in 1894 by Sir Raylton Dixon & Co. at Middlesbrough with a tonnage of 2969grt, a length of 315ft, a beam of 41ft 11in and a service speed of 10 knots. She completed as the Lindenfels for Deutsche Dampschiff Ges. 'Hansa' of Bremen and was renamed Ghazipur by her owners in 1903. In 1906 she was sold to Dampschiff Ge. 'Argo' of Bremen who renamed her Arcturus. Six years later she was sold to Deutsche Levante Linie who renamed her Kalymnos. On 6th August 1914 she was captured by HMS Savage, taken into Bizerta and on 29th November in Malta was condemned as a prize and renamed Polish Prince for management by James Knott & Sons Ltd. On 17th July 1915 she sank after being in collision with Furness Withy's Lowther Range 230 miles west of Ireland whilst in a convoy sailing between Havana and the UK.

MONGOLIAN PRINCE was built in 1913 by Russell & Co. at Port Glasgow with a tonnage of 5880grt, a length of 423ft 6in, a beam of 56ft and a service speed of 10.5 knots. She was built as the Verdala for the Verdala Steam Ship Co. with Gow, Harrison & Co. as managers and in 1917 was acquired by Prince Line Ltd who renamed her Mongolian Prince. She was sold to Jugoslavenska Lloyd of Dubrovik in 1929 and renamed Istok. When Jugoslavia fell in 1940 she was taken over by the Jugoslav controlled Crest Shipping who renamed her Maycrest. On 29th July 1944 she was towed from Cardiff to the Normandy beachhead (Gooseberry 2 - Omaha Beach, Mulberry A) and on 1st August was scuttled as a blockship in the artificial harbour. She replaced ships which had been displaced by the June/July gales and her accommodation, which was above the waterline, housed anti-aircraft gunner.

SIBERIAN PRINCE was built in 1915 by Russell & Co. at Port Glasgow with a tonnage of 5604grt, a length of 423ft 6in, a beam of 56ft and a service speed of 10.5 knots. Sister of the Mongolian Prince she was built as the Baron Lovat for Hugh Hogarth & Co. of Ardrossan and acquired by the Peareth Shipping Co. of Newcastle in July 1917 who renamed her Siberian Prince. In 1924 she was transferred to Prince Line Ltd who retained her name. In December 1933 she was sold to L. A. Embericos of London, renamed Dunavi and in 1939 her name was changed to Arlsiana when she was acquired by Industrie Navali Soc. Anon (INSA) of Genoa. When Tunis fell to the Allies in April 1943 she was found there sunk and abandoned. On 29th May 1946 the hulk was purchased by Societe Tunisienne de Sauvetage and refloated on 30th October. In 1948, on 21st October, she left Tunis and was towed to the Tyne where she was broken up by Clayton & Davie Ltd.

HUNTSLAND was built in 1911 by Bremer Vulkan at Port Vegesak with a tonnage of 2871grt, a length of 338ft 8in, a beam of 48ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was built as the Eurymanthos for the Deutsche Levante Linie of Hamburg. On 6th August 1914 she was captured by HMS Hussar and taken into Valetta where she was condemned as a prize and renamed Huntsland. Requisitioned by the Admiralty she was placed under the management of J. Knott & Sons but in 1917 she was considered to be a mis-match with other Prince Line ships and was transferred to Wm. Robertson of Glasgow. On 6th June 1918, during a voyage from Le Havre to Portsmouth, she was torpedoed by UC-77 23 miles from Le Havre in the English Channel.

GAELIC PRINCE (1) was built in 1917 by Short Bros. at Port Sunderland with a tonnage of 6506grt, a length of 449ft 6in, a beam of 57ft 4in and a service speed of 12 knots. The first of four sister ships she was completed in April 1918 and remained with the company until 1929 when she was sold to Deutsche Dampschiff Ges. 'Hansa' of Bremen and renamed Rheinfels. In 1939 she was sold to the Hamburg Sud Amerika Linie who changed her name to Bahia Castillo. On 29th August she sailed from Santa Cruz on a blockade breaking voyage to Murmansk where she arrived on 16th October. Shortly after she moved to Hamburg where she became a naval troop transport. On 21st May 1940 she was returned to the Hamburg Sud Amerika Linie and on the 1st August was torpedoed by the British submarine HMS Narwhal of the Skaw. Towed into Kiel she was broken up for her steel. (Photo: E Johnson)

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