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ALFRED HOLT & CO
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ANTENOR (2) was built in 1896 by Workman, Clark & Co. Ltd. at Belfast with a tonnage of 5531grt, a length of 422ft, a beam of 49ft and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Prometheus she was the last of the class and cost £62,796. She was transferred briefly to N. S. M. 'Oceaan' in 1914. On 9th February 1918 she was hit by a torpedo in the Mediterranean but, with assistance, was able to make port for repairs. In March 1925 she was sold to Atlantide S. A. per Imprese Marittima of Genoa and renamed Fortunato. In the following year she was broken up in Italy. (Photo: National Maritime Museum)

IDOMENEUS (1) was built in 1899 by Scott & Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 6764grt, a length of 441ft 10in, a beam of 52ft 7in and a service speed of 10 knots. Completed in 1899 she was the first of a class of nine ships which were the first to exceed 6000grt. Although they had improved hull, engine design and increased cargo carrying capacity their cost per nautical mile was no better than their predecessors. On 15th September 1917 she was damaged by a torpedo fired by U-67 during a voyage from New York to Liverpool. Towed to Vatersay in the Outer Hebrides she was beached and later refloated and repaired. In 1922 she was transferred to N. S. M. 'Oceaan' for three years before being sold to Ditta L. Pittaluga Vapori of Genoa in 1925 and renamed Aurania. After a further eight years service she was broken up at Genoa. (Photo: Ian J. Farquhar Collection)

CALCHAS (1) was built in 1899 by Scott & Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 6748grt, a length of 441ft 10in, a beam of 52ft 7in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Idomeneus she cost £83,983 and entered service in 1899. On 11th May 1917 she was torpedoed and sunk without any loss of life by U-80 five miles of Tearaght Island in Ireland during a voyage from New York to Liverpool. (Photo: Ian J. Farquhar Collection)

MACHAON (1) was built in 1899 by Scott & Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 6738grt, a length of 441ft 10in, a beam of 52ft 7in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Idomeneus she entered service in 1899. On 27th February 1918 she was torpedoed and sunk off Cani Rocks in Tunisia.

ALCINOUS (1) was built in 1899 by Scott & Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 6743grt, a length of 441ft 10in, a beam of 52ft 7in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Idomeneus she entered service in 1899. In 1914 she was requisitioned by the Government for use as a Squadron Supply Ship. On 31st March 1918 she was damaged by a torpedo fired by UB-57 in the English Channel during a voyage from London to Boston. Towed to Northfleet Buoys she was later moved to Tilbury where she was repaired and returned to service. She saw further action on 2nd September 1918 when she was fired upon by a surfaced submarine in the western Atlantic. Her accurate return of fire caused the submarine to abort the attack. She returned to Holt's in 1919 where she remained until 1925 when she was sold to Ditta L. Pittaluga Vapori of Genoa and renamed Carmania. Her name was changed to Silvania in 1928 and four years later she was broken up at Genoa. (Photo: Fred Parkinson Collection)

STENTOR (2) was built in 1899 by Workman, Clark & Co. Ltd. at Belfast with a tonnage of 6773grt, a length of 442ft 4in, a beam of 52ft 10in and a service speed of 10 knots. Considered to be the second ship of the class she had the unusual distinction of being towed from her builders in Belfast to Liverpool where her machinery was installed. She saw some war service when she served as the White Sea Ammunition Carrier No.222 in 1917. In January 1922 she was transferred to N. S. M. 'Oceaan' where she remained until 1926 when she was sold to Madrigal & Co. of the Philippines and renamed Don José. She was finally broken up in Singapore during 1912. (Photo: John Clarkson Collection)

AGAMEMNON (2) was built in 1900 by Scott & Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 7011grt, a length of 442ft 1in, a beam of 52ft 7in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was delivered in 1900 and had an uneventful career until, on 16th July 1917, she used her speed to outrun U-48 which had surfaced to engage by gunfire. In December 1927 she was sold to S. A. Commerciale Italo-Chilena and renamed Impero. Five years later, in 1932, she was broken up at Genoa. (Photo: John Clarkson Collection)

AJAX (2) was built in 1900 by Scott & Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 7043grt, a length of 441ft 10in, a beam of 52ft 7in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Idomeneus she entered service in 1900. On 1st June 1902 she grounded on the Jeddah Reef and filled with water but was successfully refloated and repaired. She was requisitioned for Government service between 12th March 1915 and 24th January 1916 for use as an Expeditionary Force Transport. On 10th October 1915 she was fired upon by U-39 when west of Crete and was rescued by a British destroyer. Between 5th December 1918 and 19th April 1919 she again acted as an Expeditionary Force Transport ferrying prisoners-of-war from Hull to Copenhagen and Belgian refugees to Antwerp. On 20th September 1920 she commenced a brief spell of trooping duties before returning to Holt's for a further ten years of commercial service. She arrived at Yokohama on 5th April 1930 where she was broken up. (Photo: John Clarkson Collection)

ACHILLES (2) was built in 1900 by Scott & Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 7043grt, a length of 442ft, a beam of 52ft 7in and a service speed of 10 knots. Costing £89,142 she entered service in 1900. In April 1915 she was requisitioned for Admiralty duties carrying Indian troops between Alexandria and the Dardanelles during which time she came under attack from Turkish batteries when two persons were killed. She next acted as a reception ship for wounded troops and later rescued 29 survivors from the torpedoed troopship Royal Edward which had sunk in the Aegean Sea on 13th August 1915 with the loss of 132 lives. On 31st march 1916, during a voyage from Sydney and Cape Town to London and Liverpool with cereals and wool, she was torpedoed and sunk by U-44 ninety miles west north west of Ushant with the loss of five lives. (Photo: Ian J. Farquhar Collection)

DEUCALION (2) was built in 1900 by Scott & Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 7030grt, a length of 443ft, a beam of 52ft 7in and a service speed of 10 knots. The final ship of the class she was completed in 1900 and had an uneventful career. On 31st January 1930 she sailed from Liverpool bound for her new owners, Ditta L. Pittaluga Vapori of Genoa who renamed her Aquitania. After three more years service she was broken up at Genoa. (Photo: John Clarkson Collection)

ATALANTA was built in 1899 by Kwong Tak Cheong at Hong Kong with a tonnage of 107grt, a length of 86ft, a beam of 17ft 1in and a service speed of 7 knots. She was built for harbour tender services at Hong Kong and acquired by Ocean Steam Ship Co. in 1902 for similar duties. In 1923 she was sold to Tang Luk of Hong Kong and renamed Moon Tong. Sold to unknown Chinese owners in 1927 she returned to Hong Kong under the ownership of Tsang Chak In of Hong Kong in 1929. After WW2 she was deleted from the registers.

PELEUS (1) was built in 1901 by Workman, Clark & Co. Ltd. at Belfast with a tonnage of 7441grt, a length of 454ft 8in, a beam of 54ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. The first of a new class of four larger ships she started her career badly when she stuck on the ways when she was launched on 23rd February 1901 and it was week before she she completed her launch. On 21st September 1915 she collided with the Marchioness and the tug Flying Wizard near Greenock. After thirty years of service she was sold to Madrigal & Co. of Manila, renamed Perseus and two years later was broken up at Osaka in Japan. (Photo: John Clarkson Collection)

TYDEUS (1) was built in 1901 by Workman, Clark & Co. Ltd. at Belfast with a tonnage of 7441grt, a length of 454ft 8in, a beam of 54ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Peleus she had an uneventful career which lasted for thirty years when she arrived at the yard of Smith & Houston at Port Glasgow for demolition in January 1931. (Photo: John Clarkson Collection)

TELEMACHUS (1) was built in 1901 by Workman, Clark & Co. Ltd. at Belfast with a tonnage of 7450grt, a length of 454ft 8in, a beam of 54ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Peleus she was delivered in 1902. On 7th May 1910 she spotted a small boat when 464 miles west of Minikoi Island in the Indian Ocean. There were two persons in the boat one of whom was dead. The survivor, Joshua Green, said that the boat had set out with three occupants to sail from one island in the Seychelles to another but had lost sight of land. A steam ship had stopped to give them provisions and directions but they, again, lost their way. The first person to die had been put overboard but Green was too weak to deal with the second death in a similar manner. When he was rescued Joshua Green had been adrift for four months and was 900 miles from home. Between October 1915 and June 1918 the Telemachus was requisitioned by the Government for use as Expeditionary Force Transport No. C 106 and deployed transporting stores from Canada. In 1932 she was sold to Ditta Luigi Pittaluga Vapori of Genoa who renamed her Tasmania. She was broken up during the following year in Italy. (Photo: Ian J Farquhar Collection)

JASON (2) was built in 1902 by Workman, Clark & Co. Ltd. at Belfast with a tonnage of 7450grt, a length of 454ft 8in, a beam of 54ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. The last of the class she left the yard on 10th July 1902 and had an uneventful career. She was requisitioned by the British Government for war service between 27th July 1915 and 29th March 1918. She was sold to Japanese shipbreakers in 1931. (Photo: John Clarkson Collection)

CHING WO was built in 1894 by Workman, Clark & Co. Ltd. at Belfast with a tonnage of 3883grt, a length of 370ft, a beam of 45ft 4in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was built for the China Mutual Shipper's Steam Navigation Co. of Liverpool and acquired by Holt's when the company was taken over in 1902. China Mutual had been founded in 1882 as a non-conference line funded mainly by a group of Manchester merchants and was a thorn Holt's side. However, a short sharp recession at the turn of the century overstretched China Mutual which enabled Holt's, with their substantial financial reserves, to acquire the company giving them a virtual monopoly in the Far East. In 1911 she was sold to Uchida Kisen K. K. of Tarumi in Japan and renamed Unkai Maru No.2. She was sold to the French Government and renamed Indochine in 1920 and broken up in 1923.

OOPACK was built in 1894 by Workman, Clark & Co. Ltd. at Belfast with a tonnage of 3883grt, a length of 370ft, a beam of 45ft 4in and a service speed of 10 knots. One of the oldest ships of the China Mutual fleet she was acquired by Holt's in 1902. On 4th October 1918, when 110 miles east of Malta, she was hit in the No. 1 and No. 2 holds by torpedoes fired by U-68 and was the company's last war casualty. Under the command of Capt. D. T. Williams she had sailed from Milo in Greece on 2nd October in a seven ship 7, knot convoy escorted by HMS Snapdragon and bound for Malta, 479 miles away. The U-68, commanded by Lt.Cmdr Karl Doenitz who was later to become better know during WW2 as Adolf Hitler's successor, had been spotted shadowing the convoy earlier that evening. After the attack the escort chased her until she surfaced nearby. As the submarine's gun crew came on deck to man the gun the Snapdragon's first shell demolished the conning tower and the helpless U-68 surrendered. The survivors of both the Oopack and the submarine where taken aboard the Snapdragon. As the Snapdragon entered Malta the survivors lined the deck and Doenitz ordered his men to remove their caps and shout 'Hoch der Kaiser' (Up the Kaiser). Whilst on board Snapdragon Capt. Williams was able to tell Doenitz that he had only sunk one ship and not two as he had believed. (Photo: World Ship Photo Library)

KAISOW was built in 1895 by D&W Henderson at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3921grt, a length of 370ft, a beam of 45ft 4in and a service speed of 10 knots. Built for the China Mutual Steam Navigation she was acquired by Holts when the company was purchased by them in 1902. She remained until 1911 when she was sold to Kanamori Gomei Kaisha of Amagasaki, Japan and renamed Shintsu Maru. In 1919 she was renamed Toyo Maru. She was sold to A/D Gylfe of Denmark in 1921 and was managed by T. C. Christensen as the Alssund until 1923 when she was broken up.

PAK LING (2) was built in 1895 by Workman, Clark & Co. Ltd. at Belfast with a tonnage of 4614grt, a length of 410ft, a beam of 48ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Built for the China Mutual Steam Navigation she was acquired by Holts when the company was purchased by them in 1902. On 6th July 1920 she went aground on Button Island, Bonham Straits, 100 miles south of Shanghai, in foggy conditions. She was refloated with the assistance of Shanghai Tug & Lighterage Co's tug St Dominic on 13th July and proceeded to Shanghai where she was repaired. Three years later, in 1923, she was broken up by Schiffswerke Unterelbe A. G. at Wilhemshaven. (Photo: World Ship Photo Library)

KINTUCK was built in 1895 by Workman, Clark & Co. Ltd. at Belfast with a tonnage of 4447grt, a length of 410ft, a beam of 48ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Built for the China Mutual Steam Navigation she was acquired by Holts when the company was purchased by them in 1902. On 2nd December 1916 she was attacked by a U-boat but managed to deter the submarine with accurate gunfire. In the following year, on 13th June 1917, she was again attacked by a U-boat but managed to escape in the fading light. Her luck ran out on 2nd December 1917 when, during a coastal voyage from London to Barry Roads, she sank after striking a mine laid by UC-17 off Godrevy Lighthouse in Cornwall. (Photo: Ian J Farquhar Collection)

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